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Faecal S100 Proteins in Cystic Fibrosis

Background

Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal genetic disease in the Caucasian population with an average life expectancy of forty years. Death is mainly a result of respiratory failure, which correlates closely to nutritional wellbeing. Poor nutrition is not only strongly linked to poorer lung function but is an independent risk factor for early death.
Achieving and maintaining optimal nutrition in patients with CF is dependent on appropriate absorption of nutrients in the gut, and despite advancements in enzyme therapy some children continue to have growth failure. This could be due to inflammatory changes in the small intestine, similar to that seen in the airway, however this remains an understudied area.

The Study

This study will enrol eligible children prospectively at CF clinic and run over 3 routine clinic appointments for children aged 0-18 years.
The aim of this study is to use non-invasive tests (measuring inflammatory (S100) proteins in the stool) to define the frequency and extent of gut inflammation in a group of children with CF and to correlate these with growth and other factors that can affect nutrition such as gut symptoms. The level of inflammatory proteins found in the stools of children with CF will be compared to children with inflammatory bowel disease, known to have high levels of these markers and children with no inflammatory gut disease.

For further information:

Dr Vesal Moeeni
Department of Paediatrics, University of Otago, Christchurch
PO Box 4345, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
Tel 64 3 372 6718
Email vesalm@yahoo.com

Professor Andrew Day
Department of Paediatrics, University of Otago, Christchurch
PO Box 4345, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
Tel 64 3 372 6718
Email andrew.day@otago.ac.nz