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Professor Harlene Hayne

Harlene Hayne

Email hayne@psy.otago.ac.nz

Professor Harlene Hayne has maintained uninterrupted extramural funding for her research and has published over 100 scholarly books, chapters, and journal articles. To date, she has successfully supervised 20 PhD students and 25 Master's students.

Professor Hayne is a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand and of the American Psychological Society. She has served on the Royal Society's Academy Council, the Marsden Fund Council, and the New Zealand National Science Panel. She is the Associate Editor of Psychological Review and of the New Zealand Journal of Psychology and she serves on the editorial boards of 5 additional international journals.

In 2009, she was awarded a New Zealand Royal Honour, Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit (ONZM), for services to scientific and medical research. She was recently appointed by the American Ambassador to NZ/US Fulbright Board. Professor Hayne is the Past President of the International Society for Developmental Psychobiology and is a member of other international associations, including the Society for Research in Child Development, the International Society for Infant Studies, and the Society for Applied Research in Memory and Cognition. Professor Hayne is also Co-Chair of the working party, Reducing Social and Psychological Morbidity during Adolescence, which reports directly to the Office of the Prime Minister. She is the co-director of the New Zealand Innocence Project and she is now Vice-Chancellor of the University of Otago.

Harlene holds a PhD in Behavioural Neuroscience from Rutgers University. She joined the University of Otago in 1992 following three years at Princeton University as a postdoctoral fellow. She was awarded a personal chair in psychology at the University of Otago in 2002 and she was Head of the Psychology Department for three years before being appointed as the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research & Enterprise).

Research Interests

  • Memory development
  • Interviews with children in clinical and legal contexts
  • Risk taking during adolescence

Find out more about Professor Hayne's research interests

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Publications

Jack, F., Simcock, G., & Hayne, H. (2012). Magic memories: Young children's verbal recall after a 6-year delay. Child Development, 83(1), 159-172. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01699.x

Tustin, K., & Hayne, H. (2010). Defining the boundary: Age-related changes in childhood amnesia. Developmental Psychology, 46(5), 1049-1061. doi: 10.1037/a0020105

Scarf, D., Hayne, H., & Colombo, M. (2011). Pigeons on par with primates in numerical competence. Science, 334(6063), 1664. doi: 10.1126/science.1213357

Pharo, H., Sim, C., Graham, M., Gross, J., & Hayne, H. (2011). Risky business: Executive function, personality, and reckless behavior during adolescence and emerging adulthood. Behavioral Neuroscience, 125(6), 970-978. doi: 10.1037/a0025768

Colombo, M., & Hayne, H. (2010). Episodic memory: Comparative and developmental issues. In M. S. Blumberg, J. H. Freeman & S. R. Robinson (Eds.), Oxford handbook of developmental behavioral neuroscience. (pp. 617-636). Oxford University Press.

Chapter in Book - Research

Colombo, M., & Hayne, H. (2010). Episodic memory: Comparative and developmental issues. In M. S. Blumberg, J. H. Freeman & S. R. Robinson (Eds.), Oxford handbook of developmental behavioral neuroscience. (pp. 617-636). Oxford University Press.

Hayne, H. (2010). Learning and memory during infancy. In J. Low & P. Jose (Eds.), Lifespan development: New Zealand perspectives. (2nd ed.) (pp. 24-31). Auckland, New Zealand: Pearson.

Hayne, H., & Richmond, J. (2008). Memory. In M. M. Haith & J. B. Benson (Eds.), Encyclopedia of infant and early childhood development. (pp. 290-301). Amsterdam: Academic.

Hayne, H. (2007). Verbal recall of preverbal memories: Implications for the clinic and the courtroom. In M. Garry & H. Hayne (Eds.), Do justice and let the sky fall: Elizabeth F. Loftus and her contributions to science, law, and academic freedom. (pp. 79-103). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Hayne, H. (2007). Infant memory development: New questions, new answers. In L. M. Oakes & P. J. Bauer (Eds.), Short- and long-term memory in infancy and early childhood: Taking the first steps toward remembering. (pp. 209-239). Oxford University Press.

