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Tackling Rugby Myths

Friday, 1 November 2013 10:46am

Rugby and New Zealand Society 1854–2004

Edited by Greg Ryan

tackling_rugby_mythsThe book

The All Blacks' 'failure' to win the 2003 Rugby World Cup led many devotees to question old certainties and the current direction of the 'national game' in the age of professionalism. Central to these debates has been a sense that the continuity and invincibility of New Zealand rugby has been somehow eroded, mirroring similar changes within society as a whole.

This book examines many aspects of rugby in New Zealand since about 1854, showing how rugby and identity have been bundled together for over a century, with both nation and game endowed with qualities of egalitarianism, innovation and rural pragmatism that have been promoted on the world stage. It tackles some of the very real myths surrounding this image of the game, disentangling assumptions from historical fact and coming up with some interesting angles on rugby's past.

The editor

GREG RYAN lectures in history at Lincoln University and is the author of The Making of New Zealand Cricket 1832–1914 (Routledge 2004).

Contributors

Frazer Andrewes, Terry Austrin, Caroline Daley, Charlotte Hughes, Camilla Obel, Len Richardson, Greg Ryan, Geoff Vincent

Publication details

Paperback, 230 x 150 mm, 256 pages, ISBN 978 1 877276 97 2, $39.95
2005
Out of print