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HIST213 Rise to Globalism: The USA since 1900

A survey of the history of the United States in the twentieth century, which saw the nation transformed from an isolationist, middle-level power to the world’s most powerful nation. The paper examines the causes and significance of this change, from domestic and international perspectives.

This paper introduces students to the history of the United States in the 20th century. In addition to familiarising students with the important people, places and events of the period, certain major themes/developments will be stressed. Among the developments to be examined are industrialisation, urbanisation, immigration, war and diplomacy, depression, counterculture and the rightward turn in the 1980s. Three broad themes will dominate our look at this portion of American history: the search for national identity, the struggle for group and individual rights and the nation's emerging global role.

Paper title Rise to Globalism: The USA since 1900
Paper code HIST213
Subject History
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Not offered in 2017
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $851.85
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $3,585.00

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Prerequisite
One 100-level HIST paper or 54 points
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Contact
russell.johnson@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Dr Russell Johnson
Textbooks
Course materials will be made available electronically.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Scholarship, Critical thinking, Research.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
  • To develop an ability to ask significant questions, to interpret and evaluate primary and secondary sources and to express ideas in a logical, concise manner
  • To understand the course of development of the United States in the 20th century - in terms of both change and continuity
  • To gain an appreciation for the diversity of experience of different groups in the period - men/women, whites/blacks/natives, managers/capitalists/workers, etc
  • To understand the causes and consequences of defining moments in this period of US history, such as the New Deal and the Vietnam War

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Timetable

Not offered in 2017

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

A survey of the history of the United States in the twentieth century, which saw the nation transformed from an isolationist, middle-level power to the world’s most powerful nation. The paper examines the causes and significance of this change, from domestic and international perspectives.

This paper introduces students to the history of the United States in the 20th century. In addition to familiarising students with the important people, places and events of the period, certain major themes/developments will be stressed. Among the developments to be examined are industrialisation, urbanisation, immigration, war and diplomacy, depression, counterculture and the rightward turn in the 1980s. Three broad themes will dominate our look at this portion of American history: the search for national identity, the struggle for group and individual rights and the nation's emerging global role.

Paper title Rise to Globalism: The USA since 1900
Paper code HIST213
Subject History
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Not offered in 2018
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2018 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
One 100-level HIST paper or 54 points
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Contact
russell.johnson@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Dr Russell Johnson
Textbooks
Course materials will be made available electronically.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Scholarship, Critical thinking, Research.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
  • To develop an ability to ask significant questions, to interpret and evaluate primary and secondary sources and to express ideas in a logical, concise manner
  • To understand the course of development of the United States in the 20th century - in terms of both change and continuity
  • To gain an appreciation for the diversity of experience of different groups in the period - men/women, whites/blacks/natives, managers/capitalists/workers, etc.
  • To understand the causes and consequences of defining moments in this period of US history, such as the New Deal and the Vietnam War

^ Top of page

Timetable

Not offered in 2018

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard