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GEOL374 Metamorphism and Metamorphic Mineralisation

Purpose

This paper provides an introduction to metamorphism and associated mineralisation. The ultimate goal is to provide the skills and knowledge to be able to recognise and interpret the significance of a metamorphic rock and any associated mineralisation.

Content

Amphibolite facies gneisses in Fiordland Amphibolite facies gneisses in Fiordland

The paper covers a spectrum of metamorphic types, including dislocation, contact, burial, regional and ultra-high-pressure. All types are discussed with reference to examples of metamorphic terranes from around the world, although the focus will be on the spectacular New Zealand geology. In particular, the course will cover the metamorphic evolution of both Western and Eastern Provinces of New Zealand, with tectonic syntheses of the Alpine Fault, metamorphic core complexes in the Western Province, the granulite facies Western Fiordland Orthogneiss, burial metamorphism of the Murihiku sequence, and formation of the Rangitata Orogen. We will examine the petrology and metamorphic reactions that take place in the shallow crust (e.g., zeolites) through to deep crust (e.g., eclogites), as well as the largest metamorphic complex on Earth: the upper mantle. Metamorphic facies classification and basic quantitative geothermobarometry are explained. For metamorphic mineralisation, we will examine the formation of mesothermal gold deposits, massive sulphide deposits, skarns and diamond occurrences. The course is structured so that the lectures and labs are integrated.

Background requirements

Basic chemistry and numeracy.

Teaching staff

Dr James Scott

Format

Second semester, 24 lectures, Wednesday 8/12, 12 laboratories (Wed pm and Thur am (repeated))

Fieldwork

1 day field excursion to the Murihiku, Caples and Haast Schists, south of Dunedin.

Assessment

20% internal assignment, 20% practical examination, 60% final theory examination

Textbooks

Principles of Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology by JD Winter, Prentice Hall

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Details

Concepts and controls of metamorphism; chemical equilibrium and graphical portrayal of mineral assemblages; metamorphic grade and metamorphic facies; relationship between metamorphism and tectonics; New Zealand metamorphic rocks; metamorphic mineralisation.

Paper title Metamorphism and Metamorphic Mineralisation
Paper code GEOL374
Subject Geology
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Second Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $1,018.05
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $4,320.00

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Prerequisite
GEOL 251 and GEOL 252
Restriction
GEOL 274
Schedule C
Science
Contact
geology@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Co-ordinator: Dr James Scott
Dr Steven Smith
Paper Structure
This paper covers a spectrum of metamorphic types, including contact, regional and some of the metamorphic extremes, such as ultra-high-pressure and ultra-high-temperature. All types are discussed with reference to examples from around the world, although the focus will be on the spectacular New Zealand geology. We will examine metamorphic reactions that take place in the shallow crust (eg zeolite facies) through to deep crust (eg eclogite facies), as well as the largest metamorphic complex on Earth: the upper mantle. Metamorphic facies classification and basic geothermobarometry are explained. For metamorphic mineralisation, we will examine the formation of mesothermal gold deposits, massive sulphide deposits, skarns and diamond occurrences. The paper is structured so that the lectures and labs are integrated.
Textbooks
Text books are not required for this paper.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Interdisciplinary perspective, Lifelong learning, Research, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
To be able to reconstruct the metamorphic history of a rock, from the field to microscopic scale.

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Timetable

Second Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Wednesday 09:00-09:50 28-34, 36-41
Wednesday 12:00-12:50 28-34, 36-41

Practical

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
P1 Wednesday 14:00-16:50 28-34, 36-41
P2 Thursday 09:00-11:50 28-34, 36-41