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PHIL222 Introduction to Formal Logic

Logical structure of arguments. Tests for validity.

Learn how to test the logical structure of arguments for validity and prove truths with deductive certainty. The main topics covered are: how to translate arguments into propositional and predicate logic and test for validity by looking for counterexamples. Philosophical issues about the limitations of logic are emphasised.

Paper title Introduction to Formal Logic
Paper code PHIL222
Subject Philosophy
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period First Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $851.85
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $3,585.00

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Prerequisite
One PHIL paper or 18 MATH points or 72 points
Restriction
PHIL 322, PHIL 212
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Notes
The prerequisite will be waived for students with a background in NCEA Level 3 Mathematics (or equivalent).
Learning Outcomes
  1. The ability to formalise and assess arguments for validity
  2. A grasp of how to use formal models to understand data
  3. A demonstrated ability to explain and assess philosophical issues about logic in their own words and to think critically and independently about them
  4. The ability to solve logical problems
  5. Students who enjoy PHIL 222 will be well-prepared for PHIL 312 Advanced Logic, which uses the same methods to study non-classical logics
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Lifelong learning, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Research, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Textbooks
Logic: an introduction by Greg Restall
Contact
zach.weber@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Dr Zach Weber
Paper Structure
Two 1-hour lectures per week and one tutorial. Assessment by two tests and a final exam.
Eligibility
This paper is recommended for students who have taken PHIL 105, but there are no prerequisites.

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Timetable

First Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Tuesday 10:00-10:50 9-15, 18-22
Thursday 09:00-10:50 9-12, 14-15, 17-22

Logical structure of arguments. Tests for validity.

Learn how to test the logical structure of arguments for validity and prove truths with deductive certainty. The main topics covered are: how to translate arguments into propositional and predicate logic and test for validity by looking for counterexamples. Philosophical issues about the limitations of logic are emphasised.

Paper title Introduction to Formal Logic
Paper code PHIL222
Subject Philosophy
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Not offered in 2018, expected to be offered in 2019
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2018 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
One PHIL paper or 18 MATH points or 72 points
Restriction
PHIL 322, PHIL 212
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Notes
The prerequisite will be waived for students with a background in NCEA Level 3 Mathematics (or equivalent).
Eligibility
This paper is recommended for students who have taken PHIL 105, but there are no prerequisites.
Contact
zach.weber@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Dr Zach Weber
Paper Structure
Two 1-hour lectures per week and one tutorial. Assessment by two tests and a final exam.
Textbooks
Logic: an introduction by Greg Restall
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Lifelong learning, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Research, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
  1. The ability to formalise and assess arguments for validity
  2. A grasp of how to use formal models to understand data
  3. A demonstrated ability to explain and assess philosophical issues about logic in their own words and to think critically and independently about them
  4. The ability to solve logical problems
  5. Students who enjoy PHIL 222 will be well-prepared for PHIL 312 Advanced Logic, which uses the same methods to study non-classical logics

^ Top of page

Timetable

Not offered in 2018, expected to be offered in 2019

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard