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Medical computing

Making the Patient Journey Visible (MPJV)

The MPJV research group is using mobile technology to bring visibility to the patient journey, in order to deliver the right care to the right patient at the right time.

Overview

The vision for ‘Making the Patient Journey Visible’ (MPJV) is to have a hospital-wide mobile application collecting patient journey data and providing this information to other clinicians while recording it for Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB) planning purposes. Data collected will be leveraged to increase quality and safety of care, identify and remove waste and optimise patient flow by identifying constraints. This framework will provide the data required to ensure the right care is provided to the right patient at the right time.

In an ideal world a patient ‘flows’ through a hospital system, receiving the right care at the right time. In reality patients typically are waiting for some form of testing or treatment. Poor patient flow affects not only the quality of care, safety, and satisfaction of the patient, but also the effective use of hospital resources and staff satisfaction. Conversely as flow increases, quality increases and costs go down. Although delays impair patient flow and cause frustration for patients and inefficiencies for staff and other hospital resources there is currently no real time system which brings visibility to the patient journey, identifying waste and ‘constraints’ which prevent the right care, being provided to the right patient, at the right time. Such inefficiencies are increasingly untenable for a sustainable health system. There is a pressing need to develop a framework and a methodology to bring real-time visibility to the clinical events in a patient’s journey. Providing real-time visibility of activity along the patient’s journey to all staff involved in their care is fundamental to creating more efficient patient flow.

The MPJV Project is funded by a 1.5 year CDHB (Canterbury District Health Board) grant in partnership with Sense Medical Ltd.

Lead Researchers

The team consists of clinicians, process engineers, statisticans, informatics scientists designers and surgeons.

Full and part-time staff:

  • Richard Floyd (University of Otago , CDHB, Project Leader)
  • Anthony Butler (University of Otago, Scientific Lead)
  • Saxon Connor (CDHB, Clinical Lead)
  • Lynn Davies(CDHB)

Collaborators

Industrial partners

 Logo_Sense medical_100