Accessibility Skip to Global Navigation Skip to Local Navigation Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Site Map Menu

Professor Mark Henaghan

BA, LLB (Hons)

staff_large_henaghan_mark_caption

Research Interests

Family Law, Law Relating to Children (custody/access, child abuse, medico-legal issues) Human Genome Law, Relationship Property, The Judiciary and judge-made Law

Contact

If you wish to make an appointment with me please contact my Personal Assistant Karen Warrington, +64 3 479 8897, karen.warrington@otago.ac.nz

Tel +64 3 479 8856
Email mark.henaghan@otago.ac.nz

^ Top of page

Publications

Henaghan, M., Atkin, B., Clarkson, D., Caldwell, J., Swadling, K., & Ballantyne, R. (2015). Family law in New Zealand (17th ed.). Wellington, New Zealand: LexisNexis, 1370p.

Henaghan, M. (2011). Health professionals and trust: The cure for healthcare law and policy. New York: Routledge-Cavendish, 148p.

Henaghan, M., & Atkin, B. (Eds.). (2013). Family law policy in New Zealand (4th ed.). Wellington, New Zealand: LexisNexis, 423p.

Henaghan, M. (2015). Family law and the Supreme Court of New Zealand: A ten-year affair. In A. Stockley & M. Littlewood (Eds.), The New Zealand Supreme Court: The first ten years. (pp. 441-478). Wellington, New Zealand: NexisLexis NZ.

Henaghan, M. (2015). Michael Freeman's contribution to childhood rights. In Law in society: Reflections on children, family, culture and philosophy: Essays in honour of Michael Freeman. (pp. 191-202). Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill.

Authored Book - Research

Henaghan, M., Atkin, B., Clarkson, D., Caldwell, J., Swadling, K., & Ballantyne, R. (2015). Family law in New Zealand (17th ed.). Wellington, New Zealand: LexisNexis, 1370p.

Henaghan, M. (2011). Health professionals and trust: The cure for healthcare law and policy. New York: Routledge-Cavendish, 148p.

^ Top of page

Edited Book - Research

Henaghan, M., & Wall, J. (Eds.). (2016). Law, ethics, and medicine: Essays in honour of Peter Skegg. Wellington, New Zealand: Thomson Reuters, 309p.

Griffiths, S., Henaghan, M., & Rodriguez Ferrere, M. B. (Eds.). (2016). The search for certainty: Essays in honour of John Smillie. Wellington, New Zealand: Thomson Reuters, 235p.

Henaghan, M., & Atkin, B. (Eds.). (2013). Family law policy in New Zealand (4th ed.). Wellington, New Zealand: LexisNexis, 423p.

^ Top of page

Chapter in Book - Research

Henaghan, M. (2016). The Smillie Method: A tribute to Professor John Smillie's legal scholarship. In S. Griffiths, M. Henaghan & M. B. Rodriguez Ferrere (Eds.), The search for certainty: Essays in honour of John Smillie. (pp. 166-179). Wellington, New Zealand: Thomson Reuters.

Henaghan, M., Ballantyne, R., & Helm, D. (2016). Genes versus gestation: Protecting the interests of surrogate mothers. In M. Henaghan & J. Wall (Eds.), Law, ethics, and medicine: Essays in honour of Peter Skegg. (pp. 266-292). Wellington, New Zealand: Thomson Reuters.

Henaghan, M. (2016). Children's rights and social justice: An analysis of Anne B. Smith's contribution. In C. Dalli & A. Meade (Eds.), Research, policy and advocacy in the early years: Writing inspired by the achievements of professor Anne Smith. (pp. 72-85). Wellington, New Zealand: NZCER Press.

Henaghan, M. (2016). Final appeals courts and article 3 of the United Nations convention on the rights of the child: What do the best interests of the particular child have to do with it? In E. E. Sutherland & L.-A. B. MacFarlane (Eds.), Implementing article 3 of the United Nations convention on the rights of the child: Best interests, welfare and well-being. (pp. 81-96). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Henaghan, M. (2015). The human genome revolution: Sheila McLean's quest for intellectual rigour and reproductive liberty. In P. R. Ferguson & G. T. Laurie (Eds.), Inspiring medico-legal revolution: Essays in honour of Sheila McLean. (pp. 215-227). Farnham, UK: Ashgate.

Henaghan, M., & Ballantyne, R. (2015). New Zealand: Recent changes to the division of relationship property in New Zealand: A new way forward? In B. Atkin (Ed.), International survey of family law. (pp. 229-245). Bristol, UK: Jordan.

Henaghan, M. (2015). Michael Freeman's contribution to childhood rights. In Law in society: Reflections on children, family, culture and philosophy: Essays in honour of Michael Freeman. (pp. 191-202). Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill.

Henaghan, M. (2015). Family law and the Supreme Court of New Zealand: A ten-year affair. In A. Stockley & M. Littlewood (Eds.), The New Zealand Supreme Court: The first ten years. (pp. 441-478). Wellington, New Zealand: NexisLexis NZ.

Henaghan, M., & Ballantyne, R. (2015). Children's dispute resolution: A New Zealand perspective. In K. Lynch & A. Scully-Hill (Eds.), International perspectives on disputes about children and child protection: Collected essays on parental responsibility and children's dispute resolution. (pp. 137-159). Hong Kong, China: Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Henaghan, M. (2014). Indigenous people, emerging research, and global health. In M. Freeman, S. Hawkes & B. Bennett (Eds.), Law and global health. (pp. 182-192). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Henaghan, M., & Ballantyne, R. (2014). International child abduction, intercountry adoption and international commercial surrogacy. In J. Eekelaar & R. George (Eds.), Routledge handbook of family law and policy. (pp. 383-400). Abingdon, UK: Routledge.

Henaghan, M. (2014). Grandparents who care for grandchildren. In K. Diesfeld & I. McIntosh (Eds.), Elder law in New Zealand. (pp. 553-578). Wellington, New Zealand: Thomson Reuters.

Henaghan, M., & Ballantyne, R. (2014). New Zealand: Child poverty in New Zealand: Definitions, consequences, and possible legislative responses. In B. Atkin (Ed.), International survey of family law. (pp. 376-394). Bristol, UK: Family Law.

Henaghan, M. (2013). Legally defining the family. In M. Henaghan & B. Atkin (Eds.), Family law policy in New Zealand. (4th ed.) (pp. 1-56). Wellington, New Zealand: LexisNexis.

Henaghan, M., Daniels, K., & Caldwell, J. (2013). Family law policy and assisted human reproduction. In M. Henaghan & B. Atkin (Eds.), Family law policy in New Zealand. (4th ed.) (pp. 251-306). Wellington, New Zealand: LexisNexis.

Henaghan, M., & Cleary, T. (2013). The state in action: An insider's view of how the state regulates the use of PGD with HLA tissue-typing in New Zealand. In S. A. M. Mclean & S. Elliston (Eds.), Regulating of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis: A comparative and theoretical analysis. (pp. 199-223). Abingdon, UK: Routledge.

Henaghan, M. (2013). Legally rearranging families: Parents and children after break-up. In M. Henaghan & B. Atkin (Eds.), Family law policy in New Zealand. (4th ed.) (pp. 307-414). Wellington, New Zealand: LexisNexis.

Henaghan, M., & Ballantyne, R. (2013). New Zealand: 2013: A time of change in New Zealand family law: Marriage equality, international surrogacy and ongoing changes to the family court. In B. Atkin & F. Banda (Eds.), International survey of family law. (pp. 291-304). Bristol, UK: Family Law.

Henaghan, M., & Rouch, K. (2012). Neuroscience and the law in New Zealand. In T. M. Spranger (Ed.), International neurolaw: A comparative analysis. (pp. 257-267). Berlin, Germany: Springer.

Henaghan, M. (2012). Why judges need to know and understand childhood studies. In M. Freeman (Ed.), Law and childhood studies: Current legal issues 2011 (Vol. 14). (pp. 39-54). Oxford University Press.

Henaghan, M. (2012). New Zealand: The changing politics of family law in New Zealand. In B. Atkin & F. Banda (Eds.), International survey of family law. (pp. 253-270). Bristol, UK: Family Law.

Henaghan, M. (2011). Discretion, status and money: The essence of family law in New Zealand. In B. Atkin (Ed.), The international survey of family law: 2011 edition. (pp. 281-301). Bristol, UK: Family Law.

Henaghan, M. (2010). New Zealand: How New Zealand family law deals with power imbalances. In B. Atkin (Ed.), International survey of family law: 2010 edition. (pp. 237-254). Bristol, UK: Family Law.

^ Top of page

Journal - Research Article

Henaghan, M., & Ballantyne, R. (2015). Bill Atkin: A fierce defender of children's rights and proponent of child-focused legislation. Victoria University of Wellington Law Review, 46(3), 591-609.

Henaghan, M., & Ballantyne, R. (2015). Child poverty in New Zealand: A contravention of Articles 6 and 27 of the Convention of the Rights of the Child. Stellenbosch Law Review, 26(2), 380-398.

Sanders, J., Munford, R., Liebenberg, L., & Henaghan, M. (2014). Show some emotion? Emotional dilemmas in undertaking research with vulnerable youth. Field Methods, 26(3), 239-251. doi: 10.1177/1525822X13516842

Badzek, L., Henaghan, M., Turner, M., & Monsen, R. (2013). Ethical, legal, and social issues in the translation of genomics into health care. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 45(1), 15-24. doi: 10.1111/jnu.12000

Wee, R., Henaghan, M., & Winship, I. (2013). Dynamic consent in the digital age of biology: Online initiatives and regulatory considerations. Journal of Primary Health Care, 5(4), 341-347.

Henaghan, M. (2013). International commercial surrogacy and the judiciary. International Family Law, (July), 198-201.

Atkin, B., Caldwell, J., Henaghan, M., & Tapp, P. (2013). Fifty years of New Zealand family law. New Zealand Universities Law Review, 25(4), 645-666.

Nie, L., Anderson, L., & Henaghan, M. (2012). Surrogacy and s 2(a)(ii): Interpreting the "medical condition" requirement in ACART's Guidelines on Surrogacy Arrangements involving Providers of Fertility Services (2007). New Zealand Family Law Journal, (March), 130-134.

Peart, N., Henaghan, M., & Kelly, G. (2011). Trusts and relationship property in New Zealand. Trusts & Trustees, 17(9), 866-882. doi: 10.1093/tandt/ttr111

Henaghan, M. (2011). The changes to final appeals in New Zealand since the creation of the New Zealand Supreme Court. Otago Law Review, 12(3), 579-604.

Henaghan, M. (2011). Relocation cases: The rhetoric and the reality of a child's best interests: A view from the bottom of the world. Child & Family Law Quarterly, 23(2), 226-250.

Robinson, A., & Henaghan, M. (2011). Children: Heard but not listened to? An analysis of children's views under s 6 of the Care of Children's Act 2004. New Zealand Family Law Journal, 7(2), 39-52.

Righarts, S., & Henaghan, M. (2011). Delays in the New Zealand civil justice system? Opinion v fact. Otago Law Review, 12(3), 455-471.

Henaghan, M. (2010). To relocate or not relocate. Journal of Family Law & Practice, 1(2), 30-50.

Taylor, N., Gollop, M., & Henaghan, M. (2010). Relocation following parental separation in New Zealand: Complexity and diversity. International Family Law, (March), 97-105.

Righarts, S., & Henaghan, M. (2010). Public perceptions of the New Zealand court system: An empirical approach to law reform. Otago Law Review, 12(2), 329-344.

Henaghan, M., & Ballantyne, R. (2010). Legal responses to violence in the home in New Zealand. University of New South Wales Law Journal, 33(3), 870-894.

^ Top of page

Journal - Research Other

Henaghan, M., & Buck, L. (2017). To return, or not to return, that is the question: A UK–New Zealand comparison of approaches to ‘internal abduction’ cases. Journal of Social Welfare & Family Law, 39(1), 102-105. doi: 10.1080/09649069.2016.1272783

Cornwall, J., Slatter, T., Guilford, P., Print, C. G., Henaghan, M., & Wee, R. (2014). Culture, law, ethics, and social implications: Is society ready for advanced genomic medicine? Australasian Medical Journal, 7(4), 200-202. doi: 10.4066/amj.2014.2069

Henaghan, M. (2013). Why we need legislation to address child poverty. Policy Quarterly, 9(2), 30-34.

^ Top of page

Commissioned Report for External Body

Sanders, J., Munford, R., Liebenberg, L., Jalota, N., Severinsen, C., Swift, D., Prujean, B., Ballantyne, R., & Henaghan, M. (2016). Young females in the court system. Commissioned by the Principal Youth Court Judge. Palmerston North, New Zealand: School of Social Work, Massey University. 34p.

Gollop, M., Taylor, N., & Henaghan, M. (2015). Evaluation of the 2014 Family Law Reforms: Phase one. Commissioned by New Zealand Law Foundation. Dunedin, New Zealand: Children's Issues Centre, University of Otago. 55p.

More publications...