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Dr Steven Sexton

Dr Steven SextonSenior Lecturer (Science Education)
BSc(Penn State) MTeach PhD(Sydney)

Dunedin Campus
Tel 64 3 479 4285
Email steven.sexton@otago.ac.nz  

Biography

I am a primary school teacher who now works at Otago University. I completed my PhD in teacher cognition in 2007 which investigated how those who are entering their initial teacher education programme see themselves as the teacher and how this role-identity was formed by their prior experiences in the classroom. My research interest areas are in teacher cognition, heteronormativity in the classroom and science education

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Publications

Sexton, S. S. (2017). In The New Zealand Curriculum: Is it science education or education through science? One educator's argument. In B. Akpan (Ed.), Science education: A global perspective. (pp. 219-233). Springer. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-32351-0_11

Sexton, S. S. (2017). The intersection of self and school: How friendship circles influence heterosexual and self-identified queer teenage New Zealand boys' views on acceptable language and behavior. Gender & Education, 29(3), 299-312. doi: 10.1080/09540253.2016.1140722

Sexton, S. (2015). How are teenage male students redefining masculinity and heterosexuality? In A. C. Gunn & L. A. Smith (Eds.), Sexual cultures in Aotearoa New Zealand education. (pp. 67-81). Dunedin, New Zealand: Otago University Press.

Sexton, S. S. (2015). Student teachers learning to think, know, feel and act like a teacher: The impact of a Master of Teaching and Learning programme. Educational Alternatives, 13, 72-85.

Kennedy, I., Smith, P., & Sexton, S. S. (2015). Ensuring New Zealand's future prosperity: A professional learning development initiative to bridge the gap between theory and practice. Science Education International, 26(1), 42-55.

Chapter in Book - Research

Sexton, S. S. (2017). In The New Zealand Curriculum: Is it science education or education through science? One educator's argument. In B. Akpan (Ed.), Science education: A global perspective. (pp. 219-233). Springer. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-32351-0_11

Sexton, S. (2015). How are teenage male students redefining masculinity and heterosexuality? In A. C. Gunn & L. A. Smith (Eds.), Sexual cultures in Aotearoa New Zealand education. (pp. 67-81). Dunedin, New Zealand: Otago University Press.

Sexton, S. S. (2013). Science education or education through science: Which is it in the New Zealand curriculum? In B. Akpan (Ed.), Science education: A global perspective. (pp. 146-161). Abuja, Nigeria: Next Generation Education.

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Journal - Research Article

Sexton, S. S. (2017). The intersection of self and school: How friendship circles influence heterosexual and self-identified queer teenage New Zealand boys' views on acceptable language and behavior. Gender & Education, 29(3), 299-312. doi: 10.1080/09540253.2016.1140722

Sexton, S. S. (2015). Student teachers learning to think, know, feel and act like a teacher: The impact of a Master of Teaching and Learning programme. Educational Alternatives, 13, 72-85.

Sexton, S. (2015). Teaching future teachers: A teacher educator's self-study in making science relevant, useful and meaningful for New Zealand pre-service teachers. Journal of Education in Science, Environment and Health, 1(1), 10-19.

Kennedy, I., Smith, P., & Sexton, S. S. (2015). Ensuring New Zealand's future prosperity: A professional learning development initiative to bridge the gap between theory and practice. Science Education International, 26(1), 42-55.

Sexton, S. (2015). Embracing diversity in science education. New Zealand Science Teacher, 134, 48-50.

Sexton, S. S. (2015). The feminisation of teacher education. Language, Individual & Society, 9, 173-182.

Haig, B., & Sexton, S. S. (2014). Primary students' perceptions of good teachers. Set: Research Information for Teachers, 3, 22-28.

Sexton, S., Atkinson, J., & Goodson, R. (2013). Narratives of place: Provisional teachers' experiences in science. Science Education International, 24(3), 361-376.

Sexton, S. (2013). Education through science. New Zealand Science Teacher, 132, 30-35.

Sexton, S., & Penrice, G. (2013). Engaging primary students through science action research. New Zealand Science Teacher, 132, 59-61.

Sexton, S. (2012). Queer Otago secondary students' views of their schooling environment. New Zealand Journal of Educational Studies, 47(1), 93-106.

Sexton, S. S. (2012). The other side of the chalk face: Students' perceptions of teachers. Global Education Review, 1(1), 59-68.

Sexton, S. S. (2011). Transformative praxis in teacher practice: One tauira finds her place in education. Compare, 41(1), 59-74. doi: 10.1080/03057925.2010.517662

Sexton, S. (2010). Putting it all together: Action research in teaching practice. Waikato Journal of Education, 15(1), 135-144.

