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GEOG465 Special Topic in Geography

Justice is a core principle in a democratic society. But what does justice mean? What is just for some groups in society may not be just for others. In an era of significant change - looking back to the last 50 years or so and looking forward to a raft of uncertainties across the globe in the future - the question of justice is pertinent.

A keen sensitivity to issues of justice and ways of assessing the question, 'What is just?' is required for all policy makers in social, environmental and economic governance roles.

This paper will provide students with an understanding of what injustice means in a range of circumstances, with a view to equipping students with the analytical skills, sensitivity and understanding of how the question of justice affects people differently in different places and in relation to different issues.

Paper title Special Topic in Geography
Paper code GEOG465
Subject Geography
EFTS 0.1667
Points 20 points
Teaching period Second Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $1,256.92
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $5,151.03

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Contact
geography@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Co-ordinators: Dr Sophie Bond and Dr Christina Ergler
Paper Structure
Topics:
  • Part I: What is justice? Justice for whom?
  • Part II: Social Justice
  • Part III: Environmental Justice
  • Part IV: Global Justice
Teaching Arrangements
Assessment:
  • 100% from internal:
    • Essay 25%
    • Class facilitation 20%
    • Group presentation 25%
    • Take-home exam 30%
Textbooks
There are no prescribed textbooks for this paper. Readings will be selected and prescribed from a range of journals, texts and edited collections. These will be made available either through the library or on Blackboard.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Ethics, Environmental literacy, Information literacy, Research, Self-motivation, Teamwork.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
Students who successfully complete the paper will be able to
  • Understand key debates in relation to justice in geography and the social sciences
  • Evaluate contemporary issues and identify the complexities of intersecting (in)justices for different groups in society
  • Evaluate how groups seek to address injustice and situate these within theoretical understandings of contemporary global- and local-level politics and policy frameworks
  • Generate policy recommendations for addressing issues of injustice within particular contexts

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Timetable

Second Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Thursday 14:00-16:50 28-34, 36-41

A Special Topic in Geography that may be either a lecture programme or an individual supervised course of study

Paper title Special Topic in Geography
Paper code GEOG465
Subject Geography
EFTS 0.1667
Points 20 points
Teaching period First Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $1,282.09
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $5,357.07

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Contact
geography@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Co-ordinator: Associate Professor Michelle Thompson-Fawcett
Paper Structure
Topics:
  • Part I: What is justice? Justice for whom?
  • Part II: Social Justice
  • Part III: Environmental Justice
  • Part IV: Global Justice
Teaching Arrangements
Assessment:
  • 100% from internal:
    • Essay 25%
    • Class facilitation 20%
    • Group presentation 25%
    • Take-home exam 30%
Textbooks
There are no prescribed textbooks for this paper.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Ethics, Environmental literacy, Information literacy, Research, Self-motivation, Teamwork.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
Students who successfully complete the paper will be able to
  • Understand key debates in relation to justice in geography and the social sciences
  • Evaluate contemporary issues and identify the complexities of intersecting (in)justices for different groups in society
  • Evaluate how groups seek to address injustice and situate these within theoretical understandings of contemporary global- and local-level politics and policy frameworks
  • Generate policy recommendations for addressing issues of injustice within particular contexts

^ Top of page

Timetable

First Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard