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Education

A B C D E H I J K L M O P S T W

A

A Fine Pen
Shifen Gong selects and introduces twenty texts about Mansfield and her work, translated into English for the first time.

A Foucault Primer
'A consistently clear, comprehensive and accessible introduction which carefully sifts Foucault's work for both its strengths and weaknesses. McHoul and Grace show an intimate familiarity with Foucault's writings and a lively, but critical engagement with the relevance of his work. A model primer.' – Tony Bennett, author of Outside Literature

A Name and Word Index to Nga Mahi a Nga Tupuna
A Name and Word Index to Nga Mahi a Nga Tupuna

A Religious Atheist?
During his lifetime, internationally celebrated New Zealand thinker and author Lloyd Geering has published numerous thought-provoking books on the nature of religious belief – and has also been tried for heresy (in 1967). This book critiques Geering's now well-known religious atheism in terms of its philosophical underpinnings.

Advocating for Children
Advocating for Children: International perspectives on children's rights

An Advanced Chinese Reader
A one-year reading course in Chinese language, based on twenty-two texts and associated exercises, for advanced-level learners.

Ara Mai he Tētēkura
Visioning our Futures

With less than 2 per cent of the total Māori population holding a doctorate, the need for Māori leadership planning in academia has never been greater. The purpose of this book is to present the experiences of new and emerging Māori academics as a guide for others aspiring to follow.

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B

Being a Doctor
Sometimes caring for patients can leave clinicians feeling overwhelmed with the daily tasks of doctoring. As an antidote, this book explores principles and assumptions of modern medicine seldom taught in medical school. Starting with the meaning of suffering and how the ‘science’ of medicine has evolved, the authors use many clinical stories to provide a fresh perspective on the work and roles of the modern doctor.

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C

Childhoods
Some of the worst levels of child poverty and poor health in the OECD, as well as exceptionally high child suicide rates, exist in Aotearoa New Zealand today. More than a quarter of children are experiencing a childhood of hardship and deprivation in a context of high levels of inequality. Māori children face particular challenges. In a country that characterises itself as ‘a good place to bring up children’, this is of major concern. The essays in this book are by leading researchers from several disciplines and focus on all of our children and young people, exploring such topics as the environment (economic, social and natural), social justice, children’s voices and rights, the identity issues they experience and the impact of rapid societal change.

Children of Rogernomics
From 2003 to 2007 Nairn, Higgins and Sligo investigated what life was like for ninety-three young people coming to adulthood in the wake of Rogernomics. The authors bring the lives, places and hopes of these young people into sharp focus. Their stories reveal the powerful psychic and material impacts of the discourses of neoliberalism, which obscure the structural basis of inequalities and insist that failure to achieve standard transitions is the result of personal inadequacy.

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D

Disobedient Teaching: Surviving and creating change in education

This book is about disobedience. Positive disobedience. Disobedience as a kind of professional behaviour. It shows how teachers can survive and even influence an education system that does staggering damage to potential. More importantly it is an arm around the shoulder of disobedient teachers who transform people’s lives, not by climbing promotion ladders but by operating at the grassroots.

Dolphins Down Under
New Zealand dolphins, also known as Hector’s dolphins, are fascinating and beautiful animals. Found only in New Zealand waters, their numbers are now under constant threat – especially from human fishing activities. This book introduces the dolphin to readers of all ages. The authors have devoted the last 30 years – more than a dolphin lifespan – to intensive study of the dolphin’s distribution, behaviour, biology, reproduction and communication, using photography as their principal research tool. They have identified over 100 individuals and recorded their life events.

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E

e-Learning Communities
In western societies, the growth in use of information and communication technology (ICT) in schools and classrooms - particularly in Internet connectivity - has been rapid. A recent study showed that 82 per cent of primary schools in New Zealand in 2002 and 78 per cent of secondary schools in 2001 had Internet connections. The Web is clearly a vital tool for both teachers and students. This book is for people working in education and explores the dynamics of ICT use and the issues surrounding its implementation.

e-Learning
This book is for teachers working with the Internet in education. It is useful for professional development and for curriculum and IT planning. Based on very recent research, it provides teachers with answers to many of the questions that arise from using the computer as an educational tool.

Employment Relations
This comprehensive book describes current practice in industrial relations, using case studies from Australia, the US, the UK and New Zealand. It provides some historical background and introduces key concepts in the field. Discussion includes what is an employee / employer, what are unions and their roles, industrial relations objectives, and the dynamics of interactions such as bargaining. The book examines also addresses issues such as wages, work flexibility, participation and equal employment opportunities.

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H

How to Do Local History
Local historians, church and institutional historians, genealogists, thesis-writers, and the people who commission them will welcome How To Do Local History. It is a brief and lively introduction to historical research, writing and publishing by a leading historian. This book explains how to use books and archives, and is full of practical tips on 'reading' the landscape, on oral history and on using illustrations effectively. The last chapter takes historians and their clients through the intricacies of internet and conventional publishing, using case studies of real books to explain terminology, scheduling, design, costing and selling.

How to Study Literature in English
This text has been written for the student advancing into the study of literature at university, and is designed to give basic information on the concepts and methods of literary criticism. While pitched at Stage 1 students, it should prove equally useful for senior high school students, as well as for those who are pursuing a degree in English literature at higher undergraduate stages. Specifically, it bridges the gap between coursebooks relating to the Year 12 and 13 syllabus and the more specialised texts prescribed in university courses. For this reason, high school teachers will also find it an invaluable resource.

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I

'I am five and I go to school'
The twentieth century was a time of great change in early years education. As the century opened, the use of Froebel's kindergarten methods infiltrated more infant classrooms. The emergence of psychology as a discipline, and especially its work on child development, was beginning to influence thinking about how infants learn through play. While there were many teachers who maintained Victorian approaches in their classrooms, some others experimented, were widely read and a few even travelled to the US and Europe and brought new ideas home. As well, there was increasing political support for new approaches to the 'new education' ideas at the turn of the century. All was not plain sailing, however, and this book charts both the progress made and the obstacles overcome in the course of the century, as the nation battled its way through world wars and depressions.

I whanau au ki Kaiapoi
Natanahira Waruwarutu was a child at the time of the capture of Kaiapoi Pa by Te Rauparaha's Ngati Toa warriors in 1832. The early years of his life, recounted here in the original Maori text and an accompanying translation, saw great change in the Maori communities of Waitaha (Canterbury) and Akaora. Otako leaders set aside Moeraki, further south, for Kaiapoi refugees and Waruwarutu moved between the two places until he died in 1895. Before his death, he passed on to scribe Thomas Green, himself a Ngai Tahu elder, a substantial body of material that now defines modern understanding of the traditional history of Ngai Tahu. This manuscript was part of that material and, as Te Maire Tau describes in his introduction, has a history of its own.

India In New Zealand
Indian people in 'bi-cultural' New Zealand have long been an invisible minority, rarely mentioned in our history books. This volume is a second contribution to remedying this historical silence, following the publication of Indian Settlers: The Story of a New Zealand South Asian Community by Jacqueline Leckie. The first section introduces the context, briefly tracing the history of Empire and migration, which saw a few hundred adventurers from Gujarat and Punjab braving the seas and settling here in the late 19th century. Now Indians constitute the second-largest Asian-Kiwi group in our population (having more than doubled in number between 1991 and 2001).

Indigenous Identity and Resistance
Indigenous Identity and Resistance brings together the work of Indigenous Studies scholars working in Canada, New Zealand and the Pacific in research conversations that transcend the imperial boundaries of the colonial nations in which they are located. Their lucid, accessible, and thought-provoking essays provide a critical understanding of the ways in which Indigenous peoples are rearticulating their histories, knowledges, and the Indigenous self.

Introduction to Ophthalmology
'A medical student or non-ophthalmologist seeking a brief but coherent discussion of ophthalmology can do no better than Parr's Introduction to Ophthalmology. American-written texts are pre-eminent in their accounts of current therapies and technologies. In an introductory textbook, organization and clarity of expression - characteristics of some English authors - may be more important. A New Zealander, Parr combines American currency and English clarity.' The New England Journal of Medicine

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J

Janet Frame
New Zealand writer Janet Frame became world-famous through An Angel at My Table, the film based on her autobiographical trilogy. Here, Gina Mercer presents a dynamic discussion of all of Frame's works, beginning with her controversial debut in 1951 with The Lagoon & Other Stories.

John Larkins Cheese Richardson
The definitive biography of a much-beloved and respected colonial activist. Born in Bengal in 1810 but educated in England, Richardson spent his early career in India in the military, achieving the rank of major. He served in the Afghanistan campaign in 1842 and was ADC to Sir Harry Smith throughout the Sikh Wars. On his retirement from the army in the 1850s he spent four months in New Zealand and subsequently decided to migrate permanently, settling in Otago in 1856.

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K

Ka Taoka Hakena
In 1907 Dr T.M. Hocken of Dunedin – historian, bibliographer and collector – undertook to gift to the University of Otago his magnificent collection of books, manuscripts, paintings and other historical documents relating to New Zealand and the Pacific.

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L

Living Space
This book was one of the first to explore the concept of sustainability and its application to New Zealand settlements. Upon their arrival in New Zealand from the UK, the editors of this volume noted that the concept of sustainability and its application to the built environment had been relatively underdeveloped in New Zealand's academic environment. By bringing together eleven theoretic and pragmatic contributions from those who have been working on the issue, they hope to jump-start the debate in the island country.

Living Together
In this book experts in community planning review some of the challenges, strategies and solutions, using New Zealand case studies. The needs of specific groups - whether migrant, the young, elderly or indigenous - and community ties with local and central government are explored. The Treaty of Waitangi, the influence of feminism and the development of online communities are other aspects that are considered.

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M

Malaysian Stopover
Developed in collaboration with Malaysian educators, the material offers a window on life in their country, with a child focus, as well as accurate and up-to-date information. Malaysian Stopover offers a range of learning activities – music-making, artwork, dance, language, writing.

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O

Oceanian Journeys and Sojourns
Oceanian Journeys and Sojourns focuses on how Pacific Island peoples – Oceanians – think about a range of journeys near and far: their meanings, motives and implications. In addition to addressing human mobility in various island locales, these essays deal with the interconnections of culture, identity and academic research among indigenous Pacific peoples that have emerged from the contributors’ personal observations and fieldwork encounters. Firmly grounded in the human experience, this edited work offers insights into the development of new knowledge in and of the Pacific. More than half the authors are themselves Oceanians and five of twelve essays are by island women.

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P

Pacific Identities and Well-being
This anthology addresses the mental health and therapeutic needs of Polynesian and Melanesian people and the scarcity of resources for those working with them. It is divided into four parts – Identity, Therapeutic Practice, Death and Dying, Reflexive Practice – that approach the concerns of Maori, Samoans, Tongans, Fijians and people from Tuvalu and Tokelau. Contributors include a wide range of writers, most of who are Maori or Pasifika. Poems by Serie Barford, Selina Tusitala Marsh and Tracey Tawhiao introduce each section. As Pasifika populations expand, so do the issues generated by colonisation, intermarriage, assimilation, socioeconomic insecurity and international migration. The stresses of adolescence, identity, families, death and spirituality are all explored here in innovative research that offers a wealth of inspiration and ideas to supportive family, friends and practitioners.

Politics in the Playground
Politics in the Playground is a lively account of early childhood education and care in postwar New Zealand, following on from the author’s study Discovery of Early Childhood (1997), which traced the origins of institutional care for young children in Europe and New Zealand.

Promoting Health
in Aotearoa New Zealand

The health of the planet – and all of us who live on it – is under dire threat from factors such as climate change, obesity and new infectious diseases. Progressive health promotion is an approach that can counterbalance these threats with practice, policy and advocacy for health, well-being and equity. 'Promoting Health in Aotearoa New Zealand' provides a rich scan of the health promotion landscape in New Zealand. It explores ways in which Māori, and other, perspectives have been melded with Western ideas to produce distinctly New Zealand approaches. In doing so it addresses the need for locally written material for use in teaching and practice, and provides direction for all those wanting to solve complex public health problems.

Pushing Boundaries
We know a lot about the early missionaries who came to New Zealand from 1814 and how Christianity developed through their complex interactions with Māori. Less well known
are the ways in which settler churches of Aotearoa New Zealand reached out to engage in missionary activity in other parts of the world. 'Pushing Boundaries' is the first book-length attempt to tell the story of the evolution of overseas missionary activity by New Zealand’s Protestant churches from the early nineteenth century up to World War II. In this thought-provoking book, Hugh Morrison outlines how and why missions became important to colonial churches – the theological and social reasons churches supported missions, how their ideas were shaped, and what motivated individual New Zealanders to leave these shores to devote their lives elsewhere. Secondly, he connects this local story to some larger historical themes – of gender, culture, empire, childhood and education. This book argues that understanding the overseas missionary activity of Protestant churches and groups can contribute to a more general understanding of how New Zealand has developed as a society and nation.

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S

Sexual Cultures in Aotearoa New Zealand Education
Aotearoa New Zealand was recently rated by the Lonely Planet travel guide as the second most ‘gay friendly’ country in the world, with some of the most advanced human rights legislation. Research suggests, however, that New Zealand’s relatively ‘inclusive’ social climate is not always reflected in our educational settings. This book explores how the assumption that heterosexuality is the norm operates in education, and the discriminatory effects of this for teachers, for students, and for parents, in early childhood education, schools, tertiary and alternative settings. How can education settings become more socially just sites of inclusion for sexual and gender diversity? Contributors from a wide range of sectors discuss their research and invite others to join them in resisting the many injustices perpetuated by the unchecked discriminatory discourses that have shaped New Zealand education historically, and which continue to do so today.

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The Law of Research
Responding to a growing need for legal advice for researchers, this book provides a guide to the law of research. It will be useful to anyone working in New Zealand's research community, whether in public sector research organisations, administering research enterprises or working with human research subjects.

Touchy Subject
An interesting and disturbing cultural shift is at work in the relationship between children and their teachers. 'Teachers touching children' has become the site of a new social taboo, one about which there is much confusion and anxiety amongst teachers, as well as parents and children. The authors of this book are from several countries, including the UK, US, Samoa, Australia and New Zealand. They share a research interest in the effects of the anxieties about child abuse now commonplace in Western countries.

Treaty-Based Guidelines and Protocols for Tertiary Education Institutions
What are the implications of tertiary education providers committing to the Treaty of Waitangi? Treaty-Based Guidelines and Protocols for Tertiary Education Institutions seeks to clarify what exactly a Treaty relationship means for tertiary institutions. It is written by Te Maire Tau, David Ormsby, Marjorie Manthei and Tahu Potiki.

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W

Wild Heart
Images of pristine forests, mountain ranges, untameable rivers and empty expanses of coastline are the key attraction in how we promote Aotearoa New Zealand internationally: '100% Pure' no less. Such wildness is at this nation's psychological and physical core.