Accessibility Skip to Global Navigation Skip to Local Navigation Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Site Map Menu

ENGL323 Fantasy and the Imagination

An advanced examination of fantasy literature, from Beowulf to Harry Potter, and the interaction between the literary and the visual, by way of illustrations, dust jackets, stage-plays, videogames, TV and movies.

This paper examines a selection of fantasy literature, from Beowulf to Harry Potter, and the interaction between the literary and the visual, by way of illustrations, dust jackets, stage-plays, videogames, TV and movies.

Paper title Fantasy and the Imagination
Paper code ENGL323
Subject English
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Summer School
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2018 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
18 200-level ENGL points
Restriction
ENGL 223
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Contact
paul.tankard@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Convenor: Dr Paul Tankard
Paper Structure
This paper is taught in four 1-hour lectures each week, two 1-hour tutorials each week, and one 2-hour seminar for six weeks.
Textbooks
  • Beowulf (c. 8th-11th centuries), trans. Michael Alexander. Penguin Classics.
  • Sir Orfeo (c. 14th century; trans. in Course Book)
  • William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night's Dream (1600). Any modern annotated edition.
  • Charles Perrault, The Complete Fairy Tales (1697), illus. Gustave Dore, trans. Christopher Betts (Oxford World's Classics)
  • Romantic Fairy Tales, ed. Carol Tully. Penguin Classics. (Goethe, Tieck, Fouque, Brentano)
  • Horace Walpole, The Castle of Otranto: A Gothic Story (1764), ed. Nick Groom. Oxford World's Classics
  • Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, illus. John Tenniel (1865-71), ed. Peter Hunt. Oxford World's Classics
  • George MacDonald, At the Back of the North Wind, illus. Arthur Hughes (1871). Everyman's Library
  • E. Nesbit, Five Children and It, illus. H.R. Miller (1902), ed. Sandra Kemp. Oxford World's Classics
  • J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit: Or, There and Back Again, illus. by the author (1937). Any edition
  • Ursula Le Guin, A Wizard of Earthsea, illus. Ruth Robbins (1968). Any edition (later books in series not required)
  • J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (1997). Any edition
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Information Literacy, Critical Thinking, Global Perspective, Communication, Scholarship, Self-Motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
As a result of this paper, students will achieve the following outcomes:
  • Gain familiarity with international scholarship on fantasy literature, especially the historical roots of the genre. In-depth Knowledge and Global Perspective
  • Develop the ability to analyse fantasy literature logically, to challenge conventional assumptions and to consider different options and viewpoints. Information Literacy and Critical Thinking
  • Develop the ability to communicate information, arguments and analyses effectively, both orally and in writing. Communication
  • Develop the ability to conduct research by recognising when information is needed and by locating, retrieving, evaluating and using it effectively. Scholarship
  • Develop the capacity for self-directed activity and the ability to work independently. Self-Motivation

^ Top of page

Timetable

Summer School

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
A1 Monday 11:00-11:50 2-7
Tuesday 11:00-11:50 2-5, 7
Wednesday 11:00-11:50 2-7
Thursday 11:00-11:50 2-7

Tutorial

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
A1 Monday 14:00-14:50 3-7
Wednesday 14:00-14:50 2-7
AND
B1 Thursday 13:00-14:50 2-7