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HIST107 New Zealand in the World, 1350-2000

New Zealand history from its beginnings in the Polynesian world, to a colony of the global British empire, and to a multicultural nation that now identifies itself as part of the Asia-Pacific region.

New Zealand was the last landmass to be discovered and colonised by humans and has been made and remade by connections to the Pacific, Britain and Asia and has in turn impacted upon those places. Amongst other things this paper looks at how Polynesian discovery and settlement, cross-cultural encounters, colonisation, war and the emergence of strong central government helped shape the evolution of modern New Zealand. As well as spanning New Zealand's human history, this paper introduces students to key concepts and conventions used by historians. These analytical and communication skills are highly regarded and extremely transferable, which helps explain why history graduates are found in diverse professions.

The paper is essential for students who major in History, and it also complements studies in a wide range of subjects, including law, psychology, politics, anthropology, marketing, sociology, physical education, Māori, Pacific and Indigenous Studies, and English.

In 2017, this paper is 100% internally assessed.

Paper title New Zealand in the World, 1350-2000
Paper code HIST107
Subject History
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period First Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $851.85
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $3,585.00

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Schedule C
Arts and Music
Contact
michael.stevens@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Dr Michael Stevens
Textbooks
Recommended: A Concise History of New Zealand, by Philippa Mein Smith, 2012.

In addition, course materials will be made available electronically.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Lifelong learning, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Environmental literacy, Information literacy.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
Students will:
  • Gain an understanding of key events, personalities and trends over the span of New Zealand's human history
  • Be introduced to central concepts that historians use to frame, communicate and debate this past

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Timetable

First Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Tuesday 14:00-14:50 9-15, 18-22
Thursday 14:00-14:50 9-15, 17-22

Tutorial

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
T1 Monday 10:00-10:50 10, 12, 14, 17, 19, 21
T2 Monday 12:00-12:50 10, 12, 14, 17, 19, 21
T3 Wednesday 12:00-12:50 10, 12, 14, 17, 19, 21
T4 Wednesday 13:00-13:50 10, 12, 14, 17, 19, 21
T5 Wednesday 15:00-15:50 10, 12, 14, 17, 19, 21
T6 Friday 10:00-10:50 10, 12, 14, 17, 19, 21
T7 Friday 11:00-11:50 10, 12, 14, 17, 19, 21

New Zealand history in a global perspective: the way forces of imperialism, colonisation, capitalism and racial conflict have shaped modern New Zealand and its place in the world.

New Zealand was the last landmass to be discovered and colonised by humans and has been made and remade by connections to the Pacific, Britain and Asia and has in turn impacted upon those places. Amongst other things this paper looks at how Polynesian discovery and settlement, cross-cultural encounters, colonisation, war and the emergence of strong central government helped shape the evolution of modern New Zealand.

As well as spanning New Zealand's human history, this paper introduces students to key concepts and conventions used by historians. These analytical and communication skills are highly regarded and extremely transferable, which helps explain why history graduates are found in diverse professions.

The paper is essential for students who major in History, and it also complements studies in a wide range of subjects, including law, psychology, politics, anthropology, marketing, sociology, physical education, Māori, Pacific and Indigenous Studies, and English.

This paper is 100% internally assessed.

Paper title New Zealand in the World from the 18th Century
Paper code HIST107
Subject History
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period First Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2018 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Schedule C
Arts and Music
Teaching staff
Co-ordinator:Associate Professor Angela Wanhalla
Lecturer: Professor Barbara Brookes
Textbooks
Recommended: A Concise History of New Zealand, by Philippa Mein Smith, 2012.

In addition, course materials will be made available electronically.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Lifelong learning, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Environmental literacy, Information literacy.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
Students will:
  • Gain an understanding of key events, personalities and trends over the span of New Zealand's human history
  • Be introduced to central concepts that historians use to frame, communicate and debate this past
Contact
angela.wanhalla@otago.ac.nz

^ Top of page

Timetable

First Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Tuesday 14:00-14:50 9-13, 15-22
Thursday 14:00-14:50 9-13, 15-22

Tutorial

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
T1 Monday 10:00-10:50 10, 12-13, 16, 18, 21
T2 Monday 12:00-12:50 10, 12-13, 16, 18, 21
T3 Wednesday 12:00-12:50 10, 12-13, 16, 18, 21
T4 Wednesday 13:00-13:50 10, 12-13, 16, 18, 21
T5 Wednesday 15:00-15:50 10, 12-13, 16, 18, 21
T6 Thursday 10:00-10:50 10, 12-13, 16, 18, 21
T7 Thursday 11:00-11:50 10, 12-13, 16, 18, 21