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LAWS420 Law and the Democratic Process

Examines the ways in which New Zealand’s system of law-making both shapes, and is shaped by, its democratic processes.

Paper title Law and the Democratic Process
Paper code LAWS420
Subject Law
EFTS 0.1000
Points 15 points
Teaching period First Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $633.50
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $2,720.00

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Prerequisite
LAWS 201, LAWS 202, LAWS 203, LAWS 204
Limited to
LLB, LLB(Hons)
Notes
(i) Not all optional papers will be available in any given year. (ii) May not be credited together with LAWS477 passed in 2002-2005, 2007 or 2008.
Contact
law@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Professor Andrew Geddis
Textbooks
Andrew Geddis, Election Law in NZ (2nd ed, Lexis Nexis, 2014). Additional course materials are provided by the Faculty.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Interdisciplinary perspective, Lifelong learning, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Ethics, Environmental literacy, Information literacy, Research, Self-motivation, Teamwork.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
The paper combines some legal theory with an in-depth study of New Zealand's electoral laws and the various rules that govern how Parliament operates as a lawmaking body.

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Timetable

First Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Monday 10:00-10:50 9-15, 17-22
Wednesday 10:00-10:50 9-15, 17-22

Examines the ways in which New Zealand’s system of law-making both shapes, and is shaped by, its democratic processes.

The Law and the Democratic Process course examines the way in which New Zealand's system of law-making both shapes, and is shaped by, its democratic processes. It does so through examining three interrelated sets of questions.

  1. Why adopt "democracy" as a means of resolving issues of disagreement amongst the members of society, and why does this method of rule making justify the imposition of that rule upon those who may disagree with it?
  2. In light of New ZealandÔÇÖs general commitment to democratic decision making, how does the law then shape and condition our parliamentary election process? What legal rules govern matters such as who may vote, who may they vote for, how election campaigns may be conducted, how electoral winners and losers are identified, and so on? Why do we have these particular legal rules in place, and are they appropriate or adequate?
  3. Once the election process has identified the members of New ZealandÔÇÖs Parliament, how does this institution go about making law for the country as a whole? What legal rules constrain this lawmaking process? What other forms of control apply to it? How can interested parties involve themselves in that process in an attempt to influence its outcome?
Therefore, the course combines some legal theory with an in-depth study of New ZealandÔÇÖs electoral laws and the various rules that govern how Parliament operates as a lawmaking body.

Paper title Law and the Democratic Process
Paper code LAWS420
Subject Law
EFTS 0.1000
Points 15 points
Teaching period First Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $646.20
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $2,856.00

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
LAWS 201, LAWS 202, LAWS 203, LAWS 204
Limited to
LLB, LLB(Hons)
Notes
(i) Not all optional papers will be available in any given year. (ii) May not be credited together with LAWS477 passed in 2002-2005, 2007 or 2008.
Contact
law@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Professor Andrew Geddis
Textbooks
Andrew Geddis, Election Law in NZ (2nd ed, Lexis Nexis, 2014). Additional course materials are provided by the Faculty.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Interdisciplinary perspective, Lifelong learning, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Ethics, Environmental literacy, Information literacy, Research, Self-motivation, Teamwork.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
The paper combines some legal theory with an in-depth study of New Zealand's electoral laws and the various rules that govern how Parliament operates as a lawmaking body.

^ Top of page

Timetable

First Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Monday 10:00-10:50 9-13, 15-22
Wednesday 10:00-10:50 9-13, 15-16, 18-22