Hayne, H. (2006). Age-related changes in infant memory retrieval: Implications for knowledge acquisition. In Y. Munakata & M. H. Johnson (Eds.), Processes of change in brain and cognitive development: Attention and performance XXI. (pp. 209-231). Oxford University Press.

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Journal - Research Article

Scarf, D., Gross, J., Colombo, M., & Hayne, H. (2013). To have and to hold: Episodic memory in 3- and 4-year-old children. Developmental Psychobiology, 55(2), 125-132. doi: 10.1002/dev.21004

Jack, F., Simcock, G., & Hayne, H. (2012). Magic memories: Young children's verbal recall after a 6-year delay. Child Development, 83(1), 159-172. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01699.x

Morgan, K., & Hayne, H. (2011). Age-related changes in visual recognition memory during infancy and early childhood. Developmental Psychobiology, 53(2), 157-165. doi: 10.1002/dev.20503

Pharo, H., Gross, J., Richardson, R., & Hayne, H. (2011). Age-related changes in the effect of ostracism. Social Influence, 6(1), 22-38. doi: 10.1080/15534510.2010.525852

Willcock, E., Imuta, K., & Hayne, H. (2011). Children's human figure drawings do not measure intellectual ability. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 110(3), 444-452. doi: 10.1016/j.jecp.2011.04.013

Hayne, H., & Jack, F. (2011). Childhood amnesia. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science, 2(2), 136-145. doi: 10.1002/wcs.107

Patterson, T., & Hayne, H. (2011). Does drawing facilitate older children's reports of emotionally laden events? Applied Cognitive Psychology, 25(1), 119-126. doi: 10.1002/acp.1650

Hayne, H., & Imuta, K. (2011). Episodic memory in 3- and 4-year-old children. Developmental Psychobiology, 53(3), 317-322. doi: 10.1002/dev.20527

Hayne, H., Gross, J., McNamee, S., Fitzgibbon, O., & Tustin, K. (2011). Episodic memory and episodic foresight in 3- and 5-year-old children. Cognitive Development, 26, 343-355. doi: 10.1016/j.cogdev.2011.09.006

Pharo, H., Sim, C., Graham, M., Gross, J., & Hayne, H. (2011). Risky business: Executive function, personality, and reckless behavior during adolescence and emerging adulthood. Behavioral Neuroscience, 125(6), 970-978. doi: 10.1037/a0025768

Scarf, D., Hayne, H., & Colombo, M. (2011). Pigeons on par with primates in numerical competence. Science, 334(6063), 1664. doi: 10.1126/science.1213357

Tustin, K., & Hayne, H. (2010). Defining the boundary: Age-related changes in childhood amnesia. Developmental Psychology, 46(5), 1049-1061. doi: 10.1037/a0020105

Jack, F., & Hayne, H. (2010). Childhood amnesia: Empirical evidence for a two-stage phenomenon. Memory, 18(8), 831-844. doi: 10.1080/09658211.2010.510476

Jack, F., MacDonald, S., Reese, E., & Hayne, H. (2009). Maternal reminiscing style during early childhood predicts the age of adolescents' earliest memories. Child Development, 80(2), 496-505. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2009.01274.x

Candel, I., Hayne, H., Strange, D., & Prevoo, E. (2009). The effect of suggestion on children's recognition memory for seen and unseen details. Psychology, Crime & Law, 15(1), 29-39. doi: 10.1080/10683160802084850

Gross, J., Hayne, H., & Drury, T. (2009). Drawing facilitates children's reports of factual and narrative information: Implications for educational contexts. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 23(7), 953-971. doi: 10.1002/acp.1518

Davis, N., Gross, J., & Hayne, H. (2008). Defining the boundary of childhood amnesia. Memory, 16(5), 465-474. doi: 10.1080/09658210802077082

Strange, D., Hayne, H., & Garry, M. (2008). A photo, a suggestion, a false memory. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 22, 587-603. doi: 10.1002/acp.1390

Strange, D., Wade, K., & Hayne, H. (2008). Creating false memories for events that occurred before versus after the offset of childhood amnesia. Memory, 16(5), 475-484. doi: 10.1080/09658210802059049

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