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Books by Fraser, Lyndon

Shifting Centres: Women and Migration in New Zealand History

ISBN: 1 877276 32 4

New Zealand is an immigrant society, but little has been written about the diverse migrant experiences of women to and within New Zealand. Shifting Centres: Women and Migration in New Zealand History, edited by Lyndon Fraser and Katie Pickles, links the lives of very different women through their experiences of migration. This is a multicultural study. It includes migration from north to south, from country to country and from rural areas to town. Much of the material is from the twentieth century. Subjects range from Maori urban migration, to refugees from Nazism, and recent Chinese migration. Some of the essays are life stories.

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Rushing for Gold: Life and commerce on the goldfields of New Zealand and Australia

ISBN: 978 1 877578 54 0

'Rushing for Gold' is the first book to take a trans-Tasman look at the nineteenth-century phenomenon that was the gold rushes in Australia and New Zealand. It explores links between the rushes, particularly those in Victoria and Otago, to show that they were strongly intertwined affairs. The book brings together contributions from both experienced and newly emergent researchers, who together provide a close examination of miners’ migration patterns, ethnicities and merchant networks. The contributors’ insightful analyses and narrative accounts of the places, commerce and heritage of the rushes reveal a pantheon of characters, from merchants, hoteliers, financiers and policemen to vagrants, sly-groggers and entertainers, not to mention women, all of whom prompted and populate the mythology of the era, which this book does much to unravel and rewrite.

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Castles of Gold: A History of New Zealand’s West Coast Irish

ISBN: 978 1 877372 44 5

From the 1860s, the West Coast of New Zealand’s South Island was the scene of two major goldfields, attracting hopefuls from all over the world. Suddenly, where there had been native bush and wide rivers, towns with 400 pubs and accommodation houses had appeared. Amongst the hopefuls were Irish miners, many of whom stayed on after the goldrushes as part of a community with its own distinctive character. This is the first study on the history of those Irish ...