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The Universal Dance

Friday, 1 November 2013 10:06am

A selection from the critical prose writings of Charles Brasch

Edited by J.L. Watson

The book

It is not widely known that Charles Brasch, poet and editor, was also a prose writer and lecturer of considerable critical acumen and wide-ranging interest. As a poet responding poetically to other poets, artists and thinkers, Brasch was that rare being, an idealist who bore witness to his ideals without faltering.

This volume of essays and lectures is intended to stand beside Landfall, the poetry, and the autobiography Indirections, as a record of that uncompromising vision.

The author

CHARLES BRASCH was a gifted poet, the distinguished founding editor of Landfall, and a generous and far-sighted patron of the arts. Born in Dunedin, Brasch published six volumes of poetry, and like many poets of his generation, his literary preoccupations evolved from issues of the nation towards broader and more personal concerns. As Landfall editor, Brasch did much to establish a perspective that was (in his phrase) ‘distinctly of New Zealand without being parochial’. Among other philanthropic work, Brasch founded the Burns Fellowship and gifted his extensive collection of New Zealand literature to the Hocken Library.

The editor

J.L. WATSON recently retired as senior lecturer in English at the University of Otago.

Publication details

Hardback, 220 pages, ISBN 978 0 908569 26 7, $16.95
1981
Out of print