Otago Irish Studies

Postgraduate Students

 

Leila Crawford

Email: crale374@student.otago.ac.nzLeila Crawford

Leila is a PhD candidate in the Irish Studies programme. Originally from New England, Leila has a BA with honours in English from Williams College, where she did a senior thesis on James Joyce and the sea. After spending a year working at the James Joyce Centre in Dublin, Leila completed a M. Phil at Cambridge where she left Joyce behind and wrote on the New England-based poetry of T.S. Eliot, Charles Olson and Elizabeth Bishop. She has now returned to Irish Studies and is working on an analysis of the ways in which Seamus Heaney's poetry uses the Irish landscape to engage with the past. When she's not thinking about Irish bogs and fields, Leila enjoys spending time in the Otago region's beautiful scenery, tramping and cross country skiing, and snuggling with her cat, Freya.

Majella Cullinane

Email: culma285@otago.ac.nz

Majella CullinaneMajella Cullinane is a PhD candidate at the Centre for Irish and Scottish Studies. Originally fromLimerick, Ireland, Majella has a BA in English and Italian from University College Dublin, and a HDip in ELT from the University of Limerick. After graduating, she taught English in Spain, Greece, the UK and Ireland, and New Zealand. In 2001, she completed a Masters in Publishing at Oxford Brookes University. Majella has worked as an editor and manuscript assessor, and continues to do the latter for the New Zealand Society of Authors. She has previously received a Sean Dunne Writer’s Award for Poetry, the Hennessy XO/Sunday Tribune Literary Award for Emerging Poetry, and also an Irish Arts Council Award to study for an MLitt. in Creative Writing at St. Andrew’s University Scotland in 2006, and was runner up in the Landfall Essay Competition in 2012. In 2014, she was awarded the Robert Burns Fellowship at the University of Otago. She has been short-listed for awards in historical fiction, short stories and essays, and has previously held Fellowship and Writer-in-Residence positions in Ireland and Scotland. In 2011, she published her first poetry collection Guarding the Flame with Salmon Poetry, Ireland. She’s currently working on a collection of short stories, and her 2nd poetry collection. She lives in Port Chalmers with her partner Andrew, and their son Robbie. In her free time, she loves to travel, go tramping and cycling, and her new found passion is swimming.

Aindrias Hirt

Andreas Hirt

Email:aindrias.hirt@yahoo.com

Aindrias Hirt is a PhD candidate jointly in the Irish and Scottish Studies and Music programmes. Andy has a BSc degree in Physics with a minor in Mathematics, a BA in Celtic Studies (First Class Honours), an MMus in Vocal Performance in Opera, and recently an MA in Celtic Studies from St. Francis Xavier University in Nova Scotia, Canada. His Masters thesis was entitled Narrative Song Rhythm in the Lays of Fionn mac Cumhaill: Performance Practices and Insights into Medieval Gaelic Heroic Song. He is extending this work here through rhythmic and pitch analysis of extant recorded narrative songs. Andy continues to perform regularly in opera, musical theatre, oratorio, and in venues promoting Irish and Scottish Gaelic folk song.

Aindrias's publications include:

“The Devolution of the Shepherd Trumpet and Its Seminal Importance in Music History.” International Trumpet Guild Journal. January, (2015): 7-16, 40.

Addendum to “The Devolution of the Shepherd Trumpet and Its Seminal Importance in Music History.” Special Supplement to the ITG [International Trumpet Guild] Journal. January, (2015): 1-23. Article has been published online: http://www.trumpetguild.org/pdf/2015journal/201501ShepherdAddendum.pdf

Burke, Mòrag. Dia nan Gràsan: Laoidhean Ùra Gàidhlig (God of the Graces: New Gaelic Hymns). Antigonish, Nova Scotia: Shepherd Publishing, 2014. Publishing, musical, layout, and graphical editing by Aindrias Hirt. ISMN 979-0-9001482-0-9

“The Connection Between Fenian Lays, Liturgical Chant, Recitative, and Dán Díreach: a Pre- Medieval Narrative Song Tradition,” Proceedings from Seventh Australian Conference of Celtic Studies. The University of Sydney, September–October 2010. ISBN: 978-1-74210-234-4 http://www.academia.edu/715967/The_Connection_Between_Fenian_Lays_Liturgical_Chant_Recitative_and_Dan_Direach_a_Pre-Medieval_Narrative_Song_Tradition

Musical editor of The Celtic Lyre (reprint 1898). Published May, 2012 by Sìol Cultural Enterprises; a song-book of 68 vernacular tunes. ISBN: 978-0-9869659-6-8. Sample and Preface: http://www.academia.edu/1536150/The_Celtic_Lyre-Preface

"The Origin of the European Folk Music Scale: A New Theory", Ethnomusicology Review. University California at Los Angeles (UCLA), September, 2013: http://ethnomusicologyreview.ucla.edu/content/origin-european-folk-music-scale-new-theory

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Recent graduates

 

Please visit OUR Archive for details on the theses of these graduates.

 

 

 

Daniel Davy

Daniel Davy

Email: davda950@student.otago.ac.nz

Daniel Davy was a PhD candidate in History and Scottish and Irish Studies. He completed his Master's degree at the University of Edinburgh. His doctoral dissertation deals with various articulations of masculinity among British and Irish goldminers in the Otago goldfields during the nineteenth century. In his free time, Daniel enjoys baseball, football, rugby, and tramping.

 

 

Erin Grant

Email: graer238@student.otago.ac.nz

Erin Grant

Erin Grant was a PhD candidate in the History and Scottish Studies programmes. As a Canadian of Scottish descent, she is originally from British Columbia, though she has spent half of her life in Ontario, Canada where she received her BA (Hons) in History as well as her MA in History and Scottish Studies at the University of Guelph. Her doctoral research looked at gender issues in pipe band communities, and explored identity and expression in New Zealand as part of the Scottish Diaspora. Erin is an accomplished musician who has much experience of playing the Great Highland Bagpipe at top-level competitions both in North America and Scotland. She also enjoys hiking, canoeing, and many other outdoor sports.

 

 

 

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Kerri Haggart

Kerri Haggart

Email: hagke061@student.otago.ac.nz

Kerri Haggart was a PhD candidate in the Irish Studies Programme. She completed her BA with First Class Honours in English at the University of Otago in 2010. Her PhD thesis, titled “Bloom's Situated Mind in James Joyce's Ulysses: Decoding Character in a Social Storyworld” is a theoretical examination of characterisation that draws from concepts relevant to the cognitive sciences, sociolinguistics and the social sciences. Her research aims to demonstrate how Joyce’s characters are built through cultural and cognitive frames and to outline how this approach accords new insight into characterisation. When she is not studiously immersed in Joyce’s Ulysses, Kerri enjoys running, playing netball, swimming, yoga, reading and writing.

 

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Jared Lesser

Jared Lesser

Email: jmlesser@msn.com

Jared Lesser was a PhD candidate in the Irish Studies programme. He completed an Honours thesis at the University of New South Wales titled Pure Difference: A Reading of the Mythologised Jew and James Joyce’s 'Ulysses' in which he explored the role of mythologised configurations of Jewishness in Joyce’s critique of binary logics in politics and race. His research seeks to redeem ‘the body’ in Joyce’s writing by reading the author’s work through the lens of current sociological, philosophical and psychoanalytical debates surrounding the body. Jared’s other research interests include race discourse, and critical theory; with a particular interest in the writing of Slavoj Žižek.

 

 

 

Ruth Macklin

Ruth Macklin


Email: macru053@student.otago.ac.nz

Ruth Macklin was an MA candidate at the Centre for Irish and Scottish Studies. She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics and English at the University of Otago, where she researched corrupted xenia in Aeschylus’ Agamemnon before completing her English dissertation titled ‘Rage and Narrative in Brendan Kennelly’s Medea.’ Ruth’s master’s research explored the relationship between Seamus Heaney’s poetry and his criticism, concentrating on the development and function of Heaney’s critical notion of redress. Her interest in languages, especially Latin and Ancient Greek, complements her study of Heaney.

 

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Ailbhe McDaid

Ailbhe McDaid

Email: mcdal522@student.otago.ac.nz

Ailbhe McDaid was a PhD candidate at the Centre for Irish and Scottish Studies. She is originally from Cork, Ireland and graduated from University College Cork with a BA (Hons) in English and Irish. Ailbhe took an MPhil in Anglo-Irish Literature at Trinity College Dublin in 2006. Her doctoral research concentrated on the migration impulse in Irish poetry since the 1970s, with particular focus on representations of identity, belonging and home. She has given a series of talks on poetry in English and Irish to Cumann Gaeilge na hAstráile/Irish Language Association of Australia and has an essay forthcoming in a collection commissioned by University of Melbourne Irish Studies Seminar Sessions. Ailbhe is a fluent Irish language speaker and former Leas-Uachtarán/Vice-President of Cumann Gaeilge na hAstráile. Ailbhe enjoys outdoor activities such as running, cycling and tramping, and less vigorous hobbies like cooking and reading.

 

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