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ENGL311 Renaissance Literature

A study of major English authors in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries from More to Milton.

In this paper we will study English Renaissance literature from Christopher Marlowe's defiant and ground-breaking play, Doctor Faustus, to John Milton's controversial epic poem, Paradise Lost. This period was one of tremendous upheavals and tremendous possibilities. The emergence of the printing press began to shape the way that writers imagined themselves and sparked the first 'information revolution'. The first purpose-built permanent theatres in London were opened. Religion and church governance were pressing national issues: England broke with the Catholic church under Henry VIII, was forcibly re-aligned under Mary Tudor and became Protestant again under Queen Elizabeth. Rulers throughout Europe consolidated their power and attempted to rein in powerful lords, but by the mid-seventeenth century the English parliament took the unprecedented (and hitherto unimaginable) step of executing their king. In the midst of this tumult and upheaval, the writers we will study made their names, renewing old forms and forging new ones. Works studied will be analysed in context to show the cultural, social, political, religious and ideological currents of the time that motivated the creation of this exceptional literature.

Paper title Renaissance Literature
Paper code ENGL311
Subject English
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Not offered in 2017, expected to be offered in 2019
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $851.85
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $3,585.00

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Prerequisite
18 200-level ENGL points
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Notes
Students who have not passed the normal prerequisite may be admitted with approval from the Head of Department.
Contact
evelyn.tribble@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Coordinator: Professor Evelyn Tribble
Lecturers: Michael Cop, Dr Shef Rogers and Professor Evelyn Tribble
Teaching Arrangements
A combination of lectures, seminar discussions and play readings.
Textbooks
Five Renaissance Tragedies, ed. Colin Gibson (available free from the Department of English)

Metaphysical Poetry: An Anthology (Thrift Edition). Mineola, New York: Dover Publications, 2002

Ben Jonson. Volpone and The Alchemist (Oxford World's Classics). Ed. Gordon Campbell. Oxford, 1995

John Milton. Paradise Lost and Other Poems (Signet Classics). London: Penguin Books, 2003
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Information literacy, Research.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
  • Ability to analyse and appreciate English literature published before 1700
  • Knowledge of the cultural and historical context of the English Renaissance
  • Knowledge of early modern theatrical history
  • Familiarity with primary research resources for renaisssance literary scholarship.

^ Top of page

Timetable

Not offered in 2017, expected to be offered in 2019

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

A study of major English authors in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries from More to Milton.

In this paper we will study English Renaissance literature from Christopher Marlowe's defiant and ground-breaking play, Doctor Faustus, to John Milton's controversial epic poem, Paradise Lost. This period was one of tremendous upheavals and tremendous possibilities. The emergence of the printing press began to shape the way that writers imagined themselves and sparked the first 'information revolution'. The first purpose-built permanent theatres in London were opened. Religion and church governance were pressing national issues: England broke with the Catholic church under Henry VIII, was forcibly re-aligned under Mary Tudor and became Protestant again under Queen Elizabeth. Rulers throughout Europe consolidated their power and attempted to rein in powerful lords, but by the mid-seventeenth century the English parliament took the unprecedented (and hitherto unimaginable) step of executing their king.

In the midst of this tumult and upheaval, the writers we will study made their names, renewing old forms and forging new ones. Works studied will be analysed in context to show the cultural, social, political, religious and ideological currents of the time that motivated the creation of this exceptional literature.

Paper title Renaissance Literature
Paper code ENGL311
Subject English
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Not offered in 2018, expected to be offered in 2019
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2018 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
18 200-level ENGL points
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Notes
Students who have not passed the normal prerequisite may be admitted with approval from the Head of Department.
Contact
evelyn.tribble@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Coordinator: Professor Evelyn Tribble
Lecturers: Michael Cop, Dr Shef Rogers and Professor Evelyn Tribble
Teaching Arrangements
A combination of lectures, seminar discussions and play readings.
Textbooks
Five Renaissance Tragedies, ed. Colin Gibson (available free from the Department of English)

Metaphysical Poetry: An Anthology (Thrift Edition). Mineola, New York: Dover Publications, 2002

Ben Jonson. Volpone and The Alchemist (Oxford World's Classics). Ed. Gordon Campbell. Oxford, 1995

John Milton. Paradise Lost and Other Poems (Signet Classics). London: Penguin Books, 2003
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Information literacy, Research.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
  • Ability to analyse and appreciate English literature published before 1700
  • Knowledge of the cultural and historical context of the English Renaissance
  • Knowledge of early modern theatrical history
  • Familiarity with primary research resources for renaisssance literary scholarship.

^ Top of page

Timetable

Not offered in 2018, expected to be offered in 2019

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard