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Professor Tony Ballantyne, FRSNZ

tony_ballantyne_humspvc
Professor Tony Ballantyne

Professor Tony Ballantyne, FRSNZ, is Pro-Vice-Chancellor Humanities at the University of Otago.

Academic qualifications

1999: PhD, Cambridge
1993: BA(Hons), University of Otago


Research interests

Tony is recognised as a world-leading historian of the modern British empire. He has worked extensively on the development of colonial knowledge, changing understandings of language, religion and race, and the uneven ‘webs’ of exchange and connection that gave the empire shape. He has developed many of these approaches and arguments through his work on the history of the colonial Punjab and the Punjabi diaspora.

In recent years much of his research has come to focus on the changing place of New Zealand within the British Empire. Some of this New Zealand-based research has been anthologised in a collection of essays, Webs of Empire, published by Bridget Williams Books in 2012 and the University of British Columbia in 2014. His most recent book is entitled Entanglements of Empire: Missionaries, Māori and the Question of the Body published by Duke University Press in 2014: Auckland University Press produced a New Zealand edition of this volume in 2015.

His current research primarily focuses on the development of colonial knowledge in southern New Zealand, a long-running project that was supported by a grant from the Marsden Fund of the Royal Society of New Zealand. He is currently working on a set of related monographs on this material, including a study of the collector and historian Herries Beattie and a volume examining debates over resource use and economic life in colonial Otago.

Tony has often worked collaboratively. He has a long-standing collaboration with Antoinette Burton from the University of Illinois. Their most recent work is Empires and The Reach of the Global, 1870-1945, published by Harvard University Press. They also have a co-edited volume entitled World Histories From Below: Dissent and Disruption due out with Bloomsbury Press in 2016.

In addition to serving as Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Tony also directs the University's Centre for Research on Colonial Culture. He was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand in 2012.

Editorial responsibilities

Tony is currently on the editorial boards of:

  • Journal of Punjab Studies
  • Journal of New Zealand Studies
  • Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History

Areas of research supervision

  • Colonial knowledge
  • Imperial networks
  • Print culture
  • Cultural and intellectual life in 19th century New Zealand, especially Otago and Southland

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Publications

Ballantyne, T. (2014). Entanglements of empire: Missionaries, Māori, and the question of the body. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 376p.

Ballantyne, T. (2012). Webs of Empire: Locating New Zealand's colonial past. Wellington, New Zealand: Bridget Williams Books, 374p.

Ballantyne, T., & Burton, A. (2012). Empires and the reach of the global: 1870-1945. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 240p.

Ballantyne, T. (2011). Paper, pen, and print: The transformation of the Kai Tahu knowledge order. Comparative Studies in Society & History, 53(2), 232-260. doi: 10.1017/S0010417511000041

Ballantyne, T. (2010). The changing shape of the modern British Empire and its historiography. Historical Journal, 53(2), 429-452. doi: 10.1017/S0018246X10000117

Authored Book - Research

Ballantyne, T. (2014). Entanglements of empire: Missionaries, Māori, and the question of the body. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 376p.

Ballantyne, T. (2012). Webs of Empire: Locating New Zealand's colonial past. Wellington, New Zealand: Bridget Williams Books, 374p.

Ballantyne, T., & Burton, A. (2012). Empires and the reach of the global: 1870-1945. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press, 240p.

Ballantyne, T. (2006). Between colonialism and diaspora: Sikh cultural formations in an Imperial world. Durham: Duke University Press, 229p.

Ballantyne, A. J. (2002). Orientalism and race: Aryanism in the British Empire. UK: Cambridge Imperial and Post-Colonial Study Series, Palgrave-MacMillan.

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Edited Book - Research

Ballantyne, T., & Burton, A. (Eds.). (2009). Moving subjects: Gender, mobility, and intimacy in an age of global empire. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 353p.

Ballantyne, T. (Ed.). (2007). Textures of the Sikh past: New historical perspectives. Oxford University Press, 328p.

Ballantyne, T., & Moloughney, B. (Eds.). (2006). Disputed histories: Imagining New Zealand's pasts. Dunedin, New Zealand: Otago University Press, 283p.

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Chapter in Book - Research

Ballantyne, T., & Burton, A. (2012). Empires and the reach of the global. In E. S. Rosenberg (Ed.), A world connecting: 1870-1945. (pp. 285-434). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Ballantyne, T. (2009). The State, politics and power, 1769-1893. In G. Byrnes (Ed.), The new Oxford history of New Zealand. (pp. 99-124). Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University Press Australia & New Zealand.

Ballantyne, T., & Burton, A. (2009). Introduction: The politics of intimacy in an age of empire. In T. Ballantyne & A. Burton (Eds.), Moving subjects: Gender, mobility, and intimacy in an age of global empire. (pp. 1-30). Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press.

Ballantyne, T. (2008). Colonial knowledge. In S. Stockwell (Ed.), The British empire: Themes and perspectives. (pp. 177-198). Malden, MA: Blackwell.

Ballantyne, T. (2007). What difference does colonialism make? Reassessing print and social change in an age of global imperialism. In S. Alcorn Baron, E. N. Lindquist & E. F. Shevlin (Eds.), Agent of change: Print culture studies after Elizabeth L. Eisenstein. (pp. 342-352). Washington, DC: University of Massachusetts Press.

Ballantyne, T., & Moloughney, B. (2006). Asia in Murihiku: Towards a transnational history of colonial culture. In T. Ballantyne & B. Moloughney (Eds.), Disputed histories: Imagining New Zealand's pasts. (pp. 65-92). Dunedin, New Zealand: Otago University Press.

Ballantyne, T. (2006). Teaching Māori about Asia: Print culture and community identity in nineteenth-century New Zealand. In H. Johnson & B. Moloughney (Eds.), Asia in the making of New Zealand. (pp. 13-35). Auckland University Press.

Ballantyne, T. (2005). Mr. Peal's archive: Mobility and exchange in histories of empire. In A. Burton (Ed.), Archive stories: Facts, fictions, and the writing of history. (pp. 87-110). Durham, UK: Duke University Press.

Ballantyne, T. (2005). Putting the nation in its place?: World history and C. A. Bayly's The birth of the modern world. In A. Curthoys & M. Lake (Eds.), Connected worlds: History in transnational perspective. (pp. 23-44). Canberra, Australia: ANU E Press.

Ballantyne, T. J. (2003). Rereading the archive and opening up the nation-state: Colonial knowledge in South Asia (and beyond). In A. Burton (Ed.), After the imperial turn: Thinking with and through the nation. (pp. 102-121). Durham: Duke University Press.

Ballantyne, T. (2002). Empire, knowledge and culture: From proto-globalization to modern globalization. In A. G. Hopkins (Ed.), Globalization in World History. (pp. 116-140). New York: W. W. Norton & Company.

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Journal - Research Article

Ballantyne, T. (2014). Empires, modernisation and modernities. International Journal for History, Culture and Modernity, 2(1), 25-42. doi: 10.5117/HCM2014.1.BAll

Ballantyne, T. (2011). On place, space and mobility in nineteenth-century New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of History, 45(1), 50-70.

Ballantyne, T. (2011). Paper, pen, and print: The transformation of the Kai Tahu knowledge order. Comparative Studies in Society & History, 53(2), 232-260. doi: 10.1017/S0010417511000041

Ballantyne, T. (2011). Reading the newspaper in colonial Otago. Journal of New Zealand Studies, (12), 47-63.

Ballantyne, T. (2010). The changing shape of the modern British Empire and its historiography. Historical Journal, 53(2), 429-452. doi: 10.1017/S0018246X10000117

Ballantyne, T. (2010). Thinking local: Knowledge, sociability and community in Gore's intellectual life, 1875-1914. New Zealand Journal of History, 44(2), 138-156.

Ballantyne, T. (2010). Placing literary culture: Books and civic culture in Milton. Journal of New Zealand Literature, 28(2), 82-104.

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Journal - Research Other

Ballantyne, T. (2005). Religion, differeence, and the limits of British imperial history. Victorian Studies, 47(3), 427-456.

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