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Journal - Research Other

Sexton, S. S. (2016). [Review of the books Men teaching children 3-11: Dismantling gender barriers and Men, masculinities and teaching in early childhood education: International perspectives on gender and care]. Gender & Education. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/09540253.2016.1170326

Sexton, S. S. (2015). [Review of the book Inequalities in the teaching profession: A global perspective]. Gender & Education, 27(5), 579-581. doi: 10.1080/09540253.2015.1019991

Sexton, S. S. (2013). [Review of the book The declining significance of homophobia: How teenage boys are redefining masculinity and heterosexuality]. Gender & Education, 25(5), 661. doi: 10.1080/09540253.2013.816822

Sexton, S. S. (2013). [Review of the books Changing gay male identities and Men speak out: Views on gender, sex, and power]. Gender & Education, 26(2), 188-192. doi: 10.1080/09540253.2013.847578

Sexton, S. S., Facer, R., & Ross, C. (2013). Relevant, useful, and meaningful learning opportunities in science using Building Science Concepts. Curriculum Matters, 9, 82-101.

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Conference Contribution - Published proceedings: Full paper

Sexton, S. S. (2012). Construction of a turbine from e-waste: A project of the new scientists. In D. Mogari, A. Mji & U. I. Ogbonnaya (Eds.), Proceedings of the Institute for Science and Technology Education (ISTE) International Conference on Mathematics, Science and Technology Education: Towards Effective Teaching and Meaningful Learning in Mathematics, Science and Technology. [CD-ROM], (pp. 569-582). Pretoria, South Africa: Unisa Press. [Full Paper]

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Conference Contribution - Published proceedings: Abstract

Sexton, S. (2014). Teaching the future teachers: Making science relevant, useful and meaningful for New Zealand pre-service teachers. Proceedings of the International Conference on Education in Mathematics, Science & Technology (ICEMST). Retrieved from http://www.icemst.com/

Sexton, S. (2014). Realistic teacher education in New Zealand: A master of teaching and learning degree's influence in teacher efficacy. In G. T. Papanikos (Ed.), Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual International Conference on Education. (pp. 151). Athens, Greece: Athens Institute for Education and Research. [Abstract]

Sexton, S. (2014). Three sides of the same coin! How the New Zealand Curriculum's nature of science and the nature of science pedagogy support and reflect the curriculum's effective pedagogy. Proceedings of the New Zealand Association of Science Educators (NZASE) Science Conference (SciCon). Retrieved from http://wired.ivvy.com/event/AKB002/

Sexton, S. (2014). How male Otago teenage students are redefining masculinity and heterosexuality. Proceedings of the Gender and Education in the Asia Pacific: possibilities and Provocations. (pp. 64). Retrieved from http://education.unimelb.edu.au/news_and_activities/events/upcoming_events/conferences/GEA2014#papers

Sexton, S. (2013). Overcoming barriers to teaching science in primary education. Proceedings of the World Conference on Science and Technology Education. (pp. 265). Retrieved from http://worldste2013.org/

Sexton, S. (2013). Exploring the ‘wow’, the what and the why in primary science [Promoting primary level STEM education: ICASE Symposium]. Proceedings of the World Conference on Science and Technology Education. (pp. 306). Retrieved from http://worldste2013.org/

Sexton, S. (2013). Relevant, useful and meaningful science for primary/ECE/elementary schools on a minimal budget. Proceedings of the World Conference on Science and Technology Education. (pp. 266). Retrieved from http://worldste2013.org/

Sexton, S. (2013). Publishing with students: Getting their voice out there. In J. McDonald, S.-K. Loke, A. McLean & M. Rajoo (Eds.), Proceedings of the Spotlight on Teaching and Learning Colloquium. (pp. 36). Dunedin, New Zealand: HEDC, University of Otago. [Abstract]

Penrice, G., & Sexton, S. (2012). Discourses of rural primary school science. Proceedings of the New Zealand Association of Science Educators (NZASE) Science Conference (SciCon): Making Connections. Retrieved from http://www.scicon2012.org.nz/

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Conference Contribution - Verbal presentation and other Conference outputs

Sexton, S. (2015, September). Student teachers learning to think, know, feel and act like a teacher: The impact of a Master of Teaching and Learning programme. Verbal presentation at the Education, Research & Development Sixth International Conference, Elenite, Bulgaria.

Sexton, S. (2015, September). The feminisation of teacher education. Verbal presentation at the Language, Individual & Society 9th International Conference, Elenite, Bulgaria.

Sexton, S. (2013, November). How and why the New Zealand curriculum is education through science. Verbal presentation at the New Zealand Association for Research in Education (NZARE) National Conference: Creativity in Research: Generative Inquiries for Educational Futures, Dunedin, New Zealand.

Sexton, S. (2011, April). Reality bites: Queer New Zealand secondary students' views of teachers and teaching. Verbal presentation at the 8th International Gender and Education Association Conference: Gender and Education: Past, Present and Future, Exeter, UK.

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