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PAST318 Pastoral Care in Dying, Grief and Loss

The role of chaplains, ministers and other caregivers in situations of death, dying and loss, and the ways they can facilitate a healthy grieving process.

Paper title Pastoral Care in Dying, Grief and Loss
Paper code PAST318
Subject Pastoral Studies
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Second Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $851.85
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $3,585.00

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Prerequisite
One 200-level PAST paper
Restriction
MINS 410
Schedule C
Arts and Music, Theology
Contact
Professor Paul Trebilco, paul.trebilco@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Course Co-ordinator: Professor Paul Trebilco
Lecturer: Dr Kirsten Griffiths
Eligibility
Any student can study Theology, whether they are of the Christian faith, another faith or of no religious faith at all. Theology is an examination of the scriptures, history, content and relevance of the Christian faith, but it presupposes or requires no Christian commitment from students. All it requires is an inquiring mind and an interest in those skills that can be gained through the study of any subject in the Humanities.
Course outline
View the course outline for PAST 318
Teaching Arrangements
Five 2-hour videoconferences and a teaching day
Textbooks
Textbooks are not required for this paper. A course book has been developed for this paper.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Ethics, Research, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
Students who successfully complete the paper will be able to
  • Describe a variety of situations that cause grief, including death, dying and other various kinds of losses
  • Analyse patterns of healthy grief and complications to grief
  • Analyse the role of chaplains, ministers and caregivers in situations involving death, loss and grief
  • Analyse differences in grieving patterns in different cultures within New Zealand and articulate the implications for chaplains, ministers and other caregivers
  • Articulate a personal theology of death, dying, grief and loss, informed by Christian theology
  • Evaluate their own self-care needs in the face of caregiving after grief and loss
Paper Structure
Topics:
  • Module 1: Death and dying
  • Module 2: Grief
  • Module 3: Grieving in Cross-Cultural Perspectives
  • Module 4: Theology of death, dying, loss and grief
  • Module 5: Ceremonies
  • Module 6: Self-care
Assessment:
  • Two essays (1,700 words) - 25% each
  • One essay (2,300 words) - 35%
  • Online discussion - 15%

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Timetable

Second Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught through Distance Learning
Learning management system
Blackboard

The role of chaplains, ministers and other caregivers in situations of death, dying and loss, and the ways they can facilitate a healthy grieving process.

Paper title Pastoral Care in Dying, Grief and Loss
Paper code PAST318
Subject Pastoral Studies
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Not offered in 2018, expected to be offered in 2019
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2018 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
One 200-level PAST paper
Restriction
MINS 410
Schedule C
Arts and Music, Theology
Eligibility
Any student can study Theology, whether they are of the Christian faith, another faith or of no religious faith at all. Theology is an examination of the scriptures, history, content and relevance of the Christian faith, but it presupposes or requires no Christian commitment from students. All it requires is an inquiring mind and an interest in those skills that can be gained through the study of any subject in the Humanities.
Contact
lynne.baab@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Course Co-ordinator: Dr Lynne Baab
Lecturer: Dr Kirsten Griffiths
Paper Structure
Topics:
  • Module 1: Death and dying
  • Module 2: Grief
  • Module 3: Grieving in Mï½ori, Asian and African perspectives
  • Module 4: Theology of death, dying, loss and grief
  • Module 5: Ceremonies
  • Module 6: Self-care
Assessment:
  • Two essays (1,700 words) - 25% each
  • One essay (2,300 words) - 35%
  • Online discussion - 15%
Teaching Arrangements
Five 1-hour videoconferences and a teaching day
Textbooks
Textbooks are not required for this paper. A course book has been developed for this paper.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Ethics, Research, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
Students who successfully complete the paper will be able to
  • Describe a variety of situations that cause grief, including death, dying and other various kinds of losses
  • Analyse patterns of healthy grief and complications to grief
  • Analyse the role of chaplains, ministers and caregivers in situations involving death, loss and grief
  • Analyse differences in grieving patterns in different cultures within New Zealand and articulate the implications for chaplains, ministers and other caregivers
  • Articulate a personal theology of death, dying, grief and loss, informed by Christian theology
  • Evaluate their own self-care needs in the face of caregiving after grief and loss

^ Top of page

Timetable

Not offered in 2018, expected to be offered in 2019

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught through Distance Learning
Learning management system
Blackboard