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Māori Strategic Framework 2022 launched

Tuesday, 29 August 2017 8:40pm

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Guests at the launch of the University's updated Māori Strategic Framework (back row from left) Hata Temo, Te Hau Moses, Frank Edwards and Rino Tirikatene and (front row, from left) Karin Fraser, Mariana Te Pou, Kirsten Porter, Porourangi Templeton and Jacob Ashdown. Photos: Sharron Bennett.

The recent launch of the University’s updated Māori Strategic Framework heralds a new stage of Māori advancement at Otago.

The Māori Strategic Framework (MSF) 2022 was formally launched at an event in the University’s Council chambers in late June.

The University’s Director of Māori Development Tuari Potiki says the inaugural MSF, launched 10 years ago in June 2007, was a landmark for the University.

"The original MSF was important in describing, organising and implementing positive change for Māori in the institution and now we are now building on that good work."

“It upheld the mana of the Treaty of Waitangi while making concrete the University’s commitment to Māori advancement through a set of carefully articulated goals and strategies,” Mr Potiki says.

However New Zealand’s social and economic landscape has changed significantly over the last decade, with recent consultation highlighting the need for the University to refresh the MSF and adjust its strategic emphases to address new areas of opportunity.

“The original MSF was important in describing, organising and implementing positive change for Māori in the institution and now we are now building on that good work.”

Mr Potiki says this latest MSF can be seen as a “roadmap” for development.

“By launching the MSF 2022 we show that it is a living document and are able to highlight that this is a University of Otago strategic document and as such is everyone’s responsibility,” Mr Potiki says.

"By launching the MSF 2022 we show that it is a living document and are able to highlight that this is a University of Otago strategic document and as such is everyone’s responsibility."

“It not only outlines responsibilities but also authority for Māori Development. As an example, Te Reo Māori is an official language of Aotearoa/New Zealand. The MSF outlines the authority for its use and encourages, through strategy and policy, continued and extended use.

“The MSF supports the development of strong Māori focused research projects, teams and opportunities with an emphasis on outcomes that provide a positive effect for Māori, especially in the area of health but also in social justice, income inequality and education.”

The MSF 2022 clearly defines the six key areas for Māori development at the University of Otago over the next five years.

A major feature is the action plan which fits in a pocket at the back of the MSF. The action plan adds detail to the implementation of the goals and how to achieve them. The action plan can be revised after two or three years and can be slotted back into the MSF.

The MSF is available to all staff.

Mr Potiki says many people were involved in its development.

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The Maori Strategic Framework 2022 is printed in a stunning booklet.

The six goals of the University of Otago’s Māori Strategic Framework 2022:

Goal One:
Te Arahina me Te Honohono: Leadership and Partnership
To demonstrate strong, accountable leadership which contributes to whānau, hāpu and iwi development.

Goal Two:
Te Rangahau Māori: Māori Research
To undertake research that is transformative and beneficial for Māori communities, including research that increases understanding of te ao Māori and mātauranga Māori, and supports the University’s commitment to excellence in research.

Goal Three:
Ngā Whakahaerenga Pai: Quality Programmes and Teaching
To create and enhance exemplary learning and teaching environments which allow staff and students to engage capably with te ao Māori and mātauranga Māori through the provision of outstanding and innovative degree and support programmes, and excellence in teaching.

Goal Four:
Ngā Taonga Tuku Iho: Te Reo and Tikanga Māori
To increase the use of te reo and tikanga Māori (Māori language and cultural practices) across each level of the University.

Goal Five:
Te Taumata Angitu Māori: Māori Student Success
To increase Māori student success at Otago by providing an environment in which Māori students are supported to thrive and succeed as Māori.

Goal Six:
Te Whakapakaritanga o ngā Kaimahi Māori: Māori Staff Growth and Development
To increase the number of Māori staff at the University of Otago and support their professional and cultural development.

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Celebrating the launch of the MSF (from left) Tuari Potiki, Vice-Chancellor Professor Harlene Hayne, Rino Tirikatene and Paul Karaitiana.