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ANTH411 Special Topic: Theory in Cultural Anthropology

Paper title Special Topic: Theory in Cultural Anthropology
Paper code ANTH411
Subject Anthropology
EFTS 0.1667
Points 20 points
Teaching period Second Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $1,076.55
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $4,267.52

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Prerequisite
72 300-level ANTH points
Contact
tim.thomas@otago.ac.nz or anthropology@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Dr Tim Thomas
Teaching Arrangements
One 2-hour lecture per week.
Textbooks
There is no textbook for the paper. Students will be referred to electronic journal articles, as well as a range of other media sources (documentaries, movies, websites etc.) and contemporary journalism, including editorials. All key materials are made available via library reserve, e-reserve and/or Blackboard and some materials will be distributed in class.
Course outline
Course outline will be made available at start of second semester, 2016.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Interdisciplinary perspective, Lifelong learning, Scholarship, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Ethics, Research, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
  • An understanding of the ways in which socio-cultural anthropology has been and continues to be intertwined with fundamental questions in social theory, political philosophy and ethics
  • Familiarity with broad historical and contemporary debates in the human sciences
  • Ability to identify, summarise and critically review the theoretical assumptions and paradigms that inform anthropological investigation, including some of the key concepts and major theorists which have shaped the discipline
  • An understanding of the interpretive skills prevalent in some of the human sciences
  • An appreciation of the importance of self-reflection in social scientific and humanistic inquiry
  • An ability to develop and defend a theoretical argument of one's own, in both written and verbal form

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Timetable

Second Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
None

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Wednesday 09:00-10:50 28-34, 36-41
Paper title Special Topic: Theory in Cultural Anthropology
Paper code ANTH411
Subject Anthropology
EFTS 0.1667
Points 20 points
Teaching period Not offered in 2018, expected to be offered in 2020
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2018 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
72 300-level ANTH points
Contact
anthropology@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Dr Tim Thomas
Teaching Arrangements
One 2-hour lecture per week.
Textbooks
There is no textbook for the paper. Students will be referred to electronic journal articles, as well as a range of other media sources (documentaries, movies, websites etc.) and contemporary journalism, including editorials. All key materials are made available via library reserve, e-reserve and/or Blackboard and some materials will be distributed in class.
Course outline
Course outline will be made available at start of second semester, 2016.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Cultural understanding, Ethics, Research.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
  • An understanding of the ways in which socio-cultural anthropology has been and continues to be intertwined with fundamental questions in social theory, political philosophy and ethics
  • Familiarity with broad historical and contemporary debates in the human sciences
  • Ability to identify, summarise and critically review the theoretical assumptions and paradigms that inform anthropological investigation, including some of the key concepts and major theorists which have shaped the discipline
  • An understanding of the interpretive skills prevalent in some of the human sciences
  • An appreciation of the importance of self-reflection in social scientific and humanistic inquiry
  • An ability to develop and defend a theoretical argument of one's own, in both written and verbal form

^ Top of page

Timetable

Not offered in 2018, expected to be offered in 2020

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
None