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HUBS192 Human Body Systems 2

An introduction to the structure and function of the human cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal/urinary and reproductive systems including organ development.

How does your heart pump and your gut absorb nutrients and how do your kidneys control water balance when you are sleeping, running a marathon at the equator or climbing Mt Everest. This paper will introduce you to the structure (Anatomy) and function (Physiology) of your body systems and begin to explain why the body operates as such an efficient machine under a range of normal conditions.

HUBS 192 will build on the principle of homeostasis developed in HUBS 191 with consideration of the five main body systems: cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal/urinary and reproductive systems.

Paper title Human Body Systems 2
Paper code HUBS192
Subject Human Body Systems
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Second Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $1,018.05
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $4,500.00

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Prerequisite
HUBS 191
Restriction
ANAT 120, PHSE 192
Schedule C
Science
Contact
Course Administrator: Mr Philip Kelly Professional Practice Fellow
Textbooks
To be confirmed
Teaching staff
Academic Course Convenor: Dr Steven Condliffe
Anatomy Modules Convenor: Dr Ruth Napper
Physiology Modules Convenor: Dr Steven Condliffe
Lecturers include: Assoc Prof Greg Jones, Dr Jeff Erickson, Ms Rachel Lissaman, Dr Matt Bevin, Dr Daryl Schwenke, Dr Ruth Napper, Dr Steven Condliffe, Dr Rebecca Bird, Dr Fiona McDonald, and Dr Megan Wilson

Teaching Fellows from the Department of Anatomy and Department of Physiology will teach the laboratory classes, assisted by a large team of demonstrators.

Note: Teaching staff will be updated for 2017. Follow the 'more information' link above for details.
Paper Structure
The paper includes 51 lectures, some of which are committed to the revision and integration of material previously presented.

Laboratory classes run on a 2-week cycle, with each student attending one 3-hour session. These classes reinforce lecture material, integrate physiological and anatomical concepts and provide the students with a range of skills, such as recording physiological data and dissection skills. Laboratory classes include an exit test, designed to ensure students have gained the knowledge expected of them during the session.

Three guided learning modules (GLMs) are used to reinforce and extend the knowledge gained in lectures, which the students will work on in their own time.

The paper will cover the essential anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, urinary and reproductive systems.

Assessment
Internal assessment (28%) consists of:
  • Two terms tests composed of multiple choice questions. Each test is worth 7% of the final mark
  • Completion of each lab, worth 1% each, will contribute a maximum of 6% towards the final mark
  • Completion of 3 GLMs will gain a total of 8% (3%, 3% and 2%) towards the final mark
Students must gain an average of 40% in these tests to gain 'terms'.

The final examination comprises 72% of the final mark, and students must gain 40% in the final exam, regardless of their internal mark, to pass the paper.

The final exam is composed of multiple choice questions and short answer questions.
Teaching Arrangements
You will attend 4 lectures each week. Lectures are also video streamed to allow a large number of students to take part in this paper, and we ensure that the lecturer will be in your lecture at least every fourth lecture. Video-casts of these lectures are placed on Blackboard at 5pm the day of the lecture for student revision. Material to be covered in the lecture is available on the day prior to the lecture to encourage some pre-lecture familiarity and enhance learning in the lecture.

You will attend a 1-hour laboratory class in week one of the second semester and a 3-hour laboratory session on alternate weeks. These sessions are very interactive, with students working in groups in which discussion and problem solving is encouraged.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Interdisciplinary perspective, Lifelong learning, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Ethics, Information literacy, self motivation and team work.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
  • To gain a broad understanding and knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the human body, including fundamental facts and concepts that will form a basis for study in a wide range of Health Science disciplines (eg Anatomy, Physiology, Professional Health Science qualifications and Physical Education)
  • To become an active learner by taking part in laboratory class discussions and GLMs
  • To develop a sense of the interconnectedness of knowledge about the body and the interdisciplinary nature of all biomedical knowledge
  • To develop an awareness of the scientific basis of knowledge and current research undertaken in the disciplines you study
  • To develop independence of learning that equips the student with life-long learning skills

