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EDCR302 Debating Curriculum

Engages students in debate about the way in which early childhood curriculum is influenced by the historical, political, theoretical, ideological, cultural and social context both nationally and internationally.

The aim of this paper is to challenge students to think critically about curriculum. Te Whāriki has been an integral part of early childhood practice in this country for almost two decades. There is evidence to suggest that it has been influential in the development of other curriculum documents throughout the world. The sector has a sense of pride and ownership that the Aotearoa/New Zealand curriculum has been seen as innovative. It is a curriculum that is strongly based on the rights of the child and seeks to empower children to be active learners and participants in their world.

However, sometimes curriculum discourse can be taken for granted and become what Foucault would call a regime of truth. To avoid this happening we need to be constantly reflecting on Te Whāriki, considering and reconsidering whether there may be alternative approaches. Does the curriculum provide a basis for the weaving of exemplary practice? Does the curriculum create learning possibilities meaningful and relevant for all children? Does the curriculum fit the educational thinking of the 21st century? It is important you engage in ongoing dialogue and debate about appropriate curriculum.

To assist in a critical reflection of Te Whāriki students will have an opportunity to explore and debate curriculum approaches that have been developed in Australia, the Asia/Pacific region, Britain and other countries of interest. The final debate will be: what could or should early childhood curriculum look like in this country in the 21st century?

Paper title Debating Curriculum
Paper code EDCR302
Subject Education
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period(s) Second Semester, Second Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $813.45
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $3,585.00

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Prerequisite
36 EDUC points or 108 points
Limited to
BTchg, GradDipEdTchg, GradDipTchg
Notes
Early Childhood Education students only.
Eligibility
This paper is for Early Childhood Education students only.
Contact
Programme Co-ordinator (Early Childhood Education): Judy Layland, judy.layland@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Paper Co-ordinator: to be confirmed
Other staff: Mary O'Rourke (Southland)
Paper Structure
This paper aims to encourage students to deepen their understanding of early childhood curriculum through investigation and debate of the ways in which both national and international curriculum are influenced by historical, theoretical, political, ideological, cultural and social factors. This investigation and debate will lead to an analysis of the provision of early childhood education for all children.

The historical, theoretical, political, ideological, cultural and social contexts of curriculum:
  • Impact on early child education
  • Impact on learners
Curriculum from a range of national and international perspectives:
  • National approaches
  • Te Whāriki
  • New Zealand Curriculum Framework
  • Philosophical
  • International models
Analysis of the implications for the provision of early childhood education for all children
Teaching Arrangements
This paper is taught on the Dunedin and Invercargill campuses.
Textbooks
Nuttall, J. (2013). Weaving Te Whāriki - Aotearoa New Zealand's Early Childhood Curriculum Document in Theory and Practice. (2nd ed) Wellington, NZCER Press.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Information literacy, Research, Teamwork.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
Students who successfully complete this paper will be able:
  1. To critically examine the ways in which the historical, theoretical, political, ideological, cultural and social context impact on early childhood curriculum and learners
  2. To investigate curriculum from a range of national and international perspectives
  3. To synthesise a range of views on early childhood curriculum and analyse the implications for the provision of early childhood education for all children

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Timetable

Second Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Wednesday 13:00-14:50 28-34, 40-41

Tutorial

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
T1 Monday 11:00-11:50 28-34, 40-41

Second Semester

Location
Invercargill
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Engages students in debate about the way in which early childhood curriculum is influenced by the historical, political, theoretical, ideological, cultural and social context both nationally and internationally.

The aim of this paper is to challenge students to think critically about curriculum. Te Wh?üriki has been an integral part of early childhood practice in this country for almost two decades. There is evidence to suggest that it has been influential in the development of other curriculum documents throughout the world. The sector has a sense of pride and ownership that the Aotearoa/New Zealand curriculum has been seen as innovative. It is a curriculum that is strongly based on the rights of the child and seeks to empower children to be active learners and participants in their world.

However, sometimes curriculum discourse can be taken for granted and become what Foucault would call a regime of truth. To avoid this happening we need to be constantly reflecting on Te Wh?üriki, considering and reconsidering whether there may be alternative approaches. Does the curriculum provide a basis for the weaving of exemplary practice? Does the curriculum create learning possibilities meaningful and relevant for all children? Does the curriculum fit the educational thinking of the 21st century? It is important you engage in ongoing dialogue and debate about appropriate curriculum.

To assist in a critical reflection of Te Wh?üriki students will have an opportunity to explore and debate curriculum approaches that have been developed in Australia, the Asia/Pacific region, Britain and other countries of interest. The final debate will be: what could or should early childhood curriculum look like in this country in the 21st century?

Paper title Debating Curriculum
Paper code EDCR302
Subject Education
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period(s) Second Semester, Second Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2018 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
36 EDUC points or 108 points
Limited to
BTchg, GradDipEdTchg, GradDipTchg
Notes
Early Childhood Education students only.
Paper Structure
This paper aims to encourage students to deepen their understanding of early childhood curriculum through investigation and debate of the ways in which both national and international curriculum are influenced by historical, theoretical, political, ideological, cultural and social factors. This investigation and debate will lead to an analysis of the provision of early childhood education for all children.

The historical, theoretical, political, ideological, cultural and social contexts of curriculum:
  • Impact on early child education
  • Impact on learners
Curriculum from a range of national and international perspectives:
  • National approaches
  • Te WhÄriki
  • New Zealand Curriculum Framework
  • Philosophical
  • International models
Analysis of the implications for the provision of early childhood education for all children
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Information literacy, Research, Teamwork.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
Students who successfully complete this paper will be able:
  1. To critically examine the ways in which the historical, theoretical, political, ideological, cultural and social context impact on early childhood curriculum and learners
  2. To investigate curriculum from a range of national and international perspectives
  3. To synthesise a range of views on early childhood curriculum and analyse the implications for the provision of early childhood education for all children
Eligibility
This paper is for Early Childhood Education students only.
Contact
Programme Co-ordinator (Early Childhood Education): Judy Layland, judy.layland@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Paper Co-ordinator: Dr Sonya Gaches
Other staff: Mary O'Rourke (Southland)
Teaching Arrangements
This paper is taught on the Dunedin and Invercargill campuses.
Textbooks
Smith, A.B. (2013). Understanding Children and Childhood (5th ed.), Welling, Bridget Williams Publishing

^ Top of page

Timetable

Second Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Monday 11:00-11:50 28-34, 40-41

Tutorial

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
T1 Wednesday 13:00-14:50 28-34, 40-41

Second Semester

Location
Invercargill
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard