Accessibility Skip to Global Navigation Skip to Local Navigation Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Site Map Menu

3D pedestrian crossings begun on Clyde Street

Friday, 10 February 2017 12:48pm

Foot-crossing-colour-sketch-image
A sketch of the 3D pedestrian crossing which is being painted at the intersection of Clyde Street and Union Street East.

Crossing the road in Dunedin’s tertiary quarter is set to become safer and more fun with the installation of two 3D crossings on Clyde Street.

The crossings – which are being painted by two artists – are part of safety improvements on Clyde Street, which is busy with pedestrians, cars and buses.

The crossing at the intersection of Clyde Street and Union Street East will show feet walking under zebra stripes. The second crossing is just north of the Leith River and its design will have a river theme. The designs will appear three-dimensional to approaching traffic, but will look like flat crossings to people crossing the road. Work began today, and is expected to take about a week.

"Our street art on walls has been a great success and we are starting to look at other surfaces for creative projects. Like the poems on steps project, 3D crossings make the city more interesting to walk around."

Chair of the Dunedin City Council’s Planning and Environment Committee Cr David Benson-Pope says, “This is a great way of addressing the safety concerns that have been expressed about the intersection, and at the same time adding some Dunedin style and fun. I’m sure the improvements will be popular with all.”

The Dunedin City Council’s Team Leader Urban Design Crystal Filep says the designs are one of many initiatives to celebrate Dunedin’s rising profile as one of the world’s great small cities.

“Our street art on walls has been a great success and we are starting to look at other surfaces for creative projects. Like the poems on steps project, 3D crossings make the city more interesting to walk around.”

Jenny McCracken, a Melbourne-based artist, is working with local artist Guy Howard-Smith to implement her designs. The University is supporting the venture by hosting her while she undertakes the work.

Ms Filep says the University’s contribution will ensure a world-renowned artist can be welcomed appropriately without the need to source additional funding for the project.

In addition to the crossings, other traffic calming measures such as speed humps and warning signs will be implemented to improve pedestrian safety.

If the Clyde Street crossings are a success, 3D crossings may be used at other sites.