^ Top of page

Timetable

Second Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
L1 Monday 09:00-09:50 28-34, 36-41
Tuesday 09:00-09:50 28-34, 36-41
Thursday 09:00-09:50 28-34, 36-41
Friday 09:00-09:50 28-34, 36-41
L2 Monday 09:00-09:50 28-34, 36-41
Tuesday 09:00-09:50 28-34, 36-41
Thursday 09:00-09:50 28-34, 36-41
Friday 09:00-09:50 28-34, 36-41
L3 Monday 17:00-17:50 28-34, 36-41
Tuesday 17:00-17:50 28-34, 36-41
Thursday 17:00-17:50 28-34, 36-41
Friday 17:00-17:50 28-34, 36-41
L4 Monday 17:00-17:50 28-34, 36-41
Tuesday 17:00-17:50 28-34, 36-41
Thursday 17:00-17:50 28-34, 36-41
Friday 17:00-17:50 28-34, 36-41

Practical

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
P1 Monday 09:00-11:50 30, 32, 34, 37, 39, 41
P2 Monday 14:00-16:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40
P3 Monday 14:00-16:50 30, 32, 34, 37, 39, 41
P4 Tuesday 09:00-11:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40
P5 Tuesday 09:00-11:50 30, 32, 34, 37, 39, 41
P6 Tuesday 14:00-16:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40
P7 Wednesday 09:00-11:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40
P8 Wednesday 09:00-11:50 30, 32, 34, 37, 39, 41
P9 Wednesday 14:00-16:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40
P10 Wednesday 14:00-16:50 30, 32, 34, 37, 39, 41
P11 Wednesday 18:00-20:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40
P12 Wednesday 18:00-20:50 30, 32, 34, 37, 39, 41
P13 Thursday 09:00-11:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40
P14 Thursday 09:00-11:50 30, 32, 34, 37, 39, 41
P15 Thursday 14:00-16:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40

An introduction to the structure and function of the human cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal/urinary and reproductive systems including organ development.

How does your heart pump and your gut absorb nutrients and how do your kidneys control water balance when you are sleeping, running a marathon at the equator or climbing Mt Everest. This paper will introduce you to the structure (Anatomy) and function (Physiology) of your body systems and begin to explain why the body operates as such an efficient machine under a range of normal conditions.

HUBS 192 will build on the principle of homeostasis developed in HUBS 191 with consideration of the five main body systems: cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal/urinary and reproductive systems.

Paper title Human Body Systems 2
Paper code HUBS192
Subject Human Body Systems
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Second Semester
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2018 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
HUBS 191
Restriction
ANAT 120, PHSE 192
Schedule C
Science
Contact
Course Administrator: Mr Philip Kelly Professional Practice Fellow
Teaching staff
Academic Course Convenor: to be confirmed Anatomy Modules Convenor: Dr Ruth Napper
Physiology Modules Convenor: Dr Steven Condliffe
Lecturers include: Assoc Prof Greg Jones, Dr Jeff Erickson, Ms Rachel Lissaman, Dr Matt Bevin, Dr Daryl Schwenke, Dr Ruth Napper, Dr Steven Condliffe, Dr Rebecca Bird, and Dr Megan Wilson

Teaching Fello
Teaching Arrangements
You will attend four lectures each week. Lectures are also video streamed to allow a large number of students to take part in this paper, and we ensure that the lecturer will be in your lecture at least every fourth lecture. Video-casts of these lectures are placed on Blackboard at 5pm the day of the lecture for student revision. Material to be covered in the lecture is available on the day prior to the lecture to encourage some pre-lecture familiarity and enhance learning in the lecture.

You will attend a 1-hour laboratory class in week one of the second semester and a 3-hour laboratory session on alternate weeks. These sessions are very interactive, with students working in groups in which discussion and problem solving is encouraged.
Textbooks
Anatomy and Physiology, Patton and Thibodeau, 8th edn., (Elsevier, 2013)
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Interdisciplinary perspective, Lifelong learning, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Ethics, Information literacy, Self-motivation, Teamwork
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes
Paper Structure
Human Body Systems II - HUBS 192

Course Structure

This paper continues the homeostatic theme developed in HUBS 191 and specifically studies the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal and reproductive systems. Blood and acid-base balance are also addressed.

The prescribed text is Anatomy and Physiology, Patton and Thibodeau, 8th edn., (Elsevier, 2013). Self-directed learning is an important aspect of this paper, and students are expected to prepare for lectures by reading specified sections from the text.

Teaching Hours: There are a total of 69 hours of formal teaching split between lectures (51 hours) and laboratories (18 hours).

Lectures: There are four 1-hour lectures each week, and the paper runs for the entire semester. Four 'revision and integration' lectures are held during the semester. Lectures are delivered by staff members from the departments of Anatomy and Physiology. Lectures are interlinked and videorecordings and livestreaming are available to students via Blackboard.

Laboratories: One 3-hour laboratory each fortnight (total of six lab sessions). All laboratories are compulsory and are terms requirements.

Guided Learning Modules (GLMs): Students are provided online GLM documents to work through in their own time before completing an online test via Blackboard. There are three GLMs in HUBS 192.

Terms Tests: There are two terms tests during the semester. Each consists of 25 multiple-choice questions to be completed within 30 minutes. Attendance at both tests is compulsory to meet terms requirements.

Assessment:
  • Laboratories - 6% (1% each)
  • GLMs - 8% (3%, 3% and 2%)
  • Terms Test 1 - 7%
  • Terms Test 2 - 7%
  • Final Exam - 72%
The final examination is three hours in duration and consists of multiple-choice and short- and long-answer written questions. Students must get a minimum of 40% in the final exam in order to pass the paper.

