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Books by McCarthy, Angela

Migration, Ethnicity, and Madness: New Zealand, 1860–1910

ISBN: 978 1 927322 00 0

Migration, Ethnicity, and Madness: New Zealand, 1860–1910 provides a social, cultural, and political history of migration, ethnicity, and madness in New Zealand between 1860 and 1910. Its key aim is to analyse the ways that patients, families, asylum officials, and immigration authorities engaged with the ethnic backgrounds and migration histories and pathways of asylum patients and why. Exploring such issues enables us to appreciate the difficulties that some migrants experienced in their relocation abroad, hardships that are often elided in studies of migration that focus on successful migrant settlement. Drawing upon lunatic asylum records (including patient casebooks and committal forms), immigration files, Surgeon Superintendents’ reports, Asylum Inspectors’ reports, medical journals and legislation, the book highlights the importance of examining antecedent experiences, the migration process itself, and settlement in the new land as factors that contributed to admission to an asylum. The study also raises broader themes beyond the asylum of discrimination, exclusion, segregation, and marginalisation, issues that are as evident in society today as in the past.

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Far from 'Home': The English in New Zealand

ISBN: 978 1 877578 32 8

For almost 200 years, the English have been one of the largest migrant streams to New Zealand (they have been on the move globally since around 1600). Yet relatively little has been written about their experiences in New Zealand, compared with their Irish, Scottish, Indian, Chinese and Pacific counterparts. This book brings together leading international scholars and prominent local researchers to explore a wide range of topics and issues at the very heart of research into human mobility. Why did English-born people decide to emigrate? What factors shaped their migration and adaptation? How might we best describe and explain their experiences? This collection of essays will interest anyone interested in migration and/or family history.