Accessibility Skip to Global Navigation Skip to Local Navigation Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Site Map Menu

Dr Lucy Wing (née Jack)

Lecturer & Marsden Fast Start Research Fellow

Contact Detailslucywing

Office: 310 Castle Street, room 145
Tel: 64 3 479 8307
Email: lucy.wing@otago.ac.nz

Academic Qualifications

BSc Hons, Edinburgh
PhD, University of Otago

Research Interests

  • Food web structure and population connectivity for conservation of temperate marine systems

I am an ecologist who has used direct observations, field sampling and environmental chemistry to study marine processes. My research interests have focused on understanding how physical processes drive productivity and carbon flux in impacted versus pristine marine systems. These studies have employed stable isotopes as natural tags for food web structure determination. I have also investigated metapopulation dynamics and animal movements using trace elemental natural tags that I have developed for rock lobsters Jasus edwardsii. I am an NZOSH certified scientific diver and with this I have conducted extensive underwater visual censuses and videogrammetric surveys in remote areas for the assessment of rock lobster size structure, the structure of fish and invertebrate communities. In addition I have developed a strong skills base in multivariate statistical techniques for measuring change in these communities. I have applied this knowledge in the assessment of marine reserves in the Fiordland Marine Area for the conservation of intact ecosystems and biodiversity.

Research Projects

  • Does bioaccumulation of iron by seabirds enhance productivity around sub-Antarctic islands?
    This Marsden funded project (Principal Investigator: Stephen Wing) aims use biogeochemical markers to quantify the importance of seabirds in sustaining nearshore productivity around New Zealand's sub-Antarctic islands and Antarctica.
  • You can't go home again: forensic evidence for changes in ecosystem function following mainland extinction of pinnipeds.
    This Marsden funded project (Principal Investigator: Lucy Wing (née Jack)) uses forensic analysis of a time-series of fur seal and sea lion bones from archaeological deposits to describe the structure of prehistoric marine food webs and to track changes in ecosystem structure, from the advent of human exploitation in New Zealand to the modern day.

Courses

MARI 202 Marine Invertebrate Ecology and Biology
MARI 301 Marine Ecology
MARI 401 Advanced Methods in Marine Science

Postgraduate Students

Alex Connolly - Thesis Title (MSc): Identifying shifts in the trophic positions of coastal fish species associated with an increasing human population.

Marta Guerra - Thesis Title (PhD):Habitat use and foraging ecology of a declining population of sperm whales at Kaikoura, New Zealand

Susan Wells - Thesis Title (MSc):How has the coastal marine ecosystem of Otago changed since human arrival in New Zealand?

^ Top of page

Publications

Wing, S. R., Wing, L. C., Shatova, O., & Van Hale, R. (2017). Marine micronutrient vectors: Seabirds, marine mammals and fishes egest high concentrations of bioactive metals in the subantarctic island ecosystem. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 563, 13-23. doi: 10.3354/meps11978

Shatova, O. A., Wing, S. R., Hoffmann, L. J., Wing, L. C., & Gault-Ringold, M. (2017). Phytoplankton community structure is influenced by seabird guano enrichment in the Southern Ocean. Estuarine, Coastal & Shelf Science, 191, 125-135. doi: 10.1016/j.ecss.2017.04.021

Wing, S. R., Gault-Ringold, M., Stirling, C. H., Wing, L. C., Shatova, O., & Frew, R. D. (2017). δ56Fe in seabird guano reveals extensive recycling of iron in the Southern Ocean ecosystem. Limnology & Oceanography. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1002/lno.10524

McMullin, R., Wing, S. R., Wing, L. C., & Shatova, O. (2017). Trophic position of Antarctic ice fishes reflects food web structure along a gradient in sea ice persistence. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 564, 87-98. doi: 10.3354/meps12031

Shatova, O., Wing, S. R., Gault-Ringold, M., Wing, L., & Hoffmann, L. J. (2016). Seabird guano enhances phytoplankton production in the Southern Ocean. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology & Ecology, 483, 74-87. doi: 10.1016/j.jembe.2016.07.004

Journal - Research Article

Wing, S. R., Wing, L. C., Shatova, O., & Van Hale, R. (2017). Marine micronutrient vectors: Seabirds, marine mammals and fishes egest high concentrations of bioactive metals in the subantarctic island ecosystem. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 563, 13-23. doi: 10.3354/meps11978

McMullin, R., Wing, S. R., Wing, L. C., & Shatova, O. (2017). Trophic position of Antarctic ice fishes reflects food web structure along a gradient in sea ice persistence. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 564, 87-98. doi: 10.3354/meps12031

Wing, S. R., Gault-Ringold, M., Stirling, C. H., Wing, L. C., Shatova, O., & Frew, R. D. (2017). δ56Fe in seabird guano reveals extensive recycling of iron in the Southern Ocean ecosystem. Limnology & Oceanography. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1002/lno.10524

Shatova, O. A., Wing, S. R., Hoffmann, L. J., Wing, L. C., & Gault-Ringold, M. (2017). Phytoplankton community structure is influenced by seabird guano enrichment in the Southern Ocean. Estuarine, Coastal & Shelf Science, 191, 125-135. doi: 10.1016/j.ecss.2017.04.021

Shatova, O., Wing, S. R., Gault-Ringold, M., Wing, L., & Hoffmann, L. J. (2016). Seabird guano enhances phytoplankton production in the Southern Ocean. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology & Ecology, 483, 74-87. doi: 10.1016/j.jembe.2016.07.004

Wing, S. R., & Wing, L. (2015). Ontogenetic shifts in resource use by the sea urchin Evechinus chloroticus across an ecotone. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 535, 177-184.

Wing, S. R., Wing, L. C., & Fujita, Y. (2015). Overthrowing a regime shift: Displacement of sea urchins by abalone in a kelp forest ecosystem. Ecosphere, 6(12), 1-13. doi: 10.1890/ES15-00179.1

Wing, S. R., & Jack, L. (2014). Fiordland: The ecological basis for ecosystem management. New Zealand Journal of Marine & Freshwater Research, 48(4), 577-593. doi: 10.1080/00288330.2014.897636

Wing, S. R., Jack, L., Shatova, O., Leichter, J. J., Barr, D., Frew, R. D., & Gault-Ringold, M. (2014). Seabirds and marine mammals redistribute bioavailable iron in the Southern Ocean. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 510, 1-13. doi: 10.3354/meps10923

Jack, L., & Wing, S. R. (2013). A safety network against regional population collapse: Mature subpopulations in refuges distributed across the landscape. Ecosphere, 4(5), 57. doi: 10.1890/ES12-00221.1

Wing, S. R., & Jack, L. (2013). Marine reserve networks conserve biodiversity by stabilizing communities and maintaining food web structure. Ecosphere, 4(11), 135. doi: 10.1890/ES13-00257.1

Wing, S. R., Beer, N. A., & Jack, L. (2012). Resource base of blue cod Parapercis colias subpopulations in marginal fjordic habitats is linked to chemoautotrophic production. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 466, 205-214. doi: 10.3354/meps09929

Wing, S., & Jack, L. (2012). Resource specialisation among suspension-feeding invertebrates on rock walls in Fiordland, New Zealand, is driven by water column structure and feeding mode. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 452, 109-118. doi: 10.3354/meps09588

Jack, L., & Wing, S. R. (2011). Individual variability in trophic position and diet of a marine omnivore is linked to kelp bed habitat. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 443, 129-139. doi: 10.3354/meps09468

Jack, L., Wing, S. R., Hu, Y., & Roberts, M. (2011). Natural trace elemental markers for adult red rock lobsters Jasus edwardsii vary among replicate distinct water masses. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 443, 141-151. doi: 10.3354/meps09510

Jack, L., & Wing, S. R. (2010). Maintenance of old-growth size structure and fecundity of the red rock lobster Jasus edwardsii among marine protected areas in Fiordland, New Zealand. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 404, 161-172. doi: 10.3354/meps08499

Jack, L., Wing, S. R., & McLeod, R. J. (2009). Prey base shifts in red rock lobster Jasus edwardsii in response to habitat conversion in Fiordland marine reserves: Implications for effective spatial management. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 381, 213-222. doi: 10.3354/meps07971

Hansson, B., Jack, L., Christians, J. K., Pemberton, J. M., Akesson, M., Westerdahl, H., … Hasselquist, D. (2007). No evidence for inbreeding avoidance in a great reed warbler population. Behavioral Ecology, 18, 157-164. doi: 10.1093/beheco/arl062

^ Top of page

Conference Contribution - Published proceedings: Abstract

Guerra, M., Rayment, W., Wing, L., Slooten, L., & Dawson, S. (2016). Trophic interactions in the Kaikōura submarine canyon: From primary productivity to sperm whales. Proceedings of the New Zealand Marine Sciences Society (NZMSS) and Australian Marine Sciences Association (AMSA) Conference: Sharing Ocean Resources: Now and in the Future. (pp. 41). Retrieved from https://innovators.eventsair.com/QuickEventWebsitePortal/nzmss-amsa-2016/home/Agenda

Wells, S., Wing, L., Smith, A., & Smith, I. (2016). Changes to Austrovenus stutchburyi growth rate since early human settlement in Otago, New Zealand: An indication of the extent of human impact on estuarine health. Proceedings of the New Zealand Marine Sciences Society (NZMSS) and Australian Marine Sciences Association (AMSA) Conference: Sharing Ocean Resources: Now and in the Future. (pp. 100). Retrieved from https://innovators.eventsair.com/QuickEventWebsitePortal/nzmss-amsa-2016/home/Agenda

Shatova, O., Wing, S., Hoffmann, L., Jack, L., & Gault-Ringold, M. (2015). Seabird guano enhances phytoplankton production in the Southern Ocean. Geophysical Research Abstracts, 17, EGU2015-166. [Abstract]

Jack, L., & Wing, S. (2011). Kelp bed habitat drives individual variability in trophic position and resource use of a marine omnivore. Proceedings of the New Zealand Marine Sciences Society (NZMSS) Conference: Understanding, Managing, and Conserving our Marine Environment. (pp. 12). Retrieved from http://nzmss.org/assets/Conference/NZMSS2011AbstractsOralPresentations.pdf

^ Top of page

Conference Contribution - Poster Presentation (not in published proceedings)

Connolly, A., Wing, L., Wing, S., & Smith, I. (2016, November). Observing changes in fish dietary niche associated with an increasing human population. Poster session presented at the New Zealand Coastal Society (NZCS) 24th Annual Conference, Dunedin, New Zealand.

^ Top of page

Conference Contribution - Verbal presentation and other Conference outputs

Jack, L. (2009, January). Trace elements as natural tags for rock lobsters in Fiordland, New Zealand. Verbal presentation at the 8th International Temperate Reef Symposium, Adelaide, Australia.

^ Top of page

Commissioned Report for External Body

Wing, S. R., & Jack, L. (2010). Biological monitoring of the Fiordland (Te Moana o Atawhenua) Marine Area and Fiordland's Marine Reserves. Commissioned by Department of Conservation. Dunedin, New Zealand: Department of Marine Science, University of Otago. 72p.

Wing, S. R., & Jack, L. (2007). Biological monitoring of the Fiordland (Te Moana o Atawhenua) Marine Area and Fiordland's Marine Reserves: 2007 (2 of 2). Commissioned by Department of Conservation. Dunedin, New Zealand: Department of Marine Science, University of Otago. 187p.

Wing, S., Bowman, M. H., Vennell, R., & Jack, L. (2006). Biological monitoring of the Fiordland (Te Moana o Atawhenua) Marine Area and Fiordland's Marine Reserves: 2006 (1 of 2). Commissioned by Department of Conservation. Dunedin, New Zealand: Department of Marine Science, University of Otago. 78p.

^ Top of page

Awarded Doctoral Degree

Jack, L. C. (2009). The ecological role of the red rock lobster Jasus edwardsii in Fiordland (PhD). University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. 197p.

More publications...