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Sciences Lectures

Students taking notes in a lecture

This page hosts Inaugural Professorial Lectures, public lectures and events from the Division of Sciences. They appear in reverse chronological order, so the most recent are at the top.

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IPL: Earthquakes, Quaternary faults, and seismic hazard in New Zealand and beyond (433.84 MB)
Tuesday, 28 March 2017
Professor Professor Mark Stirling's inauguaral lecture: 14 March 2017

IPL David O'Hare - Above Us Only Sky: Human Error, Accidents, and Aviation Safety (64.51 MB)
Tuesday, 27 September 2016
The talk describes David's personal journey as a pilot and psychologist to understand the role of decision making in aviation safety.

IPL David O'Hare - Above Us Only Sky: Human Error, Accidents, and Aviation Safety (159.63 MB)
Tuesday, 27 September 2016
The talk describes David's personal journey as a pilot and psychologist to understand the role of decision making in aviation safety.

IPL - Abby Smith - Sea, Sand, Shells (145.59 MB)
Tuesday, 9 August 2016
Prof Abby Smith has been fascinated by shells and how they are formed since she was a child. She takes us on a journey with her, and we learn that shells have a lot to tell us!

IPL - Abby Smith - Sea, Sand, Shells (55.67 MB)
Tuesday, 9 August 2016
Prof Abby Smith has been fascinated by shells and how they are formed since she was a child. She takes us on a journey with her, and we learn that shells have a lot to tell us!

IPL Lisette Burrows "I like the sausage sizzle but it makes me feel gulty" - Shaping the healthy child in obesogenic times. (120.82 MB)
Tuesday, 17 May 2016
Professor Lisette Burrows of the School of Physical Education, Sport and Exercise Sciences gave her Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 19th of April, 2016. She talks about her research into teh demonising or larger body shapes and how effective - or not - the current educational campaigns are in providing balanced information about healthy eating and exercise, and whether in fact there is an obesity epidemic. It was very thought provoking and engaging - have a listen!

IPL Lisette Burrows "I like the sausage sizzle but it makes me feel gulty" - Shaping the healthy child in obesogenic times. (73.87 MB)
Tuesday, 17 May 2016
Professor Lisette Burrows of the School of Physical Education, Sport and Exercise Sciences gave her Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 19th of April, 2016. She talks about her research into teh demonising or larger body shapes and how effective - or not - the current educational campaigns are in providing balanced information about healthy eating and exercise, and whether in fact there is an obesity epidemic. It was very thought provoking and engaging - have a listen!

IPL Cliff Law "Between the sea and the sky: marine microbes, chemistry and climate" (138.86 MB)
Friday, 13 May 2016
Professor Cliff Law delivered his Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 16th of February. Professor Law holds a joint appointment between Otago and NIWA, exploring the chemical interactions at the interface between the sea and the sky.

IPL Cliff Law "Between the sea and the sky: marine microbes, chemistry and climate" (67.10 MB)
Friday, 13 May 2016
Professor Cliff Law delivered his Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 16th of February. Professor Law holds a joint appointment between Otago and NIWA, exploring the chemical interactions at the interface between the sea and the sky.

IPL David Hutchinson "Curiosity doesn't kill the cat". (229.94 MB)
Thursday, 12 May 2016
Professor David Hutchinson delivered his IPL on the 15th of December, exploring theories of light as wave and particle, explaining that the description of something is not necessarily its reality, and talking about how his theoretical work builds into the exciting research taking place the Dodd-Walls Centre for Photonics and Quantum Technologies.

IPL David Hutchinson "Curiosity doesn't kill the cat". (74.49 MB)
Thursday, 12 May 2016
Professor David Hutchinson delivered his IPL on the 15th of December, exploring theories of light as wave and particle, explaining that the description of something is not necessarily its reality, and talking about how his theoretical work builds into the exciting research taking place the Dodd-Walls Centre for Photonics and Quantum Technologies.

IPL David Larsen: Therapeutic molecules from sweet sugars and toxic gases (66.84 MB)
Monday, 18 April 2016
Professor David Larsen delivered his IPL on the 17th of November in 2015. He described his work in synthesising organic molecules . This work is in collaboration with biologists primarily, developing therapeutic molecules - PIMs - aimed at reducing asthma, and also looking at molecules designed to slowly release carbon monoxide to support organ transport. This very practical work has required entirely new methodologies and many years' dedication.

IPL David Larsen: Therapeutic molecules from sweet sugars and toxic gases (135.81 MB)
Monday, 18 April 2016
Professor David Larsen delivered his IPL on the 17th of November in 2015. He described his work in synthesising organic molecules . This work is in collaboration with biologists primarily, developing therapeutic molecules - PIMs - aimed at reducing asthma, and also looking at molecules designed to slowly release carbon monoxide to support organ transport. This very practical work has required entirely new methodologies and many years' dedication.

John Smaillie Tennant Lecture : David Bowman "Humans and fire in Australian food webs from the Pleistocene to the Anthropocene" (124.78 MB)
Friday, 6 November 2015
Professor David Bowman discusses the complex interactions between fire and food webs, and the part humans have played in manipulating that system; how fire impacts on biodiversity, and how some animal species impact on the severity of landscape fires.

John Smaillie Tennant Lecture : David Bowman "Humans and fire in Australian food webs from the Pleistocene to the Anthropocene" (70.91 MB)
Friday, 6 November 2015
Professor David Bowman discusses the complex interactions between fire and food webs, and the part humans have played in manipulating that system; how fire impacts on biodiversity, and how some animal species impact on the severity of landscape fires.

Geoff Baylis Lecture 2009 - Steve Higgins " The Discovery of slowness - life in the plant lane" (137.81 MB)
Wednesday, 4 November 2015
The Geoff Baylis lectures are a joint initiative between the Otago Botanical Society and the Department of Botany, University of Otago. Steve higgins talks about how impressive plants really are - the biggest, tallest, oldest and most dangerous living oprganisms on teh planet. He discusses how grasses evolved and changed the face of the planet, and how leaf phenology can help us map changes in atmosphere and climate. This lecture was given on the 9th of September 2015

Geoff Baylis Lecture 2009 - Steve Higgins " The Discovery of slowness - life in the plant lane" (76.92 MB)
Wednesday, 4 November 2015
The Geoff Baylis lectures are a joint initiative between the Otago Botanical Society and the Department of Botany, University of Otago. Steve higgins talks about how impressive plants really are - the biggest, tallest, oldest and most dangerous living oprganisms on teh planet. He discusses how grasses evolved and changed the face of the planet, and how leaf phenology can help us map changes in atmosphere and climate. This lecture was given on the 9th of September 2015

Sir Geoffrey Palmer: Climate change in New Zealand - is it doom or can we hope? gases to rotary motors (51.55 MB)
Wednesday, 28 October 2015
Sir Geoffrey Palmer reflects on regulatory efforts to deal with Climate Change, both in New Zealand and internationally. He describes climate change as a slow motion tragedy, and discusses mitigation of the effects of anthropogenic climate change. This lecture was given at University of Otago on Monday 5th of October 2015.

Sir Geoffrey Palmer: Climate change in New Zealand - is it doom or can we hope? gases to rotary motors (162.61 MB)
Wednesday, 28 October 2015
Sir Geoffrey Palmer reflects on regulatory efforts to deal with Climate Change, both in New Zealand and internationally. He describes climate change as a slow motion tragedy, and discusses mitigation of the effects of anthropogenic climate change. This lecture was given at University of Otago on Monday 5th of October 2015.

IPL: Nancy Longnecker "Effective Science Communication - a scientific approach (75.66 MB)
Tuesday, 20 October 2015
Professor Nancy Longnecker delivered her Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 15th of September 2015. Nancy's journey from Biologist to communicator to researcher in Sciecne communication has been a fascinating one, and her current work in evaluation of science communication experiences is vital in validating, fine-tuning and and sometimes revolutionising the field.

IPL: Nancy Longnecker "Effective Science Communication - a scientific approach (260.07 MB)
Tuesday, 20 October 2015
Professor Nancy Longnecker delivered her Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 15th of September 2015. Nancy's journey from Biologist to communicator to researcher in Sciecne communication has been a fascinating one, and her current work in evaluation of science communication experiences is vital in validating, fine-tuning and and sometimes revolutionising the field.

Leonard Cockayne Lecture - Janice Lord "Flowers in the fridge" (95.96 MB)
Tuesday, 13 October 2015
Janice Lord won this year's Leonard Cockayne prize from the New Zealand Royal Society. This is her commemorative lecture, outlining cutting edge work on the pollination of sub-antarctic plants. There's a number of large, brightly coloured flowering plants in the sub-antactic, which is a sharp contrast with NZ alpine plants with thei predominantly white flowers. Janice explores the reasons for both of these phenomena. The talk was given on the 3rd of September 2015.

Leonard Cockayne Lecture - Janice Lord "Flowers in the fridge" (64.13 MB)
Tuesday, 13 October 2015
Janice Lord won this year's Leonard Cockayne prize from the New Zealand Royal Society. This is her commemorative lecture, outlining cutting edge work on the pollination of sub-antarctic plants. There's a number of large, brightly coloured flowering plants in the sub-antactic, which is a sharp contrast with NZ alpine plants with thei predominantly white flowers. Janice explores the reasons for both of these phenomena. The talk was given on the 3rd of September 2015.

IPL: Christina Hulbe "West Antarctic building blocks" (162.63 MB)
Wednesday, 30 September 2015
Professor Christina Hulbe gave her Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 1st of September 2015. She talked about her work on mapping deformations in West Antarctica, and how GPS technology has changed her work. Satellite imagery of meltwater ponds has led to a clearer understanding of the creation of deep crevasses and shattering of icesheets.

IPL: Christina Hulbe "West Antarctic building blocks" (60.45 MB)
Wednesday, 30 September 2015
Professor Christina Hulbe gave her Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 1st of September 2015. She talked about her work on mapping deformations in West Antarctica, and how GPS technology has changed her work. Satellite imagery of meltwater ponds has led to a clearer understanding of the creation of deep crevasses and shattering of icesheets.

Luminescence - The Lightbenders: How black holes influence light (325.88 MB)
Tuesday, 29 September 2015
The Physics Department celebrated the International Year of Light with its luminescence festival. Here is one of the talks, from Jorg Frauendiener. Jorg explains how black holes happen, what they do to light and why.

Luminescence - Peeking and poking at atoms using laser light (315.45 MB)
Monday, 28 September 2015
The Physics Department celebrated the International Year of Light with its luminescence festival. Here is one of the talks, from Niels Kjaergaard who works in the Centre for Quantum Science. Niels talks about manipulating groups of atoms, dividing them, the patterns they make etc.

Luminescence - Discovering other worlds (509.40 MB)
Monday, 28 September 2015
The Physics Department celebrated the International Year of Light with its luminescence festival. Here is one of the talks, from Eyal Schwartz. Eyal talks about discovering other planets and just how hard that can be; the techniques and tools scientists use to track down exo-planets.

IPL: David Bryant "Proofs and Evolution" (66.38 MB)
Wednesday, 16 September 2015
Professor David Bryant delivered his Inaugural Professorial lecture on July 21st 2015. He gave an overview of his work, modelling genetic information to assist with tracing points of origin for plants or animal species.

IPL: David Bryant "Proofs and Evolution" (222.61 MB)
Wednesday, 16 September 2015
Professor David Bryant delivered his Inaugural Professorial lecture on July 21st 2015. He gave an overview of his work, modelling genetic information to assist with tracing points of origin for plants or animal species.

IPL: Liz Slooten "Whales, dolphins, science and conservation" (66.09 MB)
Monday, 31 August 2015
Professor Liz Slooten delivered her Inaugural Professorial Lecture to a packed theatre on Tuesday 24th of August. The lecture gave an overview of Professor Slooten's work documenting populations of Hector's and Maui dolphones aorund New Zealand's coast as well as tracking and documenting bahaviour of sperm whales and right whalee. Professor Slooten's work highlights the dangers of gill-net fishing and the impact it has on endangered species of marine mammals.

IPL: Liz Slooten "Whales, dolphins, science and conservation" (150.92 MB)
Monday, 31 August 2015
Professor Liz Slooten delivered her Inaugural Professorial Lecture to a packed theatre on Tuesday 24th of August. The lecture gave an overview of Professor Slooten's work documenting populations of Hector's and Maui dolphones aorund New Zealand's coast as well as tracking and documenting bahaviour of sperm whales and right whalee. Professor Slooten's work highlights the dangers of gill-net fishing and the impact it has on endangered species of marine mammals.

Our Energy and Climate Challenges - Professor Stephen Chu (202.45 MB)
Friday, 26 June 2015
1997 Nobel Laureate Professor Stephen Chu talks about his role as Secretary for energy in the Obama administration, whether peak oil is the real problem, and what will make a difference in the uptake of sustainable energy technologies. This lecture was delivered on December 17th 2014

Our Energy and Climate Challenges - Professor Stephen Chu (79.98 MB)
Friday, 26 June 2015
1997 Nobel Laureate Professor Stephen Chu talks about his role as Secretary for energy in the Obama administration, whether peak oil is the real problem, and what will make a difference in the uptake of sustainable energy technologies. This lecture was delivered on December 17th 2014

IPL: Phil Seddon "Re-introduction Biology: restoring species in a changing world" (144.18 MB)
Tuesday, 12 May 2015
Professor Phil Seddon discusses the pros and cons of re-introducing species that have become extinct; the possibilities of reviving populations by translocation; the need to re-aquaint ourselves with the wildlife on our doorstep, in an increasingly urbanised world.

IPL: Phil Seddon "Re-introduction Biology: restoring species in a changing world" (58.16 MB)
Tuesday, 12 May 2015
Professor Phil Seddon discusses the pros and cons of re-introducing species that have become extinct; the possibilities of reviving populations by translocation; the need to re-aquaint ourselves with the wildlife on our doorstep, in an increasingly urbanised world.

IPL: Steve Wing "Southern ocean ecosystems" (133.93 MB)
Tuesday, 12 May 2015
Professor Steve Wing's research explores the interconnectedness of ocean ecosystems - the physical and chemical processes and how they impact on the food webs, how spatial factors impact on population resilience and so on. This work has been applied with considerable success in the Fiordland area where marine reserves have led to stronger populations across the ecosystem.

IPL: Steve Wing "Southern ocean ecosystems" (58.45 MB)
Tuesday, 12 May 2015
Professor Steve Wing's research explores the interconnectedness of ocean ecosystems - the physical and chemical processes and how they impact on the food webs, how spatial factors impact on population resilience and so on. This work has been applied with considerable success in the Fiordland area where marine reserves have led to stronger populations across the ecosystem.

IPL: Phil Bishop "The survival of the Earth depends on frogs". (221.96 MB)
Tuesday, 12 May 2015
Professor Phil Bishop talks about his lifelong fascination with amphibians in general and frogs in particular. He discusses the importance of frogs as an indicator species for the wellbeing of our environment, and delivers lessons in acoustic identification - as each species of frog has a unique sound. The inaugural professorial lecture was delivered on May the 5th 2015.

IPL: Phil Bishop "The survival of the Earth depends on frogs". (92.35 MB)
Tuesday, 12 May 2015
Professor Phil Bishop talks about his lifelong fascination with amphibians in general and frogs in particular. He discusses the importance of frogs as an indicator species for the wellbeing of our environment, and delivers lessons in acoustic identification - as each species of frog has a unique sound. The inaugural professorial lecture was delivered on May the 5th 2015.

Professor Lyall Hanton - The world of Joseph Mellor (85.93 MB)
Wednesday, 22 April 2015
Professor Lyall Hanton is both HOD Chemistry and the Mellor Professor at University of Otago. In this talk he outlines the amazing life of Joseph Mellor - a man who overcame his circumstances to become one of Otago's brightest stars.

Saturated fat and heart disease: why butter won't melt in my mouth (64.19 MB)
Wednesday, 22 April 2015
Professor Rod Jackson talks about the current debate over saturated fats,and the evidence some writers choose to ignore.He highlights the direct relationship between the drop in saturated fats in our diet and the drop of cardiovascular heart disease.This talk was delivered on the 19th of March.

Professor Lyall Hanton - The world of Joseph Mellor (55.17 MB)
Wednesday, 22 April 2015
Professor Lyall Hanton is both HOD Chemistry and the Mellor Professor at University of Otago. In this talk he outlines the amazing life of Joseph Mellor - a man who overcame his circumstances to become one of Otago's brightest stars.

Saturated fat and heart disease: why butter won't melt in my mouth (323.52 MB)
Wednesday, 22 April 2015
Professor Rod Jackson talks about the current debate over saturated fats,and the evidence some writers choose to ignore.He highlights the direct relationship between the drop in saturated fats in our diet and the drop of cardiovascular heart disease.This talk was delivered on the 19th of March.

Baylis Lecture 2014: Dr Peter johnson - "Long leaves and fat roots" (86.88 MB)
Friday, 3 October 2014
The 2014 Baylis lecture was delivers by Dr peter Johnson from Landcare's Dunedin Office. Peter talked about the work of Geoff Baylis who was head of the Botany Department for many years. His lecture looked at the functionality and curiosity of long leaved plants, and those with fat roots also - a wealth of fascinating details, all delivered as part of the Botany Department's 90th anniversary celebrations on the 10th of September

Baylis Lecture 2014: Dr Peter johnson - "Long leaves and fat roots" (198.41 MB)
Friday, 3 October 2014
The 2014 Baylis lecture was delivers by Dr peter Johnson from Landcare's Dunedin Office. Peter talked about the work of Geoff Baylis who was head of the Botany Department for many years. His lecture looked at the functionality and curiosity of long leaved plants, and those with fat roots also - a wealth of fascinating details, all delivered as part of the Botany Department's 90th anniversary celebrations on the 10th of September

IPCC Report: the latest climate change assessments - what are the implications for our communities? (116.89 MB)
Tuesday, 30 September 2014
Drs Andy Reisinger and Judy Lawrence discuss the latest IPCC report, with a particular focus on the chapters based on Australia and New Zealand. The talk was sponsored by OERC, CSAFE and the Otago Climate Change Network

IPCC Report: the latest climate change assessments - what are the implications for our communities? (62.11 MB)
Tuesday, 30 September 2014
Drs Andy Reisinger and Judy Lawrence discuss the latest IPCC report, with a particular focus on the chapters based on Australia and New Zealand. The talk was sponsored by OERC, CSAFE and the Otago Climate Change Network

China's wonder fibres - wild silk, silk cocoon and bamboo (59.26 MB)
Monday, 29 September 2014
Professor Xungai Wang presents a special lecture, made possible by the Confucius Institute. He talks about the special properties of wild silk as well as the claims made about bamboo fibres, and why those claims aren't always as straightforward as they seem.

China's wonder fibres - wild silk, silk cocoon and bamboo (160.16 MB)
Monday, 29 September 2014
Professor Xungai Wang presents a special lecture, made possible by the Confucius Institute. He talks about the special properties of wild silk as well as the claims made about bamboo fibres, and why those claims aren't always as straightforward as they seem.

IPL: Steve Higgins "Assembling a plant ecology" (56.86 MB)
Monday, 22 September 2014
Professor Steve Higgins delivered his Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 3rd of June 2014. Steve talked about the challenges of forecasting ecological developments, due to the many and varied factors that come into play. Humboldt's descriptive empirical work is contrasted with MacArthur's theoretical work, and the usefulness of modeling, in spite of its contingencies and complexities, is outlined.

IPL: Blair Blakie "Ultra-Cool Quantum Physics" (70.66 MB)
Monday, 22 September 2014
Professor Blair Blakie's Inaugural Professorial Lecture was delivered on the 6th of May 2014. Blair talked about ultra-cold atoms, superfluids and superconductors, how useful quantum physics can be to explain other complex and unpredictable systems in nature, and techniques for cooling atoms down to a billionth of a kelvin above absolute zero. Seriously cool...

IPL: Blair Blakie "Ultra-Cool Quantum Physics" (186.13 MB)
Monday, 22 September 2014
Professor Blair Blakie's Inaugural Professorial Lecture was delivered on the 6th of May 2014. Blair talked about ultra-cold atoms, superfluids and superconductors, how useful quantum physics can be to explain other complex and unpredictable systems in nature, and techniques for cooling atoms down to a billionth of a kelvin above absolute zero. Seriously cool...

IPL: Steve Higgins "Assembling a plant ecology" (115.68 MB)
Monday, 22 September 2014
Professor Steve Higgins delivered his Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 3rd of June 2014. Steve talked about the challenges of forecasting ecological developments, due to the many and varied factors that come into play. Humboldt's descriptive empirical work is contrasted with MacArthur's theoretical work, and the usefulness of modeling, in spite of its contingencies and complexities, is outlined.

IPL: Craig Rodger- Zombie Satellites, Killer Electrons and AARDDVARK Radio and Space Physics (169.48 MB)
Monday, 15 September 2014
Professor Craig Rodger delivers his IPL in energetic style - outlining the nature of radiation belts and his research into solar wind, the ionisation of the ozone. The lecture was delivered on the 18th of March

IPL: Jamin Halberstadt "The 'shipping news- adventures with morphs and averages" (190.63 MB)
Monday, 15 September 2014
Professor Halberstadt discusses the way that morphing faces makes them more attractive. he discusses te idea of fluency, or the ease of processing for the brain that makes something more appealing to us, simply because it s easier to figure out. Professor Halberstadt gave his Inaugural Professorial Lecture in the 19th of November 2013

IPL: Jamin Halberstadt "The 'shipping news- adventures with morphs and averages" (68.00 MB)
Monday, 15 September 2014
Professor Halberstadt discusses the way that morphing faces makes them more attractive. he discusses te idea of fluency, or the ease of processing for the brain that makes something more appealing to us, simply because it s easier to figure out. Professor Halberstadt gave his Inaugural Professorial Lecture in the 19th of November 2013

IPL: Craig Rodger- Zombie Satellites, Killer Electrons and AARDDVARK Radio and Space Physics (63.89 MB)
Monday, 15 September 2014
Professor Craig Rodger delivers his IPL in energetic style - outlining the nature of radiation belts and his research into solar wind, the ionisation of the ozone. The lecture was delivered on the 18th of March

Special Lecture: Don Eigler "Life among the atoms - an expedition to the small frontier." (158.35 MB)
Thursday, 24 July 2014
Don Eigler, winner of the 2010 Kavli prize, talks about hsi work using Scanning Tunnelling Microscopes for surface scanning and atomic manipulation.

Special Lecture: Don Eigler "Life among the atoms - an expedition to the small frontier." (58.12 MB)
Thursday, 24 July 2014
Don Eigler, winner of the 2010 Kavli prize, talks about hsi work using Scanning Tunnelling Microscopes for surface scanning and atomic manipulation.

The changing height of Aoraki/Mt Cook (173.22 MB)
Thursday, 24 July 2014
Pascal Sirguey form surveying and Nicolas Cullen from Geography talk about their work in measuring the height of Aoraki/Mt Cook after the avalanche that reshaped the mountain.

The changing height of Aoraki/Mt Cook (54.03 MB)
Thursday, 24 July 2014
Pascal Sirguey form surveying and Nicolas Cullen from Geography talk about their work in measuring the height of Aoraki/Mt Cook after the avalanche that reshaped the mountain.

Inequality, sustaunability and well-being - special lecture by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett (63.42 MB)
Friday, 30 May 2014
Professors Kate Pickett and Richard Wilkinson delivered a special lecture outlining the impact of financial inequality within a society : its impact on a range of health and well-being indicators as well as its impact on sustainability. The lecture was given on the 26th May 2014

Inequality, sustaunability and well-being - special lecture by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett (120.71 MB)
Friday, 30 May 2014
Professors Kate Pickett and Richard Wilkinson delivered a special lecture outlining the impact of financial inequality within a society : its impact on a range of health and well-being indicators as well as its impact on sustainability. The lecture was given on the 26th May 2014

Special lecture: Damien Bailey "Oxygen, Evolution an your gas-guzzling brain" (72.15 MB)
Monday, 12 May 2014
Damien Bailey delivered this special lecture while he was a visiting researcher at otago's School of Physical Education, Sports and Exercise Science. The talk was delivered on April 29th 2014

Special lecture: Damien Bailey "Oxygen, Evolution an your gas-guzzling brain" (49.24 MB)
Monday, 12 May 2014
Damien Bailey delivered this special lecture while he was a visiting researcher at otago's School of Physical Education, Sports and Exercise Science. The talk was delivered on April 29th 2014

Ted Scambos : Antarctica in the palm of your hand - a science tour of the icesheet (212.36 MB)
Thursday, 27 March 2014
Dr Ted Scambos was at Otago in March of 2014, working wtih Prof Christina Hulbe on a research project funded by the NZ Antartic Research institute. He gave this special lecture outlining the special characteristics of various parts of the icesheet, how their topography had been mapped, and which areas were most susceptible to melting due to shifts in ocean temperature.

Ted Scambos : Antarctica in the palm of your hand - a science tour of the icesheet (70.74 MB)
Thursday, 27 March 2014
Dr Ted Scambos was at Otago in March of 2014, working wtih Prof Christina Hulbe on a research project funded by the NZ Antartic Research institute. He gave this special lecture outlining the special characteristics of various parts of the icesheet, how their topography had been mapped, and which areas were most susceptible to melting due to shifts in ocean temperature.

OZONE presentation 2013: Lullabies or Lady Gaga? (19.48 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
yu-Chieh Tzeng talks about the importance of controlling Blood pressure variability,to minimise brain injury after stroke. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Daring to Dream (17.60 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
Professor Janet Hoek talks about the Aspire 2025 campaign, which aims to make New Zealand smoke-free by 2025 Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Lullabies or Lady Gaga? (9.01 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
Yu-Chieh Tzeng talks about the importance of controlling Blood pressure variability,to minimise brain injury after stroke. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Unattended moments (31.20 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
Dr Simone Celine Marshall discusses medieval imagery in the Modernist writers' aesthetic. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Inspired by Nature (58.71 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
Bill Hawkins talks about the importance of synthesizing bioactive substances - particularly in developing therapies. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Unattended moments (11.74 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
Dr Simone Celine Marshall discusses medieval imagery in the Modernist writers' aesthetic. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Inspired by Nature (16.43 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
Bill Hawkins talks about the importance of synthesizing bioactive substances - particularly in developing therapies. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Introduction (30.18 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
Dr Guy Jameson and professor Richard Blaikie introduce the presentations by the Ozone group. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Introduction (9.64 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
Dr Guy Jameson and professor Richard Blaikie introduce the presentations by the Ozone group. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Daring to Dream (35.75 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
Professor Janet Hoek talks about the Aspire 2025 campaign, which aims to make New Zealand smoke-free by 2025 Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Ancient DNA (39.73 MB)
Friday, 21 March 2014
Professor Lisa Matisoo-Smith talks about work on ancient DNA, and the light thrown on migration across East Polynesia.The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Law and Ethics (36.96 MB)
Friday, 21 March 2014
Professor Mark Heneghan talks about working on hte Human Genome project and the ethical questions raised. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Ancient DNA (18.14 MB)
Friday, 21 March 2014
Professor Lisa Matisoo-Smith talks about work on ancient DNA, and the light thrown on migration across East Polynesia.The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Law and Ethics (13.87 MB)
Friday, 21 March 2014
Professor Mark Heneghan talks about working on hte Human Genome project and the ethical questions raised. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

Sex, Drugs and Olympic Gold- Helen Lenskyj (38.65 MB)
Friday, 6 December 2013
Dr Helen Lenskyj was a William Evans Fellow with teh School of physical Education, Sport and Exercise Sciecne in 2013. This public lecture addresses the persistent feminisation of women athletes in olympic sport.

Sex, Drugs and Olympic Gold- Helen Lenskyj (101.11 MB)
Friday, 6 December 2013
Dr Helen Lenskyj was a William Evans Fellow with teh School of physical Education, Sport and Exercise Sciecne in 2013. This public lecture addresses the persistent feminisation of women athletes in olympic sport.

Get off the Grass - Shaun Hendy (70.11 MB)
Friday, 6 December 2013
Professor Shaun Hendy gives a tour of the book he wrote with the late Professor Sir Paul Callaghan,looking at the economics of developing a more innovative economy, and the relationship between science and innovation.

IPL: Rachel Spronken-Smith "Educating undergraduates for an uncertain future" (63.34 MB)
Tuesday, 3 December 2013
Professor Rachel Spronken-Smith's Inaugural Professorial Lecture on 3rd of December 2013. Rachel discusses the value of engaging undergraduate students in research. She explores the graduate attributes that are developed in this way, and other ways of reinforcing this learning, such as reflective and evaluative practice.

IPL: Rachel Spronken-Smith "Educating undergraduates for an uncertain future" (154.89 MB)
Tuesday, 3 December 2013
Professor Rachel Spronken-Smith's Inaugural Professorial Lecture on 3rd of December 2013. Rachel discusses the value of engaging undergraduate students in research. She explores the graduate attributes that are developed in this way, and other ways of reinforcing this learning, such as reflective and evaluative practice.

Carol Robinson: Finding the right balance - from rare gases to rotary motors (56.62 MB)
Friday, 29 November 2013
Professor Dame Carol Robinson is based at Oxford University. Se has been involved in the field of Mass spectrometry for many years, pioneering work on proteins and complex molecules and trying new things. She talks about her science and her work life balance.

Carol Robinson: Finding the right balance - from rare gases to rotary motors (130.71 MB)
Friday, 29 November 2013
Professor Dame Carol Robinson is based at Oxford University. Se has been involved in the field of Mass spectrometry for many years, pioneering work on proteins and complex molecules and trying new things. She talks about her science and her work life balance.

Get off the Grass - Shaun Hendy (125.43 MB)
Tuesday, 26 November 2013
Professor Shaun Hendy gives a tour of the book he wrote with the late Professor Sir Paul Callaghan,looking at the economics of developing a more innovative economy, and the relationship between science and innovation.

Beyond University of Otago: one graduate's story (73.23 MB)
Tuesday, 26 November 2013
Dr AnnMarie Oien completed her PhD in physics at Otago in 1996. after that things got really interesting.... AnnMarie talks about her journey, working in the US. AnnMarie is currently President of the Alumni of University of Otago in Amercia, Inc

Beyond University of Otago: one graduate's story (28.32 MB)
Tuesday, 26 November 2013
Dr AnnMarie Oien completed her PhD in physics at Otago in 1996. after that things got really interesting.... AnnMarie talks about her journey, working in the US. AnnMarie is currently President of the Alumni of University of Otago in Amercia, Inc

Living in a warmer world - Jim Salinger (61.81 MB)
Monday, 25 November 2013
Jim Salinger delivered this summary lecture as part of a tour to promote his book, Living in a Warmer World. The lecture covered the broader topics of human-generated climate change and the specific impacts we could expect in our part of the world. The lecture was given at Otago on the 31st of October

Living in a warmer world - Jim Salinger (121.88 MB)
Monday, 25 November 2013
Jim Salinger delivered this summary lecture as part of a tour to promote his book, Living in a Warmer World. The lecture covered the broader topics of human-generated climate change and the specific impacts we could expect in our part of the world. The lecture was given at Otago on the 31st of October

Distinguished Research Medal 2013: Evolution of the Body Snatchers (149.82 MB)
Wednesday, 23 October 2013
Professor Robert Poulin from the Zoology Department, talks about the intricacies of parasitic evolution and behaviour. He delivered this Distinguished Research Medal address on the 23rd of October, 2013

Distinguished Research Medal 2013: Evolution of the Body Snatchers (70.67 MB)
Wednesday, 23 October 2013
Professor Robert Poulin from the Zoology Department, talks about the intricacies of parasitic evolution and behaviour. He delivered this Distinguished Research Medal address on the 23rd of October, 2013

IPL: Anthony Robins - Teaching, learning and the music of memory (60.38 MB)
Tuesday, 17 September 2013
Professor Anthony Robins' Inaugural Public Lecture covered his passions for memory, for teaching and for education in the wider context. He explains how memory works, and the way the brain retrieves information; he discusses his work with robotics clubs in intermediate schools, and his work in developing new programming courses for the secondary school curriculum. 17 September 2013

IPL: Anthony Robins - Teaching, learning and the music of memory (136.94 MB)
Tuesday, 17 September 2013
Professor Anthony Robins' Inaugural Public Lecture covered his passions for memory, for teaching and for education in the wider context. He explains how memory works, and the way the brain retrieves information; he discusses his work with robotics clubs in intermediate schools, and his work in developing new programming courses for the secondary school curriculum. 17 September 2013

IPL: Elaine Reese "Tell me a story" (149.12 MB)
Tuesday, 3 September 2013
Professor Elaine Reese delivered her Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 3rd of September 2013. Elaine's research focuses on the importance of rich reminiscing between parent and their children - its importance for the development of language, vocabulary, memory, elf-concept and well-being in children, adolescents and young adults.

IPL: Elaine Reese "Tell me a story" (57.80 MB)
Tuesday, 3 September 2013
Professor Elaine Reese delivered her Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 3rd of September 2013. Elaine's research focuses on the importance of rich reminiscing between parent and their children - its importance for the development of language, vocabulary, memory, elf-concept and well-being in children, adolescents and young adults.

In conversation with Alan Mark (81.22 MB)
Wednesday, 7 August 2013
Professor Sir Alan Mark is an eminent conservation botanist and ecologist. Here he is interviewed by Professor Kath Dickinson, outlining his involvement in key points of conservation history in New Zealand, establishing guidelines for lakeshore management, wetland ecology and high country conservation that are still in use today.

In conversation with Alan Mark (288.12 MB)
Wednesday, 7 August 2013
Professor Sir Alan Mark is an eminent conservation botanist and ecologist. Here he is interviewed by Professor Kath Dickinson, outlining his involvement in key points of conservation history in New Zealand, establishing guidelines for lakeshore management, wetland ecology and high country conservation that are still in use today.

IPL: Jonathan Waters "Discovering prehistoric New Zealand" (119.37 MB)
Tuesday, 6 August 2013
Professor Jon Water's Inaugural Professorial Lecture on 6th of August 2013. Jon talks about genetics and how DNA can be used to map extinction and recolonization - for plants as well as animals. He talks about populations of freshwater galaxiids that have been separated by geological events, and about prehistoric sealions and penguins that became extinct with human colonisation, and how new populations have then taken the place of those prehistoric species.

IPL: Jonathan Waters "Discovering prehistoric New Zealand" (57.47 MB)
Tuesday, 6 August 2013
Professor Jon Water's Inaugural Professorial Lecture on 6th of August 2013. Jon talks about genetics and how DNA can be used to map extinction and recolonization - for plants as well as animals. He talks about populations of freshwater galaxiids that have been separated by geological events, and about prehistoric sealions and penguins that became extinct with human colonisation, and how new populations have then taken the place of those prehistoric species.

IPL: David Wharton" A world of worms" (109.80 MB)
Tuesday, 23 July 2013
ProfessorDavid Wharton's Inaugural Professorial Lecture on 23rd of July 2013. David talks about the importance of nematodes, and his particular research interests in how nematodes cope with the stress of extreme cold in Antarctica.

IPL: David Wharton" A world of worms" (49.25 MB)
Tuesday, 23 July 2013
ProfessorDavid Wharton's Inaugural Professorial Lecture on 23rd of July 2013. David talks about the importance of nematodes, and his particular research interests in how nematodes cope with the stress of extreme cold in Antarctica.

IPL: Russell Frew - Stable isotope deltas: using nature's tiny signatures to make connections in food and forensics (170.60 MB)
Tuesday, 2 July 2013
Professor Russell Frew's Inaugural Professorial Lecture on 2nd of July 2013. Russell talks about using stable isotope ratios as "fingerprints" to trace points of origin. This research technique has practical applications in food traceability, biosecurity and forensics. Russell is currently based at the IAEA.

IPL: Russell Frew - Stable isotope deltas: using nature's tiny signatures to make connections in food and forensics (63.40 MB)
Tuesday, 2 July 2013
Professor Russell Frew's Inaugural Professorial Lecture on 2nd of July 2013. Russell talks about using stable isotope ratios as "fingerprints" to trace points of origin. This research technique has practical applications in food traceability, biosecurity and forensics. Russell is currently based at the IAEA.

The Future of Sport in Small Nations Symposium: Sport, Culture and the Ministry for Culture and Heritage - Hugh Lawrence (39.48 MB)
Friday, 14 June 2013
The International Symposium on the Future of Sport in Small Nations was held on the 21st November 2012.In this talk hugh Lawrence - senior advisor for Sport and recreation in he Ministry for Culture and Heritage - talks about the intersection between sport and culture, particularly Māori culture.

The Future of Sport in Small Nations Symposium: Sport, Culture and the Ministry for Culture and Heritage - Hugh Lawrence (102.97 MB)
Friday, 14 June 2013
The International Symposium on the Future of Sport in Small Nations was held on the 21st November 2012.In this talk hugh Lawrence - senior advisor for Sport and recreation in he Ministry for Culture and Heritage - talks about the intersection between sport and culture, particularly Māori culture.

The Future of Sport in Small Nations Symposium: The Value of Sports Monitor by Fred Coalter (64.26 MB)
Friday, 14 June 2013
The International Symposium on the Future of Sport in Small Nations was held on the 21st November 2012. In this talk Professor Fred Coalter discusses the value of the Sports Monitor in evaluating the impact of sport - particularly in developing countries.

The Future of Sport in Small Nations Symposium: Introduction, and keynote from Barry Houlihan (84.24 MB)
Friday, 14 June 2013
The International Symposium on the Future of Sport in Small Nations was held on the 21st November 2012. This talk is the introduction to the symposium, by Steve Jackson and Mike Sam, followed by the keynote address by Professor Barry Houlihan, exploring comparative sport policy analysis.

The Future of Sport in Small Nations Symposium: The Value of Sports Monitor by Fred Coalter (154.46 MB)
Friday, 14 June 2013
The International Symposium on the Future of Sport in Small Nations was held on the 21st November 2012. In this talk Professor Fred Coalter discusses the value of the Sports Monitor in evaluating the impact of sport - particularly in developing countries.

IPL: Ian Jamieson : The art and science of managing threatened species (232.59 MB)
Tuesday, 4 June 2013
Professor Ian Jamieson presents his journey in the study of birds: conservation biology, the role and significance of genetic diversity, and his work in developing management tools for the recovery of threatened species such as the takahe, kokako, kakapo and others. Professor Jamieson's talk was presented on Tuesday the 4th of June 2013.

IPL: Ian Jamieson : The art and science of managing threatened species (74.69 MB)
Tuesday, 4 June 2013
Professor Ian Jamieson presents his journey in the study of birds: conservation biology, the role and significance of genetic diversity, and his work in developing management tools for the recovery of threatened species such as the takahe, kokako, kakapo and others. Professor Jamieson's talk was presented on Tuesday the 4th of June 2013.

Science Challenges - Announcement and Next Steps- Sir Peter Gluckman (53.49 MB)
Wednesday, 22 May 2013
Professor Sir Peter Gluckman is Chief Science Advisor in the Office of the Prime Minister's Science and Advisory Committee. He delivered this special lecture at University of Otago, outlining the 10 Science Challenges endorsed by Government and selected by the NZ public. He explains the process of selection, what the challenges mean, and what the next steps will be. This talk was delivered on Friday 3rd of May 2013

Science Challenges - Announcement and Next Steps- Sir Peter Gluckman (27.30 MB)
Wednesday, 22 May 2013
Professor Sir Peter Gluckman is Chief Science Advisor in the Office of the Prime Minister's Science and Advisory Committee. He delivered this special lecture at University of Otago, outlining the 10 Science Challenges endorsed by Government and selected by the NZ public. He explains the process of selection, what the challenges mean, and what the next steps will be. This talk was delivered on Friday 3rd of May 2013

IPL: Using science to save dolphins, and whaling without a harpoon (61.69 MB)
Tuesday, 7 May 2013
Professor Steve Dawson's inaugural professorial lecture was delivered on the 7th of May. He spoke about his work on Hector's dolphins, and how this research very quickly became conservation research and the small population numbers became apparent.

IPL: Using science to save dolphins, and whaling without a harpoon (149.73 MB)
Tuesday, 7 May 2013
Professor Steve Dawson's inaugural professorial lecture was delivered on the 7th of May. He spoke about his work on Hector's dolphins, and how this research very quickly became conservation research and the small population numbers became apparent.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - Viruses in the ocean: do they manage the best recycling programme on the planet? (22.51 MB)
Wednesday, 1 May 2013
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. The day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one: Steve Wilhelm explores the role of viruses in the ocean eco-system. Viruses break down bacteria making available many nutrients for the wider eco system.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - Viruses in the ocean: do they manage the best recycling programme on the planet? (15.08 MB)
Wednesday, 1 May 2013
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. The day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one: Steve Wilhelm explores the role of viruses in the ocean eco-system. Viruses break down bacteria making available many nutrients for the wider eco system.

IPL: Michael Albert "How to shuffle badly" (66.59 MB)
Tuesday, 16 April 2013
Professor Michael Albert explains complex permutation work in terms of card shuffles, good and bad. He demonstrates these kinds of good or bad shuffles, explaining how these deliver good or bad randomisation of a deck of cards. This is Professor Albert's inaugural professorial lecture, delivered on the 16th of April 2013.

IPL: Michael Albert "How to shuffle badly" (236.82 MB)
Tuesday, 16 April 2013
Professor Michael Albert explains complex permutation work in terms of card shuffles, good and bad. He demonstrates these kinds of good or bad shuffles, explaining how these deliver good or bad randomisation of a deck of cards. This is Professor Albert's inaugural professorial lecture, delivered on the 16th of April 2013.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - Climate change affects on invertebrate larvae - an example in the sea urchin centrostephanus rodgersii (18.74 MB)
Friday, 12 April 2013
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. The day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one: Dr Miles Lamare talks about how changes in climate have affected the range of Sea urchin larvae - where they live and the impact they have on eco-systems.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - The Metal Isotope Toolbox: Linking Oceans and Climate (21.24 MB)
Monday, 25 March 2013
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. The day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one: Dr Claudine Stirling talks about bio-active metals such as iron, zinc, cadmium and others, and their role in the ocean climate cycle.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - The Metal Isotope Toolbox: Linking Oceans and Climate (38.62 MB)
Monday, 25 March 2013
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. The day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one: Dr Claudine Stirling talks about bio-active metals such as iron, zinc, cadmium and others, and their role in the ocean climate cycle.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - Organic ligands - a key control on trace metal biogeochemistry in the ocean (30.56 MB)
Monday, 25 March 2013
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. The day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one: Dr Sylvia Sander talks about the vital role organic ligands play in the solubility of metals, particularly near geothermal vents. She discusses the importance of bioactive metals in food chains, in carbon, sulfur and nitrogen cycles.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - Adaptations of Southern ocean phytoplankton to iron limitation (22.49 MB)
Monday, 25 March 2013
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. The day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one:Dr Robert Strzepek talks about the way phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean have adapted to the limitations of iron available to them. Iron sources include drifting dust, melting of ice, eddies from coastlines.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - Adaptations of Southern ocean phytoplankton to iron limitation (116.81 MB)
Monday, 25 March 2013
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. The day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one:Dr Robert Strzepek talks about the way phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean have adapted to the limitations of iron available to them. Iron sources include drifting dust, melting of ice, eddies from coastlines.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - Organic ligands - a key control on trace metal biogeochemistry in the ocean (16.98 MB)
Monday, 25 March 2013
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. The day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one: Dr Sylvia Sander talks about the vital role organic ligands play in the solubility of metals, particularly near geothermal vents. She discusses the importance of bioactive metals in food chains, in carbon, sulfur and nitrogen cycles.

CSAFE seminar: Dave McKay - Education for Survival, Resilience and Continuance: Mātauranga Taiao, Māori and Indigeneity (69.95 MB)
Tuesday, 26 February 2013
PhD candidate Dave McKay talks about the lessons to be learned from Mātauranga Taiao - a complex interwoven net of connections between people, their environment and each other. This seminar was presented at CSAFE on the 29th of November 2012

"A new global climate change treaty - can humanity deliver?" (102.56 MB)
Monday, 25 February 2013
A New Global Climate Change Treaty - Can humanity deliver? Our challenge after Durban for 2015. This special lecture was delivered by Professor Jonathan Boston, School of Government Victoria University. He was hosted by CSAFE, the Centre for Science Communication, the Centre for theology and Public Issues and Generation Zero. The lecture addresses ploicy developments in relation to the new global climate change treaty proposed - the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action. The lecture was held on March 14 2012 and is followed by a panel discussion.

IPL: Social Understanding: Development across the human lifespan and in dogs (416.67 MB)
Tuesday, 22 January 2013
Professor Ted Ruffman of the department of Psychology explores the theory of mind, how emotional recognition declines in older adults and the implications of this; and whether dogs are really empathetic. This Inaugural Professorial Lecture was delivered on August 14th 2012

John Smaillie Tennant Lecture : Lesley Hughes"Climate change in Australasia: Challenges, Risks and Gaps" (63.02 MB)
Tuesday, 22 January 2013
Professor Lesley Hughes talks about the latest global and Australasian trends in observed and projected climate change, and identifies the key risks these changes pose for Australia & New Zealand. The similarities and contrasts between how Australian and New Zealand scientists and policy makers are approaching potential future challenges will also be discussed and important research gaps highlighted.Lecture given 18th September 2012

IPL: Social Understanding: Development across the human lifespan and in dogs (68.07 MB)
Tuesday, 22 January 2013
Professor Ted Ruffman of the department of Psychology explores the theory of mind, how emotional recognition declines in older adults and the implications of this; and whether dogs are really empathetic. This Inaugural Professorial Lecture was delivered on August 14th 2012

IPL: Jorg Frauendiener: "Sightseeing in Einstein's World" (184.08 MB)
Tuesday, 22 January 2013
Professor Jorg Frauendiener's IPL describes how what we see is affected when the viewer travels at close to the speed of light. There are a number of visual distortions that occur, due to Einstein's special theory of relativity. These include Lorantz' contraction, aberrations that appear to bend straight lines, and the doppler effect which shift the colours seen down the spectrum towards the blue end.

Orokonui Landmark Lecture 2012: Rod Morris-"Seven years with Superman" (97.66 MB)
Wednesday, 19 December 2012
Rod Morris worked with Don Merton for a number of years, pioneering wildlife conservation and island restorations. This lecture celebrates the life and work of Don Merton, and is entitled "Seven years with Superman". The lecture was given on 19th of September 2012.

Orokonui Landmark Lecture 2012: Rod Morris-"Seven years with Superman" (557.51 MB)
Wednesday, 19 December 2012
Rod Morris worked with Don Merton for a number of years, pioneering wildlife conservation and island restorations. This lecture celebrataes the life and workof Don Merton, and is entitled "Seven years with Superman". The lecture was given on 19th of September 2012.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - The impact of ocean acidification on New Zealand's temperate reefs (23.43 MB)
Friday, 30 November 2012
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. the day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one: Associate professor Catriona Hurd talking about the role of seaweeds in the health of ocean eco-systems, and the world eco-system - generating oxygen and providing habitat to marine species.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - The impact of ocean acidification on New Zealand's temperate reefs (15.83 MB)
Friday, 30 November 2012
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. the day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one: Associate professor Catriona Hurd talking about the role of seaweeds in the health of ocean eco-systems, and the world eco-system - generating oxygen and providing habitat to marine species.

The Future of Sport in Small Nations Symposium: Introduction, and keynote from Barry Houlihan (159.09 MB)
Wednesday, 21 November 2012
The International Symposium on the Future of Sport in Small Nations was held on the 21st November 2012. This talk is the introduction to the symposium, by Steve Jackson and Mike Sam, followed by the keynote address by Professor Barry Houlihan, exploring comparative sport policy analysis.

IPL: Dave Prior - Mapping crystals to underestand gold, glaciers and earthquakes (350.42 MB)
Thursday, 10 May 2012
Inaugural Professorial Lecture from Dave Prior, head of Geology at University of Otago. The lecture was entitled "Mapping crystals to understand gold, glaciers and earthquakes" and was delivered on Thursday the 22nd of September, 2011

IPL: Dave Prior - Mapping crystals to underestand gold, glaciers and earthquakes (60.53 MB)
Thursday, 10 May 2012
Inaugural Professorial Lecture from Dave Prior, head of Geology at University of Otago. The lecture was entitled "Mapping crystals to understand gold, glaciers and earthquakes" and was delivered on Thursday the 22nd of September, 2011

IPL: Doug Booth - From politics to pleasure: professing a philosophy of Physical Education (73.96 MB)
Thursday, 10 May 2012
Inaugural Professorial Lecture from Doug Booth, Dean of the School of Physical Education at University of Otago. Prof Booth talked about the de-pleasuring of physical activity and the need to consider both social and biological components in exploring the intrinsic benefits of physical activity. The lecture was entitled "From politics to pleasure : professing a philosophy of Physical Education" and was delivered on Wednesday the 12th of November, 2008.

IPL: Gary Wilson: Shall we lower the lifeboats? A marine ecological view of warming climates (262.16 MB)
Wednesday, 2 May 2012
Inaugural Professorial Lecture from Gary Wilson, head of Marine Science and researcher in Geology at University of Otago. The lecture was entitled "Shall we lower the lifeboats? A marine ecological view of warming climates." The lecture was delivered on Thursday the 1st of September, 2011

IPL: Gary Wilson: Shall we lower the lifeboats? A marine ecological view of warming climates - Audio (49.82 MB)
Wednesday, 2 May 2012
Inaugural Professorial Lecture from Gary Wilson, head of Marine Science and researcher in Geology at University of Otago. The lecture was entitled "Shall we lower the lifeboats? A marine ecological view of warming climates." The lecture was delivered on Thursday the 1st of September, 2011

IPL: Ken Hodge : Sports Psychology: its the thought that counts - Audio (72.12 MB)
Tuesday, 1 May 2012
Inaugural Professorial Lecture from Ken Hodge of the School of Physical Education. The lecture was entitled "Sports Psychology: It's the thought that counts." The IPL was delivered on Tuesday 17th of April 2012.

IPL: Ken Hodge : Sports Psychology; its the thought that counts - Video (427.54 MB)
Tuesday, 1 May 2012
Inaugural Professorial Lecture from Ken Hodge of the School of Physical Education. The lecture was entitled "Sports Psychology: It's the thought that counts." The IPL was delivered on Tuesday 17th of April 2012.

Geoff Baylis Lecture 2009 (69.03 MB)
Friday, 27 April 2012
The Geoff Baylis lectures are a joint initiative between the Otago Botanical Society and the Department of Botany, University of Otago. This lecture was presented by Associate Professor Daphne Lee, a paleo-botanist. The title is "Palms, Podocarps, orchids and proteads: the contribution of new fossil plants from Otago and Southland to our understanding of NZ's vegetation history." The lecture was given on the 16th of September 2009.

Setting priorities for science - special lecture by Sir Peter Gluckman (58.78 MB)
Friday, 27 April 2012
Professor Sir Peter Gluckman is Chief Science Advisor in the Office of the Prime Minister's Science and Advisory Committee. He delivered this special lecture at University of Otago, outlining priorities for science in New Zealand and in a broader context. The lecture is entitled " setting Priorities for Science" and it was delivered on Tuesday 24th April 2012.

Geoff Baylis Lecture 2009 - Video (129.08 MB)
Friday, 27 April 2012
The Geoff Baylis lectures are a joint initiative between the Otago Botanical Society and the Department of Botany, University of Otago. This lecture was presented by Associate Professor Daphne Lee, a paleo-botanist. The title is "Palms, Podocarps, orchids and proteads: the contribution of new fossil plants from Otago and Southland to our understanding of NZ's vegetation history." The lecture was given on the 16th of September 2009.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 3 (67.07 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Technologies of the body, Gregor was a research scientist at the University of Calgary, Faculty of Medicine, for 16 years before, in 2008, becoming an Assistant Professor at the University of Calgary’s, Program in Community Rehabilitation and Disability Studies. Currently, he is also a part-time Professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa in Canada. In addition, Gregor is a Distinguished Scholar in the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University, USA and Adjunct Faculty in the Critical Disability Studies at York University, Canada; the President of the Canadian Disability Studies Association and Chair of the Bioethics Taskforce of Disabled People's International. Un outil, une machine ce sont des organes, et des organes sont des outils ou des. Machines (1). (Tools and machines are kinds of organs, and organs are kinds of tools or machines; translation from (2)). Science and technology products and changing social concepts and values trigger continuously new sport and influence existing sport in general and the Olympics, Paralympics, and their relationship in particular by among others changing expectations of athletes, officials, spectators, sponsors and governments. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 2 (67.66 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Emerging technologies for performance enhancement, Damian holds a joint appointment within the School of Sport and Exercise Science / ISEAL Victoria University, and the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) where he is responsible for the provision of quality research for both institutions. Damian was appointed as the inaugural AIS Skill Acquisition Specialist (2002) a role dedicated to providing Australian coaches with an evidence-based approach to skill development. Consistent with many other disciplines of sport and exercise science, Skill Acquisition practitioners now have more sophisticated technology at their disposal for both the measurement and development of skilled performance than ever before. Despite claims boasting refined measurement sensitivity, real-time feedback performance, and enhanced interactivity and fidelity, the relative efficacy of such tools is poorly understood. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 5 (77.58 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Disciplinary technologies, Andrew graduated from Queen's University in 1974. Currently Chief of the Division of Prevention and Rehabilitation at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, he is a Professor in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Ottawa. In addition to his clinical responsibilities, Andrew has been extensively involved in sports and sport medicine for many years. Currently he is the President of the Commonwealth Games Association of Canada, has served as a physician at eight Olympic Games and has been the Team Physician for Canada's National Men's Basketball Team since 1978. A member of the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame, Andrew served as Chair of the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport from its inception until 2003. Enhancing Sport Performance: Character, Culture, Coaching or Chemistry? Attempts to enhance sport performance have traditionally reflected an accentuation of skill, a burnishing of sport-specific tactics, and an augmentation of ‘fitness’. A contemporary challenge in sport is to distinguish those enhancement strategies which are seen as in keeping with established norms of sport practice, and those which are viewed as transgressing a standard of ‘appropriate sporting behaviour’. The programmes designed to curb performance-enhancing drug use are intended to address such a challenge. Sport is practiced in accordance with rules and norms that are ultimately arbitrary. Those vested with responsibility for the preservation of ‘fair play’ apply rules that can also be seen as arbitrary – their approaches represent an application, in part, of the “disciplinary technologies” – but which seek to ensure safety, fair-play and enduring public support of sport. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 6 (71.29 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Disciplinary technologies, Jim is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Canada and Director of the Canadian Athletics Coaching Centre. A sport sociologist and coach educator, his research examines coach effectiveness and the social construction and historical formation of coaches’ practices through a Foucauldian lens. What Coaches Do: Problematizing Planning and Practice “Being a coach” largely revolves around the practice of planning what athletes need to do in training to improve and develop their potential. Three components of training that coaches control, and that greatly influence athletes’ capabilities, are the training spaces used, the monitoring of time, and the organization of exercises. The consideration of these elements, and their impact on athletes’ progression and capacity for performance, derive from Michel Foucault’s analysis of technologies of discipline. In this talk I will examine Foucault’s conceptualization of discipline and it effects on athletes’ bodies, as well as how coaches can enhance their understanding of planning and athlete development by problematizing what they have their athletes do. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 5 (136.82 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Disciplinary technologies, Andrew graduated from Queen's University in 1974. Currently Chief of the Division of Prevention and Rehabilitation at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, he is a Professor in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Ottawa. In addition to his clinical responsibilities, Andrew has been extensively involved in sports and sport medicine for many years. Currently he is the President of the Commonwealth Games Association of Canada, has served as a physician at eight Olympic Games and has been the Team Physician for Canada's National Men's Basketball Team since 1978. A member of the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame, Andrew served as Chair of the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport from its inception until 2003. Enhancing Sport Performance: Character, Culture, Coaching or Chemistry? Attempts to enhance sport performance have traditionally reflected an accentuation of skill, a burnishing of sport-specific tactics, and an augmentation of ‘fitness’. A contemporary challenge in sport is to distinguish those enhancement strategies which are seen as in keeping with established norms of sport practice, and those which are viewed as transgressing a standard of ‘appropriate sporting behaviour’. The programmes designed to curb performance-enhancing drug use are intended to address such a challenge. Sport is practiced in accordance with rules and norms that are ultimately arbitrary. Those vested with responsibility for the preservation of ‘fair play’ apply rules that can also be seen as arbitrary – their approaches represent an application, in part, of the “disciplinary technologies” – but which seek to ensure safety, fair-play and enduring public support of sport. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 2 (182.40 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Emerging technologies for performance enhancement, Damian holds a joint appointment within the School of Sport and Exercise Science / ISEAL Victoria University, and the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) where he is responsible for the provision of quality research for both institutions. Damian was appointed as the inaugural AIS Skill Acquisition Specialist (2002) a role dedicated to providing Australian coaches with an evidence-based approach to skill development. Consistent with many other disciplines of sport and exercise science, Skill Acquisition practitioners now have more sophisticated technology at their disposal for both the measurement and development of skilled performance than ever before. Despite claims boasting refined measurement sensitivity, real-time feedback performance, and enhanced interactivity and fidelity, the relative efficacy of such tools is poorly understood. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 1 (157.97 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Technologies of the body, Grant Gillett is a Professor of biomedical ethics at the University of Otago. He is also a neurosurgeon and worked in clinical practice until 2006. He studied medicine at the Auckland Medical School and also completed a Masters degree in Psychology. He became an overseas fellow in Neurosurgery at The Radcliffe Infirmary and then completed a D.Phil at Oxford University and was appointed fellow of Magdalen College in 1985. Cyborgs are human-machine complexes with prosthetic abilities. Where the enhancements remediate a defect we are prepared to acknowledge their value but where they seem to create an unfair advantage over others we feel disturbed. How good can a person be before a compensation for their disability makes them differently abled being in quite another sense. We accept and even welcome enhancement of natural abilities in officials but direct advantaging of competitors is quite another thing. Why – when does good preparation and careful optimisation of ability cross a boundary and why do we care? A range of ethical arguments will be examined to see which, if any, give us a plausible and defensible line to take on this issue. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 6 (158.09 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Disciplinary technologies, Jim is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Canada and Director of the Canadian Athletics Coaching Centre. A sport sociologist and coach educator, his research examines coach effectiveness and the social construction and historical formation of coaches’ practices through a Foucauldian lens. What Coaches Do: Problematizing Planning and Practice “Being a coach” largely revolves around the practice of planning what athletes need to do in training to improve and develop their potential. Three components of training that coaches control, and that greatly influence athletes’ capabilities, are the training spaces used, the monitoring of time, and the organization of exercises. The consideration of these elements, and their impact on athletes’ progression and capacity for performance, derive from Michel Foucault’s analysis of technologies of discipline. In this talk I will examine Foucault’s conceptualization of discipline and it effects on athletes’ bodies, as well as how coaches can enhance their understanding of planning and athlete development by problematizing what they have their athletes do. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 3 (96.58 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Technologies of the body, Gregor was a research scientist at the University of Calgary, Faculty of Medicine, for 16 years before, in 2008, becoming an Assistant Professor at the University of Calgary’s, Program in Community Rehabilitation and Disability Studies. Currently, he is also a part-time Professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa in Canada. In addition, Gregor is a Distinguished Scholar in the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University, USA and Adjunct Faculty in the Critical Disability Studies at York University, Canada; the President of the Canadian Disability Studies Association and Chair of the Bioethics Taskforce of Disabled People's International. Un outil, une machine ce sont des organes, et des organes sont des outils ou des. Machines (1). (Tools and machines are kinds of organs, and organs are kinds of tools or machines; translation from (2)). Science and technology products and changing social concepts and values trigger continuously new sport and influence existing sport in general and the Olympics, Paralympics, and their relationship in particular by among others changing expectations of athletes, officials, spectators, sponsors and governments. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 4 (146.46 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Emerging technologies for performance enhancement, Cathy is a Professor at the School of Psychology, Queen’s University Belfast. Having obtained her Ph.D. from the University of Edinburgh, she went on to take up a post-doc at the Sports Science Faculty, Marseille, France. It was here that she first encountered virtual reality. In a project funded by Adidas she was the first person to use this technology to simulate and understand the perception of curved free-kicks in soccer. Since joining QUB in 2005, she has built an immersive interactive VR lab where she is continuing to use this technology to study decision making in sport. Keynote abstract Virtual Reality Technology: How can it help us understand decision making in sport? Virtual reality provides the perfect adjunct to study perception/action and decision making in sport. It is in essence a sophisticated interactive and immersive human-computer interface where a sensory environment (visual, haptic and/or acoustic) is simulated by a computer and is controlled by the interactive behaviour of the user. It is a versatile methodological tool that gives the experimenter complete control over complex environmental conditions and allows for an in-depth analysis of the user’s behaviour. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 4 (69.30 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Emerging technologies for performance enhancement, Cathy is a Professor at the School of Psychology, Queen’s University Belfast. Having obtained her Ph.D. from the University of Edinburgh, she went on to take up a post-doc at the Sports Science Faculty, Marseille, France. It was here that she first encountered virtual reality. In a project funded by Adidas she was the first person to use this technology to simulate and understand the perception of curved free-kicks in soccer. Since joining QUB in 2005, she has built an immersive interactive VR lab where she is continuing to use this technology to study decision making in sport. Keynote abstract Virtual Reality Technology: How can it help us understand decision making in sport? Virtual reality provides the perfect adjunct to study perception/action and decision making in sport. It is in essence a sophisticated interactive and immersive human-computer interface where a sensory environment (visual, haptic and/or acoustic) is simulated by a computer and is controlled by the interactive behaviour of the user. It is a versatile methodological tool that gives the experimenter complete control over complex environmental conditions and allows for an in-depth analysis of the user’s behaviour. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 1 (75.40 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Technologies of the body, Grant Gillett is a Professor of biomedical ethics at the University of Otago. He is also a neurosurgeon and worked in clinical practice until 2006. He studied medicine at the Auckland Medical School and also completed a Masters degree in Psychology. He became an overseas fellow in Neurosurgery at The Radcliffe Infirmary and then completed a D.Phil at Oxford University and was appointed fellow of Magdalen College in 1985. Cyborgs are human-machine complexes with prosthetic abilities. Where the enhancements remediate a defect we are prepared to acknowledge their value but where they seem to create an unfair advantage over others we feel disturbed. How good can a person be before a compensation for their disability makes them differently abled being in quite another sense. We accept and even welcome enhancement of natural abilities in officials but direct advantaging of competitors is quite another thing. Why – when does good preparation and careful optimisation of ability cross a boundary and why do we care? A range of ethical arguments will be examined to see which, if any, give us a plausible and defensible line to take on this issue. Held, September 2011.

Treasures of the Sea (126.68 MB)
Wednesday, 15 February 2012
Students and staff from Marine Science, University of Otago discuss their 'treasures of the sea'.

For the Public Good (218.69 MB)
Wednesday, 25 January 2012
2011 O-Zone groups members explain their research and its importance in bite sized presentations.

Winter Lecture Series - 2011: Experience trackers - How science uses mobile technology to understand us (51.50 MB)
Friday, 30 September 2011
Discover the Otago phenomenon for yourself and come along to free public lectures in Auckland and Wellington on a range of relevant and challenging issues that affect so many New Zealanders. Held July-August, 2011.

Winter Lecture Series - 2011: Experience trackers - How science uses mobile technology to understand us (104.38 MB)
Friday, 30 September 2011
Discover the Otago phenomenon for yourself and come along to free public lectures in Auckland and Wellington on a range of relevant and challenging issues that affect so many New Zealanders. Held July-August, 2011.

Patricia Coleman Lecture: Bringing it Home (148.88 MB)
Friday, 12 August 2011
One hundred years ago Lieutenant-Colonel John Studholme not only put up the money to establish a chair of Home Science at the University of Otago, he also wrote the following criteria for the first Professor. Winifred Lily Boys-Smith was the woman who measured up. Dr Noel Waite of the Applied Sciences Department will speaks of Professor Boys-Smith and other people and places that have made the Consumer and Applied Sciences Programme what it is today. Held February 06, 2011.

Patricia Coleman Lecture: Bringing it Home (57.17 MB)
Friday, 12 August 2011
One hundred years ago Lieutenant-Colonel John Studholme not only put up the money to establish a chair of Home Science at the University of Otago, he also wrote the following criteria for the first Professor. Winifred Lily Boys-Smith was the woman who measured up. Dr Noel Waite of the Applied Sciences Department will speaks of Professor Boys-Smith and other people and places that have made the Consumer and Applied Sciences Programme what it is today. Held February 06, 2011.

How many species will survive the 21st century? (64.75 MB)
Friday, 5 August 2011
Peter H. Raven President Emeritus, Missouri Botanical Gardens present the 2011 John Smaillie Tennant Lecture, Botany, Division of Sciences. Held July 21, 2011.

How many species will survive the 21st century? (106.30 MB)
Friday, 5 August 2011
Peter H. Raven President Emeritus, Missouri Botanical Gardens present the 2011 John Smaillie Tennant Lecture, Botany, Division of Sciences. Held July 21, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 5 (35.17 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 4 (12.40 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 5 (14.14 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 1 (66.55 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 3 (49.67 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 1 (27.92 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 2 (47.28 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 6 (5.57 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 3 (19.52 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 4 (17.31 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 6 (12.93 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 2 (27.88 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

IPL: The Remarkable History of Whales and Dolphins (159.34 MB)
Thursday, 16 June 2011
Professor Ewan Fordyce, Department of Geology, Division of Science. Inaugural Professorial Lecture, given on May 19, 2011. Held November 24, 2010.

IPL: The Remarkable History of Whales and Dolphins (63.17 MB)
Thursday, 16 June 2011
Professor Ewan Fordyce, Department of Geology, Division of Science. Inaugural Professorial Lecture, given on May 19, 2011. Held November 24, 2010.

Human-Made Climate Change: A Scientific, Moral and Legal Issue (239.85 MB)
Friday, 27 May 2011
Dr. James Hansen is the director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York, and Adjunct Professor at Columbia University?s Earth Institute. He is best known for bringing the urgency of the climate change issue to the world?s attention when he gave evidence to the US congress in 1988. Jeanette Fitzsimons, prominent NZ environmentalist, says: “Dr. Hansen is one of the best-known climate scientists in the world. He offers a recipe for how to achieve a stable climate that will be particularly relevant to New Zealand.” Held May 18, 2011.

Human-Made Climate Change: A Scientific, Moral and Legal Issue (96.90 MB)
Friday, 27 May 2011
Dr. James Hansen is the director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York, and Adjunct Professor at Columbia University?s Earth Institute. He is best known for bringing the urgency of the climate change issue to the world?s attention when he gave evidence to the US congress in 1988. Jeanette Fitzsimons, prominent NZ environmentalist, says: “Dr. Hansen is one of the best-known climate scientists in the world. He offers a recipe for how to achieve a stable climate that will be particularly relevant to New Zealand.” Held May 18, 2011.

Effective Communication and Relationship Management in the Science-Policy Interface (67.61 MB)
Thursday, 26 May 2011
Nancy Dahl-Tacconi, National Environment Reporting, Australian Government, Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts gives a seminar about the interface between science and policy. Held March, 2011.

Effective Communication and Relationship Management in the Science-Policy Interface (42.77 MB)
Thursday, 26 May 2011
Nancy Dahl-Tacconi, National Environment Reporting, Australian Government, Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts gives a seminar about the interface between science and policy. Held March, 2011.

The crucial role of physical activity in the prevention and management of overweight and obesity (177.07 MB)
Friday, 20 May 2011
Steven Blair is a Professor in the Departments of Exercise Science and Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina. His research focuses on the associations between lifestyle and health, with a specific emphasis on exercise, physical fitness, body composition, and chronic disease. He has published over 400 papers and chapters in the scientific literature, and was the Senior Scientific Editor for the U.S. Surgeon General's Report on Physical Activity and Health. In this presentation, Steven will review the scientific evidence on the role of physical activity in the development of weight gain, overweight, and obesity. He will discuss current recommendations related to amount of activity required to prevent weight gain, to lose weight, and to prevent weight regain. There are numerous misconceptions regarding how much activity is required for these objectives, and these will be discussed. Held February 1, 2010.

The crucial role of physical activity in the prevention and management of overweight and obesity (63.89 MB)
Friday, 20 May 2011
Steven Blair is a Professor in the Departments of Exercise Science and Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina. His research focuses on the associations between lifestyle and health, with a specific emphasis on exercise, physical fitness, body composition, and chronic disease. He has published over 400 papers and chapters in the scientific literature, and was the Senior Scientific Editor for the U.S. Surgeon General's Report on Physical Activity and Health. In this presentation, Steven will review the scientific evidence on the role of physical activity in the development of weight gain, overweight, and obesity. He will discuss current recommendations related to amount of activity required to prevent weight gain, to lose weight, and to prevent weight regain. There are numerous misconceptions regarding how much activity is required for these objectives, and these will be discussed. Held February 1, 2010.

Brain Day 2011: Understanding how the brain can be repaired after a stroke (60.57 MB)
Monday, 9 May 2011
Brain Day 2011 is sponsored by the Neurological Foundation of NZ and the University of Otago. As part of Brain Awareness Week, we join this major international effort to communicate the wonders and achievements of brain research. Dr Graeme Hammond-Tooke, from the Dunedin School of Medicine, speaks on “Stimulating the brain with electricity: From electric rays to magnetic coils” Held March 19, 2011.

Brain Day 2011: Stimulating the brain with electricity - from electric rays to magnetic coils (115.48 MB)
Monday, 9 May 2011
Brain Day 2011 is sponsored by the Neurological Foundation of NZ and the University of Otago. As part of Brain Awareness Week, we join this major international effort to communicate the wonders and achievements of brain research. Dr Andrew Clarkson from the Departments of Psychology and Anatomy & Structural Biology speaks on “Understanding how the brain can be repaired after a stroke” Held March 19, 2011.

Brain Day 2011: Understanding how the brain can be repaired after a stroke (138.48 MB)
Monday, 9 May 2011
Brain Day 2011 is sponsored by the Neurological Foundation of NZ and the University of Otago. As part of Brain Awareness Week, we join this major international effort to communicate the wonders and achievements of brain research. Dr Graeme Hammond-Tooke, from the Dunedin School of Medicine, speaks on “Stimulating the brain with electricity: From electric rays to magnetic coils” Held March 19, 2011.

Special lecture: Sir Fraser Stoddart - "Mingling Art with Science" (90.62 MB)
Monday, 9 May 2011
Sir Fraser Stoddart lecture, delivered as part of the ISMSC-7 conference held at University of Otago in February 2012. The lecture traces sir Fraser's fascination with art forms within science, in particular the usefulness of Borromean rings as the structural framework of nano-particles. The lecture is entitled "Mingling Art with Science" and it was delivered on Wednesday the 1st of February 2012.

Brain Day 2011: Maintaining control over visual orienting - age-related changes and potential remedies (53.66 MB)
Monday, 9 May 2011
Brain Day 2011 is sponsored by the Neurological Foundation of NZ and the University of Otago. As part of Brain Awareness Week, we join this major international effort to communicate the wonders and achievements of brain research. Dr Liana Machado from the Department of Psychology speaks on “Maintaining control over visual orienting: Age related changes and potential remedies” Held March 19, 2011.

Brain Day 2011: Maintaining control over visual orienting - age-related changes and potential remedies (119.66 MB)
Monday, 9 May 2011
Brain Day 2011 is sponsored by the Neurological Foundation of NZ and the University of Otago. As part of Brain Awareness Week, we join this major international effort to communicate the wonders and achievements of brain research. Dr Liana Machado from the Department of Psychology speaks on “Maintaining control over visual orienting: Age related changes and potential remedies” Held March 19, 2011.

Brain Day 2011: Shedding light on Parkinson's Disease (63.42 MB)
Monday, 9 May 2011
Brain Day 2011 is sponsored by the Neurological Foundation of NZ and the University of Otago. As part of Brain Awareness Week, we join this major international effort to communicate the wonders and achievements of brain research. Dr Louise Parr-Brownlie, from the Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, speaks on “Shedding light on Parkinson’s Disease” Held March 19, 2011.

Brain Day 2011: Shedding light on Parkinson's Disease (124.63 MB)
Monday, 9 May 2011
Brain Day 2011 is sponsored by the Neurological Foundation of NZ and the University of Otago. As part of Brain Awareness Week, we join this major international effort to communicate the wonders and achievements of brain research. Dr Louise Parr-Brownlie, from the Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, speaks on “Shedding light on Parkinson’s Disease” Held March 19, 2011.

Brain Day 2011: Stimulating the brain with electricity - from electric rays to magnetic coils (57.06 MB)
Monday, 9 May 2011
Brain Day 2011 is sponsored by the Neurological Foundation of NZ and the University of Otago. As part of Brain Awareness Week, we join this major international effort to communicate the wonders and achievements of brain research. Dr Andrew Clarkson from the Departments of Psychology and Anatomy & Structural Biology speaks on “Understanding how the brain can be repaired after a stroke” Held March 19, 2011.

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IPL: Earthquakes, Quaternary faults, and seismic hazard in New Zealand and beyond (433.84 MB)
Tuesday, 28 March 2017
Professor Professor Mark Stirling's inauguaral lecture: 14 March 2017

IPL David O'Hare - Above Us Only Sky: Human Error, Accidents, and Aviation Safety (159.63 MB)
Tuesday, 27 September 2016
The talk describes David's personal journey as a pilot and psychologist to understand the role of decision making in aviation safety.

IPL - Abby Smith - Sea, Sand, Shells (145.59 MB)
Tuesday, 9 August 2016
Prof Abby Smith has been fascinated by shells and how they are formed since she was a child. She takes us on a journey with her, and we learn that shells have a lot to tell us!

IPL Lisette Burrows "I like the sausage sizzle but it makes me feel gulty" - Shaping the healthy child in obesogenic times. (120.82 MB)
Tuesday, 17 May 2016
Professor Lisette Burrows of the School of Physical Education, Sport and Exercise Sciences gave her Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 19th of April, 2016. She talks about her research into teh demonising or larger body shapes and how effective - or not - the current educational campaigns are in providing balanced information about healthy eating and exercise, and whether in fact there is an obesity epidemic. It was very thought provoking and engaging - have a listen!

IPL Cliff Law "Between the sea and the sky: marine microbes, chemistry and climate" (138.86 MB)
Friday, 13 May 2016
Professor Cliff Law delivered his Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 16th of February. Professor Law holds a joint appointment between Otago and NIWA, exploring the chemical interactions at the interface between the sea and the sky.

IPL David Hutchinson "Curiosity doesn't kill the cat". (229.94 MB)
Thursday, 12 May 2016
Professor David Hutchinson delivered his IPL on the 15th of December, exploring theories of light as wave and particle, explaining that the description of something is not necessarily its reality, and talking about how his theoretical work builds into the exciting research taking place the Dodd-Walls Centre for Photonics and Quantum Technologies.

IPL David Larsen: Therapeutic molecules from sweet sugars and toxic gases (135.81 MB)
Monday, 18 April 2016
Professor David Larsen delivered his IPL on the 17th of November in 2015. He described his work in synthesising organic molecules . This work is in collaboration with biologists primarily, developing therapeutic molecules - PIMs - aimed at reducing asthma, and also looking at molecules designed to slowly release carbon monoxide to support organ transport. This very practical work has required entirely new methodologies and many years' dedication.

John Smaillie Tennant Lecture : David Bowman "Humans and fire in Australian food webs from the Pleistocene to the Anthropocene" (124.78 MB)
Friday, 6 November 2015
Professor David Bowman discusses the complex interactions between fire and food webs, and the part humans have played in manipulating that system; how fire impacts on biodiversity, and how some animal species impact on the severity of landscape fires.

Geoff Baylis Lecture 2009 - Steve Higgins " The Discovery of slowness - life in the plant lane" (137.81 MB)
Wednesday, 4 November 2015
The Geoff Baylis lectures are a joint initiative between the Otago Botanical Society and the Department of Botany, University of Otago. Steve higgins talks about how impressive plants really are - the biggest, tallest, oldest and most dangerous living oprganisms on teh planet. He discusses how grasses evolved and changed the face of the planet, and how leaf phenology can help us map changes in atmosphere and climate. This lecture was given on the 9th of September 2015

Sir Geoffrey Palmer: Climate change in New Zealand - is it doom or can we hope? gases to rotary motors (162.61 MB)
Wednesday, 28 October 2015
Sir Geoffrey Palmer reflects on regulatory efforts to deal with Climate Change, both in New Zealand and internationally. He describes climate change as a slow motion tragedy, and discusses mitigation of the effects of anthropogenic climate change. This lecture was given at University of Otago on Monday 5th of October 2015.

IPL: Nancy Longnecker "Effective Science Communication - a scientific approach (260.07 MB)
Tuesday, 20 October 2015
Professor Nancy Longnecker delivered her Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 15th of September 2015. Nancy's journey from Biologist to communicator to researcher in Sciecne communication has been a fascinating one, and her current work in evaluation of science communication experiences is vital in validating, fine-tuning and and sometimes revolutionising the field.

Leonard Cockayne Lecture - Janice Lord "Flowers in the fridge" (95.96 MB)
Tuesday, 13 October 2015
Janice Lord won this year's Leonard Cockayne prize from the New Zealand Royal Society. This is her commemorative lecture, outlining cutting edge work on the pollination of sub-antarctic plants. There's a number of large, brightly coloured flowering plants in the sub-antactic, which is a sharp contrast with NZ alpine plants with thei predominantly white flowers. Janice explores the reasons for both of these phenomena. The talk was given on the 3rd of September 2015.

IPL: Christina Hulbe "West Antarctic building blocks" (162.63 MB)
Wednesday, 30 September 2015
Professor Christina Hulbe gave her Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 1st of September 2015. She talked about her work on mapping deformations in West Antarctica, and how GPS technology has changed her work. Satellite imagery of meltwater ponds has led to a clearer understanding of the creation of deep crevasses and shattering of icesheets.

Luminescence - The Lightbenders: How black holes influence light (325.88 MB)
Tuesday, 29 September 2015
The Physics Department celebrated the International Year of Light with its luminescence festival. Here is one of the talks, from Jorg Frauendiener. Jorg explains how black holes happen, what they do to light and why.

Luminescence - Peeking and poking at atoms using laser light (315.45 MB)
Monday, 28 September 2015
The Physics Department celebrated the International Year of Light with its luminescence festival. Here is one of the talks, from Niels Kjaergaard who works in the Centre for Quantum Science. Niels talks about manipulating groups of atoms, dividing them, the patterns they make etc.

Luminescence - Discovering other worlds (509.40 MB)
Monday, 28 September 2015
The Physics Department celebrated the International Year of Light with its luminescence festival. Here is one of the talks, from Eyal Schwartz. Eyal talks about discovering other planets and just how hard that can be; the techniques and tools scientists use to track down exo-planets.

IPL: David Bryant "Proofs and Evolution" (222.61 MB)
Wednesday, 16 September 2015
Professor David Bryant delivered his Inaugural Professorial lecture on July 21st 2015. He gave an overview of his work, modelling genetic information to assist with tracing points of origin for plants or animal species.

IPL: Liz Slooten "Whales, dolphins, science and conservation" (150.92 MB)
Monday, 31 August 2015
Professor Liz Slooten delivered her Inaugural Professorial Lecture to a packed theatre on Tuesday 24th of August. The lecture gave an overview of Professor Slooten's work documenting populations of Hector's and Maui dolphones aorund New Zealand's coast as well as tracking and documenting bahaviour of sperm whales and right whalee. Professor Slooten's work highlights the dangers of gill-net fishing and the impact it has on endangered species of marine mammals.

Our Energy and Climate Challenges - Professor Stephen Chu (202.45 MB)
Friday, 26 June 2015
1997 Nobel Laureate Professor Stephen Chu talks about his role as Secretary for energy in the Obama administration, whether peak oil is the real problem, and what will make a difference in the uptake of sustainable energy technologies. This lecture was delivered on December 17th 2014

IPL: Phil Seddon "Re-introduction Biology: restoring species in a changing world" (144.18 MB)
Tuesday, 12 May 2015
Professor Phil Seddon discusses the pros and cons of re-introducing species that have become extinct; the possibilities of reviving populations by translocation; the need to re-aquaint ourselves with the wildlife on our doorstep, in an increasingly urbanised world.

IPL: Steve Wing "Southern ocean ecosystems" (133.93 MB)
Tuesday, 12 May 2015
Professor Steve Wing's research explores the interconnectedness of ocean ecosystems - the physical and chemical processes and how they impact on the food webs, how spatial factors impact on population resilience and so on. This work has been applied with considerable success in the Fiordland area where marine reserves have led to stronger populations across the ecosystem.

IPL: Phil Bishop "The survival of the Earth depends on frogs". (221.96 MB)
Tuesday, 12 May 2015
Professor Phil Bishop talks about his lifelong fascination with amphibians in general and frogs in particular. He discusses the importance of frogs as an indicator species for the wellbeing of our environment, and delivers lessons in acoustic identification - as each species of frog has a unique sound. The inaugural professorial lecture was delivered on May the 5th 2015.

Professor Lyall Hanton - The world of Joseph Mellor (85.93 MB)
Wednesday, 22 April 2015
Professor Lyall Hanton is both HOD Chemistry and the Mellor Professor at University of Otago. In this talk he outlines the amazing life of Joseph Mellor - a man who overcame his circumstances to become one of Otago's brightest stars.

Saturated fat and heart disease: why butter won't melt in my mouth (323.52 MB)
Wednesday, 22 April 2015
Professor Rod Jackson talks about the current debate over saturated fats,and the evidence some writers choose to ignore.He highlights the direct relationship between the drop in saturated fats in our diet and the drop of cardiovascular heart disease.This talk was delivered on the 19th of March.

Baylis Lecture 2014: Dr Peter johnson - "Long leaves and fat roots" (198.41 MB)
Friday, 3 October 2014
The 2014 Baylis lecture was delivers by Dr peter Johnson from Landcare's Dunedin Office. Peter talked about the work of Geoff Baylis who was head of the Botany Department for many years. His lecture looked at the functionality and curiosity of long leaved plants, and those with fat roots also - a wealth of fascinating details, all delivered as part of the Botany Department's 90th anniversary celebrations on the 10th of September

IPCC Report: the latest climate change assessments - what are the implications for our communities? (116.89 MB)
Tuesday, 30 September 2014
Drs Andy Reisinger and Judy Lawrence discuss the latest IPCC report, with a particular focus on the chapters based on Australia and New Zealand. The talk was sponsored by OERC, CSAFE and the Otago Climate Change Network

China's wonder fibres - wild silk, silk cocoon and bamboo (160.16 MB)
Monday, 29 September 2014
Professor Xungai Wang presents a special lecture, made possible by the Confucius Institute. He talks about the special properties of wild silk as well as the claims made about bamboo fibres, and why those claims aren't always as straightforward as they seem.

IPL: Blair Blakie "Ultra-Cool Quantum Physics" (186.13 MB)
Monday, 22 September 2014
Professor Blair Blakie's Inaugural Professorial Lecture was delivered on the 6th of May 2014. Blair talked about ultra-cold atoms, superfluids and superconductors, how useful quantum physics can be to explain other complex and unpredictable systems in nature, and techniques for cooling atoms down to a billionth of a kelvin above absolute zero. Seriously cool...

IPL: Steve Higgins "Assembling a plant ecology" (115.68 MB)
Monday, 22 September 2014
Professor Steve Higgins delivered his Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 3rd of June 2014. Steve talked about the challenges of forecasting ecological developments, due to the many and varied factors that come into play. Humboldt's descriptive empirical work is contrasted with MacArthur's theoretical work, and the usefulness of modeling, in spite of its contingencies and complexities, is outlined.

IPL: Craig Rodger- Zombie Satellites, Killer Electrons and AARDDVARK Radio and Space Physics (169.48 MB)
Monday, 15 September 2014
Professor Craig Rodger delivers his IPL in energetic style - outlining the nature of radiation belts and his research into solar wind, the ionisation of the ozone. The lecture was delivered on the 18th of March

IPL: Jamin Halberstadt "The 'shipping news- adventures with morphs and averages" (190.63 MB)
Monday, 15 September 2014
Professor Halberstadt discusses the way that morphing faces makes them more attractive. he discusses te idea of fluency, or the ease of processing for the brain that makes something more appealing to us, simply because it s easier to figure out. Professor Halberstadt gave his Inaugural Professorial Lecture in the 19th of November 2013

Special Lecture: Don Eigler "Life among the atoms - an expedition to the small frontier." (158.35 MB)
Thursday, 24 July 2014
Don Eigler, winner of the 2010 Kavli prize, talks about hsi work using Scanning Tunnelling Microscopes for surface scanning and atomic manipulation.

The changing height of Aoraki/Mt Cook (173.22 MB)
Thursday, 24 July 2014
Pascal Sirguey form surveying and Nicolas Cullen from Geography talk about their work in measuring the height of Aoraki/Mt Cook after the avalanche that reshaped the mountain.

