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The National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies addresses the most enduring and intractable problems confronting humanity

Launch of new publication

Read more about Professor Kevin Clements edited volume, Identity, Trust and Reconciliation in East Asia: Dealing with Painful History to Create a Peaceful Present 

This volume includes chapters from 15 scholars from Asia and Europe, including Professor Clements and Dr Ria Shibata, both University of Otago based.

Professor Richard Falk, said

“Kevin Clements has expertly edited a fascinating series of commentaries on the intensifying tensions challenging East Asia and how these might be addressed for the mutual benefit of China, Japan and Korea. The whole, undertaking, deepened by workshop interactions, warns of the dangers posed if new nationalisms are not sensitive to the regional interplay of historical memories and cultural differences.”

Congratulations to Kevin on the completion and publication of this important volume.

Rethinking Pacifism for Revolution, Security and Politics video links

This conference was hosted by the National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies, and convened by Professor Richard Jackson.

View links to YouTube presentations from the conference here. 

Join our passionate faculty to study development, peace-building and conflict transformation

The Centre is the only one if its kind in New Zealand, and our master's degree is one of very few such programmes in Australasia.

Master of Peace and Conflict Studies 2018

Apply here for the Master of Peace and Conflict Studies 2018.  Next intake: July 2018

Further information about the course is available.

Students who take PEAC595 (Practicum and Research Report) may be eligible for financial assistance to undertake their practicum overseas.

Email: Dr Rachel Rafferty, Director of Masters Study

Find out more about the work of the Centre

Professor Kevin Clements introduces the National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies

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