HUBS 192 Curriculum - Lectures

Cardiovascular System
  • Design of the Circulation and Hemodynamics
  • Anatomy of the Heart (Part 1)
  • Anatomy of the Heart (Part 2)
  • Circulatory system anatomy (Arteries and Veins)
  • Circulatory system anatomy (Capillaries and Lymphatics)
  • The Heart as a Pump
  • The Excitable Heart
  • Controlling the Heart and Blood Pressure
  • Controlling 'Regional' Blood Flows
  • Venous Blood Flow and the Heart
Respiratory System
  • Upper respiratory tract
  • Lower respiratory tract
  • Structures of Thorax and Ventilation
  • Overview of respiratory physiology
  • Work of Breathing/Lung Volumes
  • O2 and CO2 exchange
  • O2 and CO2 transport
  • Control of breathing
  • Cardiovascular and Respiratory Revision and Integration
Blood
  • Composition and general functions of blood; production of blood cells, anaemia
  • Blood-clotting and blood groups
Gastrointestinal System
  • Introduction to GI Anatomy and Physiology
  • The basic structure of the GI system
  • The stomach and pancreas
  • The structure of the small intestine
  • The structure of the large intestine, and comments on the liver
  • Motility of the GI tract
  • Secretion
  • Chemical digestion
  • Absorption
  • GI revision and integration
Renal/Urinary System
  • Overview of the urinary system
  • The Nephron
  • Ureters, Bladder, and Urethra
  • Controlling and coordinating the urinary system
  • Glomerular function
  • Tubular function
  • Body water - distribution and regulation
  • Renal regulation of extracellular fluid composition and volume
Acid-base Balance
  • Definition/importance of Acid-Base balance, concept of pH
  • Respiratory and renal mechanisms of pH control
  • Renal/urinary/acid-base balance Revision and Integration
Reproductive System and Developmental Biology
  • Male reproductive system I
  • Male reproductive system II and spermatogenesis
  • Female reproductive system I
  • Female reproductive system II and menstrual cycle
  • Coitus - neurologic and vascular components
  • Development I fertilisation to implantation
  • Development II - formation of primary germ layers
  • Development III - formation of the reproductive tracts
  • Reproduction System and Development Revision and Integration
HUBS 192 Curriculum - Laboratories:
  • Cardiovascular System I: Anatomy of the human heart and vasculature illustrated by dissection of a deer heart. Physiology of the human heart, including electrical activity during cardiac cycle and its relationship with mechanical activity.*
  • Cardiovascular System II: Physiology of the cardiovascular system: Heart rate, arterial blood pressure, the effect of posture on heart rate and blood pressure.
  • Respiratory: Anatomy of the upper and the lower respiratory tract. Lung function and volumes.*
  • Gastrointestinal: Anatomical components of the digestive system. Physiology of the gastrointestinal system: motility and secretions of the gastrointestinal tract, digestion and absorption of food.*
  • Renal/Urinary: Gross and microscopic anatomical components of the urinary system. Volumes of fluids handled by the kidneys, maintenance of plasma volume and osmolarity and changes in urine composition.*
  • Reproduction: Anatomical components of the male and female reproductive systems and human prenatal development.*
*Please note, during these labs human cadaveric material will be on display and/or used as demonstration material.
Learning Outcomes
  • To gain a broad understanding and knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the human body, including fundamental facts and concepts that will form a basis for study in a wide range of Health Science disciplines (e.g. Anatomy, Physiology, Professional Health Science qualifications and Physical Education)
  • To become an active learner by taking part in laboratory class discussions and GLMs
  • To develop a sense of the interconnectedness of knowledge about the body and the interdisciplinary nature of all biomedical knowledge
  • To develop an awareness of the scientific basis of knowledge and current research undertaken in the disciplines you study
  • To develop independence of learning that equips the student with life-long learning skills

^ Top of page

Timetable

Second Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
L1 Monday 09:00-09:50 28-34, 36-41
Tuesday 09:00-09:50 28-34, 36-41
Thursday 09:00-09:50 28-34, 36-41
Friday 09:00-09:50 28-34, 36-41
L2 Monday 09:00-09:50 28-34, 36-41
Tuesday 09:00-09:50 28-34, 36-41
Thursday 09:00-09:50 28-34, 36-41
Friday 09:00-09:50 28-34, 36-41
L3 Monday 17:00-17:50 28-34, 36-41
Tuesday 17:00-17:50 28-34, 36-41
Thursday 17:00-17:50 28-34, 36-41
Friday 17:00-17:50 28-34, 36-41
L4 Monday 17:00-17:50 28-34, 36-41
Tuesday 17:00-17:50 28-34, 36-41
Thursday 17:00-17:50 28-34, 36-41
Friday 17:00-17:50 28-34, 36-41

Practical

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
P1 Monday 09:00-11:50 30, 32, 34, 37, 39, 41
P2 Monday 14:00-16:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40
P3 Monday 14:00-16:50 30, 32, 34, 37, 39, 41
P4 Tuesday 09:00-11:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40
P5 Tuesday 09:00-11:50 30, 32, 34, 37, 39, 41
P6 Tuesday 14:00-16:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40
P7 Wednesday 09:00-11:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40
P8 Wednesday 09:00-11:50 30, 32, 34, 37, 39, 41
P9 Wednesday 14:00-16:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40
P10 Wednesday 14:00-16:50 30, 32, 34, 37, 39, 41
P11 Wednesday 18:00-20:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40
P12 Wednesday 18:00-20:50 30, 32, 34, 37, 39, 41
P13 Thursday 09:00-11:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40
P14 Thursday 09:00-11:50 30, 32, 34, 37, 39, 41
P15 Thursday 14:00-16:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40