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POLS312 Ethics and International Relations

The impact of moral concerns on the norms, institutions, and practices of international relations; and normative theory as it is being applied to the interaction of states and other actors across national boundaries.

This paper asks why ethical considerations are crucial in the conduct of international affairs. It teaches students how to engage in ethical arguments related to global justice and international norms.

Paper title Ethics and International Relations
Paper code POLS312
Subject Politics
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period First Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $851.85
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $3,585.00

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Prerequisite
18 200-level POLS points or one of CHTH 231, GEND 201, GEND 208, PHIL 221, PHIL 227, PHIL 228, PHIL 234, PSYC 204
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Notes
May not be credited together with POLS 331 passed before 2005.
Course outline
View the course outline for POLS 312
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Interdisciplinary perspective, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Ethics, Information literacy, Research, Self-motivation, Teamwork.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
The course seeks to develop the student's ability to:
  • Identify and systematically explain the role and function of moral concerns in that part of public life that we call 'international relations'
  • Explicate and evaluate the reasons and justifications for specific moral judgments and proposals that are made with respect to international public affairs today
  • Refine her opinion on ethical questions of the day, and enable her to defend these in public debate.
Eligibility
An interest in national and international affairs is an advantage.
Contact
politics@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Professor Philip Nel
Paper Structure
Class test, group participation in formal debate, and substantial essay
Textbooks
Selected readings are made available online.

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Timetable

First Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Tuesday 14:00-14:50 9-15, 18-22
Thursday 09:00-10:50 9-15, 17-22

The impact of moral concerns on the norms, institutions, and practices of international relations; and normative theory as it is being applied to the interaction of states and other actors across national boundaries.

This paper asks why ethical considerations are crucial in the conduct of international affairs. It teaches students how to engage in ethical arguments related to global justice and international norms.

Paper title Ethics and International Relations
Paper code POLS312
Subject Politics
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Second Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2018 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
18 200-level POLS points or one of CHTH 231, GEND 201, GEND 208, PHIL 221, PHIL 227, PHIL 228, PHIL 234, PSYC 204
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Notes
May not be credited together with POLS 331 passed before 2005.
Eligibility
An interest in national and international affairs is an advantage.
Contact
politics@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Professor Philip Nel
Paper Structure
Class test, group participation in formal debate, and a substantial essay.
Textbooks
Selected readings are made available online.
Course outline
View the course outline for POLS 312
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Interdisciplinary perspective, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Ethics, Information literacy, Research, Self-motivation, Teamwork.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
The course seeks to develop the student's ability to:
  • Identify and systematically explain the role and function of moral concerns in that part of public life that we call 'international relations'
  • Explicate and evaluate the reasons and justifications for specific moral judgments and proposals that are made with respect to international public affairs today
  • Refine her opinion on ethical questions of the day, and enable her to defend these in public debate.

^ Top of page

Timetable

Second Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Tuesday 14:00-14:50 28-34, 36-41
Wednesday 10:00-11:50 28-34, 36-41