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SOCI410 Alternative Futures and the Sociological Imagination

A critical inquiry into alternative forms of social organisation, relying on cutting-edge sociological theory to understand popular resistance, social contention and social change.

In this paper we address topics such as student debt, education, employment and the environment, and explore concepts such as precarity, cognitive justice, degrowth, artivism, digital contention, scholar-activism, and post-capitalism, with the aim of deepening our understanding of everyday life, challenging structural inequalities, and developing the conceptual tools to build alternative and more equitable futures.

Paper title Alternative Futures and the Sociological Imagination
Paper code SOCI410
Subject Sociology
EFTS 0.1667
Points 20 points
Teaching period First Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2018 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

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Prerequisite
72 300-level SOCI points
Eligibility
Students should have at least a B+ average for an undergraduate qualification in the social sciences.
Contact
marcelle.dawson@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Course co-ordinator and lecturer: Dr Marcelle Dawson
Teaching Arrangements
One 3-hour seminar per week. Attendance is compulsory.
Textbooks
Compulsory and recommended reading will be made available via eReserve.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Scholarship, Interdisciplinary Perspective, Ethics, Self-Motivation, Information Literacy, Global Perspective, Cultural Understanding, Lifelong Learning, Critical Thinking, Communication, Teamwork.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
  • Become familiar with advanced debates in sociology.
  • Understand, explain and critically evaluate the intellectual roots of social movements.
  • Develop a global perspective on popular resistance in national and international contexts.
  • Conduct verbal presentations.
  • Be exposed to research within and beyond sociology.
  • Engage in robust, collegial debates with peers and senior scholars.

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Timetable

First Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
A1 Tuesday 09:00-11:50 9-13, 16-22