Accessibility Skip to Global Navigation Skip to Local Navigation Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Site Map Menu

BIOA201 Biocultural Human Skeletal Biology

An introduction to human bioarchaeology, particularly evolutionary and comparative anatomy of the human body, what makes it unique among other primates, and why it varies among populations. Includes aspects of forensic anthropology.

What makes humans unique to all other primates, and how did we come to be that way? How can we explain the variation in morphology among human populations? How can we use aspects of the skeleton of past people to look at their life history? This course explores these questions by providing an introduction to the study of Biological Anthropology of the human skeleton. The course primarily focuses on the evolution, structure and function of the human skeletal system, with an introduction to bioarchaeological and forensic methods.

Paper title Biocultural Human Skeletal Biology
Paper code BIOA201
Subject Biological Anthropology
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period First Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $1,018.05
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $4,500.00

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
((One of ARCH 101, ANTH 103, BIOA 101 BIOL 112, CELS 191, HUBS 191, HUBS 192) and 36 further points) or 108 points
Schedule C
Arts and Music, Science
Eligibility
Contact
bioa201@anatomy.otago.ac.nz
Anatomy Office Room 231
2nd Floor, Lindo Ferguson Building (LFB)
Tel: 03 479 7362
Teaching staff
2017 Teaching Staff to be confirmed - please contact the Department for more information.
Teaching Arrangements
All teaching is undertaken on campus.
Textbooks
White T and Folkens P, 2005. The Human Bone Manual Amsterdam. Academic Press.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Interdisciplinary perspective, Lifelong learning, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Ethics, Information literacy, Research, Self-motivation, Teamwork, Environmental literacy.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
  • Develop an understanding of the biological basis for human variation
  • Develop a detailed understanding of human musculoskeletal anatomy, including the functional anatomy of joints and muscles, from bioarchaeological and forensic perspectives
  • Develop an understanding of primate comparative musculoskeletal anatomy and how this relates to human evolution
  • Develop an understanding of human bone and dental biology, specifically with regards to growth and development
  • Develop an understanding of the biological basis of sexual dimorphism in humans and how sex estimation is established in bioarchaeology and forensic identification
  • Demonstrate the ability to observe, describe, interpret and communicate aspects of the human skeleton from a bioarchaeological, evolutionary and forensic perspective
Paper Structure

^ Top of page

Timetable

First Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Moodle

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Monday 09:00-09:50 9-15, 17-22
Tuesday 09:00-09:50 9-15, 18-22

Practical

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
P1 Thursday 14:00-15:50 9-15, 17-22
P2 Thursday 16:00-17:50 9-15, 17-22

An introduction to human bioarchaeology, particularly evolutionary and comparative anatomy of the human body, what makes it unique among other primates, and why it varies among populations. Includes aspects of forensic anthropology.

What makes humans unique to all other primates, and how did we come to be that way? How can we explain the variation in morphology among human populations? How can we use aspects of the skeleton of past people to look at their life history? This paper explores these questions by providing an introduction to the study of Biological Anthropology of the human skeleton. The paper primarily focuses on the evolution, structure and function of the human skeletal system, with an introduction to bioarchaeological and forensic methods.

Paper title Biocultural Human Skeletal Biology
Paper code BIOA201
Subject Biological Anthropology
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period(s) First Semester, Summer School
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2018 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
((One of ARCH 101, ANTH 103, ANTH 106, BIOA 101 BIOL 112, CELS 191, HUBS 191, HUBS 192) and 36 further points) or 108 points
Schedule C
Arts and Music, Science
Contact
bioa201@anatomy.otago.ac.nz
Anatomy Office Room 231
2nd Floor, Lindo Ferguson Building (LFB)
Tel: 03 479 7362
Teaching staff
2018 Teaching Staff to be confirmed - please contact the Department for more information.
Teaching Arrangements
All teaching is undertaken on campus.
Textbooks
White T and Folkens P, 2005. The Human Bone Manual Amsterdam. Academic Press.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Interdisciplinary perspective, Lifelong learning, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Ethics, Information literacy, Research, Self-motivation, Teamwork, Environmental literacy.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
  • Develop an understanding of the biological basis for human variation
  • Develop a detailed understanding of human musculoskeletal anatomy, including the functional anatomy of joints and muscles, from bioarchaeological and forensic perspectives
  • Develop an understanding of primate comparative musculoskeletal anatomy and how this relates to human evolution
  • Develop an understanding of human bone and dental biology, specifically with regards to growth and development
  • Develop an understanding of the biological basis of sexual dimorphism in humans and how sex estimation is established in bioarchaeology and forensic identification
  • Demonstrate the ability to observe, describe, interpret and communicate aspects of the human skeleton from a bioarchaeological, evolutionary and forensic perspective

^ Top of page

Timetable

First Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Moodle

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Monday 09:00-09:50 9-13, 15-22
Tuesday 09:00-09:50 9-13, 15-22

Practical

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
P1 Thursday 14:00-15:50 10-13, 15-22
P2 Thursday 16:00-17:50 10-13, 15-22

Summer School

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Moodle

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Tuesday 10:00-10:50 2-5, 7
Wednesday 10:00-10:50 2-7
Thursday 10:00-10:50 2-7
Friday 10:00-10:50 2-7

Practical

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
A1 Wednesday 14:00-15:50 2-7
AND
B1 Friday 14:00-15:50 2-7