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New location for University Anzac commemorations

Thursday, 13 April 2017 12:47pm

anzac-day-gun-image
The gun salute in last year's Anzac Day commemorations. Photo: Sharron Bennett.

The University of Otago will once again host an Anzac Day service on campus – this year in the newly developed area outside the Staff Club.

The service, now in its sixth year, is to be held at 1.30pm on Tuesday 25 April.

The Otago University Students’ Association (OUSA) is working with Te Roopu Māori and the University to deliver a bi-cultural service for students, staff and the public.
OUSA Events Coordinator Luke Matsopoulos says student piper Sam Darling will pipe a welcome as attendees arrive from 1.15pm. The welcome will be followed by a gun salute at 1.30pm.

"It is a chance for our campus community to come together and reflect, honouring those who lost their lives, whilst above all, valuing and cherishing peace."

The service will be led by OUSA Campaigns Officer Eden Iati, and will feature readings by Dunedin Mayor Dave Cull and University Vice-Chancellor Professor Harlene Hayne along with performances by Te Roopu Maori and the Southern Youth Choir. OUSA President Hugh Baird and Tumuaki Te Roopū Mr Eli Toeke will give the main address.

After the service, wreaths will be laid at the end of the memorial walk on the Leith Bridge, which bears a commemorative plaque.

If the weather is wet, the event will be held inside the Main Common Room.

“OUSA is proud to be able to offer students and university staff the opportunity to attend an on-campus commemorative service for ANZAC Day. It is a chance for our campus community to come together and reflect, honouring those who lost their lives, whilst above all, valuing and cherishing peace.”

The University Anzac services began in 2012. The afternoon timing gives those who could not attend other services a chance to commemorate Anzac Day.

Anzac Day was originally to honour the members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) who fought at Gallipoli against the Ottoman Empire during World War One.

Now Anzac Day is widely acknowledged as a national day of remembrance for all the Australians and New Zealanders who have served and died in wars, conflicts, and peacekeeping operations, along with the contribution, suffering and sacrifice of everyone who has served.