Inequality, sustaunability and well-being - special lecture by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett (120.71 MB)
Friday, 30 May 2014
Professors Kate Pickett and Richard Wilkinson delivered a special lecture outlining the impact of financial inequality within a society : its impact on a range of health and well-being indicators as well as its impact on sustainability. The lecture was given on the 26th May 2014

Special lecture: Damien Bailey "Oxygen, Evolution an your gas-guzzling brain" (72.15 MB)
Monday, 12 May 2014
Damien Bailey delivered this special lecture while he was a visiting researcher at otago's School of Physical Education, Sports and Exercise Science. The talk was delivered on April 29th 2014

Ted Scambos : Antarctica in the palm of your hand - a science tour of the icesheet (212.36 MB)
Thursday, 27 March 2014
Dr Ted Scambos was at Otago in March of 2014, working wtih Prof Christina Hulbe on a research project funded by the NZ Antartic Research institute. He gave this special lecture outlining the special characteristics of various parts of the icesheet, how their topography had been mapped, and which areas were most susceptible to melting due to shifts in ocean temperature.

OZONE presentation 2013: Lullabies or Lady Gaga? (19.48 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
yu-Chieh Tzeng talks about the importance of controlling Blood pressure variability,to minimise brain injury after stroke. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Unattended moments (31.20 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
Dr Simone Celine Marshall discusses medieval imagery in the Modernist writers' aesthetic. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Inspired by Nature (58.71 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
Bill Hawkins talks about the importance of synthesizing bioactive substances - particularly in developing therapies. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Introduction (30.18 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
Dr Guy Jameson and professor Richard Blaikie introduce the presentations by the Ozone group. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Daring to Dream (35.75 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
Professor Janet Hoek talks about the Aspire 2025 campaign, which aims to make New Zealand smoke-free by 2025 Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Ancient DNA (39.73 MB)
Friday, 21 March 2014
Professor Lisa Matisoo-Smith talks about work on ancient DNA, and the light thrown on migration across East Polynesia.The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Law and Ethics (36.96 MB)
Friday, 21 March 2014
Professor Mark Heneghan talks about working on hte Human Genome project and the ethical questions raised. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

Sex, Drugs and Olympic Gold- Helen Lenskyj (101.11 MB)
Friday, 6 December 2013
Dr Helen Lenskyj was a William Evans Fellow with teh School of physical Education, Sport and Exercise Sciecne in 2013. This public lecture addresses the persistent feminisation of women athletes in olympic sport.

IPL: Rachel Spronken-Smith "Educating undergraduates for an uncertain future" (154.89 MB)
Tuesday, 3 December 2013
Professor Rachel Spronken-Smith's Inaugural Professorial Lecture on 3rd of December 2013. Rachel discusses the value of engaging undergraduate students in research. She explores the graduate attributes that are developed in this way, and other ways of reinforcing this learning, such as reflective and evaluative practice.

Carol Robinson: Finding the right balance - from rare gases to rotary motors (130.71 MB)
Friday, 29 November 2013
Professor Dame Carol Robinson is based at Oxford University. Se has been involved in the field of Mass spectrometry for many years, pioneering work on proteins and complex molecules and trying new things. She talks about her science and her work life balance.

Get off the Grass - Shaun Hendy (125.43 MB)
Tuesday, 26 November 2013
Professor Shaun Hendy gives a tour of the book he wrote with the late Professor Sir Paul Callaghan,looking at the economics of developing a more innovative economy, and the relationship between science and innovation.

Beyond University of Otago: one graduate's story (73.23 MB)
Tuesday, 26 November 2013
Dr AnnMarie Oien completed her PhD in physics at Otago in 1996. after that things got really interesting.... AnnMarie talks about her journey, working in the US. AnnMarie is currently President of the Alumni of University of Otago in Amercia, Inc

Living in a warmer world - Jim Salinger (121.88 MB)
Monday, 25 November 2013
Jim Salinger delivered this summary lecture as part of a tour to promote his book, Living in a Warmer World. The lecture covered the broader topics of human-generated climate change and the specific impacts we could expect in our part of the world. The lecture was given at Otago on the 31st of October

Distinguished Research Medal 2013: Evolution of the Body Snatchers (149.82 MB)
Wednesday, 23 October 2013
Professor Robert Poulin from the Zoology Department, talks about the intricacies of parasitic evolution and behaviour. He delivered this Distinguished Research Medal address on the 23rd of October, 2013

IPL: Anthony Robins - Teaching, learning and the music of memory (136.94 MB)
Tuesday, 17 September 2013
Professor Anthony Robins' Inaugural Public Lecture covered his passions for memory, for teaching and for education in the wider context. He explains how memory works, and the way the brain retrieves information; he discusses his work with robotics clubs in intermediate schools, and his work in developing new programming courses for the secondary school curriculum. 17 September 2013

IPL: Elaine Reese "Tell me a story" (149.12 MB)
Tuesday, 3 September 2013
Professor Elaine Reese delivered her Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 3rd of September 2013. Elaine's research focuses on the importance of rich reminiscing between parent and their children - its importance for the development of language, vocabulary, memory, elf-concept and well-being in children, adolescents and young adults.

In conversation with Alan Mark (288.12 MB)
Wednesday, 7 August 2013
Professor Sir Alan Mark is an eminent conservation botanist and ecologist. Here he is interviewed by Professor Kath Dickinson, outlining his involvement in key points of conservation history in New Zealand, establishing guidelines for lakeshore management, wetland ecology and high country conservation that are still in use today.

IPL: Jonathan Waters "Discovering prehistoric New Zealand" (119.37 MB)
Tuesday, 6 August 2013
Professor Jon Water's Inaugural Professorial Lecture on 6th of August 2013. Jon talks about genetics and how DNA can be used to map extinction and recolonization - for plants as well as animals. He talks about populations of freshwater galaxiids that have been separated by geological events, and about prehistoric sealions and penguins that became extinct with human colonisation, and how new populations have then taken the place of those prehistoric species.

IPL: David Wharton" A world of worms" (109.80 MB)
Tuesday, 23 July 2013
ProfessorDavid Wharton's Inaugural Professorial Lecture on 23rd of July 2013. David talks about the importance of nematodes, and his particular research interests in how nematodes cope with the stress of extreme cold in Antarctica.

IPL: Russell Frew - Stable isotope deltas: using nature's tiny signatures to make connections in food and forensics (170.60 MB)
Tuesday, 2 July 2013
Professor Russell Frew's Inaugural Professorial Lecture on 2nd of July 2013. Russell talks about using stable isotope ratios as "fingerprints" to trace points of origin. This research technique has practical applications in food traceability, biosecurity and forensics. Russell is currently based at the IAEA.

The Future of Sport in Small Nations Symposium: Sport, Culture and the Ministry for Culture and Heritage - Hugh Lawrence (102.97 MB)
Friday, 14 June 2013
The International Symposium on the Future of Sport in Small Nations was held on the 21st November 2012.In this talk hugh Lawrence - senior advisor for Sport and recreation in he Ministry for Culture and Heritage - talks about the intersection between sport and culture, particularly Māori culture.

The Future of Sport in Small Nations Symposium: The Value of Sports Monitor by Fred Coalter (154.46 MB)
Friday, 14 June 2013
The International Symposium on the Future of Sport in Small Nations was held on the 21st November 2012. In this talk Professor Fred Coalter discusses the value of the Sports Monitor in evaluating the impact of sport - particularly in developing countries.

IPL: Ian Jamieson : The art and science of managing threatened species (232.59 MB)
Tuesday, 4 June 2013
Professor Ian Jamieson presents his journey in the study of birds: conservation biology, the role and significance of genetic diversity, and his work in developing management tools for the recovery of threatened species such as the takahe, kokako, kakapo and others. Professor Jamieson's talk was presented on Tuesday the 4th of June 2013.

Science Challenges - Announcement and Next Steps- Sir Peter Gluckman (53.49 MB)
Wednesday, 22 May 2013
Professor Sir Peter Gluckman is Chief Science Advisor in the Office of the Prime Minister's Science and Advisory Committee. He delivered this special lecture at University of Otago, outlining the 10 Science Challenges endorsed by Government and selected by the NZ public. He explains the process of selection, what the challenges mean, and what the next steps will be. This talk was delivered on Friday 3rd of May 2013

IPL: Using science to save dolphins, and whaling without a harpoon (149.73 MB)
Tuesday, 7 May 2013
Professor Steve Dawson's inaugural professorial lecture was delivered on the 7th of May. He spoke about his work on Hector's dolphins, and how this research very quickly became conservation research and the small population numbers became apparent.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - Viruses in the ocean: do they manage the best recycling programme on the planet? (22.51 MB)
Wednesday, 1 May 2013
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. The day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one: Steve Wilhelm explores the role of viruses in the ocean eco-system. Viruses break down bacteria making available many nutrients for the wider eco system.

IPL: Michael Albert "How to shuffle badly" (236.82 MB)
Tuesday, 16 April 2013
Professor Michael Albert explains complex permutation work in terms of card shuffles, good and bad. He demonstrates these kinds of good or bad shuffles, explaining how these deliver good or bad randomisation of a deck of cards. This is Professor Albert's inaugural professorial lecture, delivered on the 16th of April 2013.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - The Metal Isotope Toolbox: Linking Oceans and Climate (38.62 MB)
Monday, 25 March 2013
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. The day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one: Dr Claudine Stirling talks about bio-active metals such as iron, zinc, cadmium and others, and their role in the ocean climate cycle.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - Organic ligands - a key control on trace metal biogeochemistry in the ocean (30.56 MB)
Monday, 25 March 2013
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. The day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one: Dr Sylvia Sander talks about the vital role organic ligands play in the solubility of metals, particularly near geothermal vents. She discusses the importance of bioactive metals in food chains, in carbon, sulfur and nitrogen cycles.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - Adaptations of Southern ocean phytoplankton to iron limitation (116.81 MB)
Monday, 25 March 2013
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. The day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one:Dr Robert Strzepek talks about the way phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean have adapted to the limitations of iron available to them. Iron sources include drifting dust, melting of ice, eddies from coastlines.

IPL: Social Understanding: Development across the human lifespan and in dogs (416.67 MB)
Tuesday, 22 January 2013
Professor Ted Ruffman of the department of Psychology explores the theory of mind, how emotional recognition declines in older adults and the implications of this; and whether dogs are really empathetic. This Inaugural Professorial Lecture was delivered on August 14th 2012

IPL: Jorg Frauendiener: "Sightseeing in Einstein's World" (184.08 MB)
Tuesday, 22 January 2013
Professor Jorg Frauendiener's IPL describes how what we see is affected when the viewer travels at close to the speed of light. There are a number of visual distortions that occur, due to Einstein's special theory of relativity. These include Lorantz' contraction, aberrations that appear to bend straight lines, and the doppler effect which shift the colours seen down the spectrum towards the blue end.

Orokonui Landmark Lecture 2012: Rod Morris-"Seven years with Superman" (557.51 MB)
Wednesday, 19 December 2012
Rod Morris worked with Don Merton for a number of years, pioneering wildlife conservation and island restorations. This lecture celebrataes the life and workof Don Merton, and is entitled "Seven years with Superman". The lecture was given on 19th of September 2012.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - The impact of ocean acidification on New Zealand's temperate reefs (23.43 MB)
Friday, 30 November 2012
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. the day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one: Associate professor Catriona Hurd talking about the role of seaweeds in the health of ocean eco-systems, and the world eco-system - generating oxygen and providing habitat to marine species.

The Future of Sport in Small Nations Symposium: Introduction, and keynote from Barry Houlihan (159.09 MB)
Wednesday, 21 November 2012
The International Symposium on the Future of Sport in Small Nations was held on the 21st November 2012. This talk is the introduction to the symposium, by Steve Jackson and Mike Sam, followed by the keynote address by Professor Barry Houlihan, exploring comparative sport policy analysis.

IPL: Dave Prior - Mapping crystals to underestand gold, glaciers and earthquakes (350.42 MB)
Thursday, 10 May 2012
Inaugural Professorial Lecture from Dave Prior, head of Geology at University of Otago. The lecture was entitled "Mapping crystals to understand gold, glaciers and earthquakes" and was delivered on Thursday the 22nd of September, 2011

IPL: Gary Wilson: Shall we lower the lifeboats? A marine ecological view of warming climates (262.16 MB)
Wednesday, 2 May 2012
Inaugural Professorial Lecture from Gary Wilson, head of Marine Science and researcher in Geology at University of Otago. The lecture was entitled "Shall we lower the lifeboats? A marine ecological view of warming climates." The lecture was delivered on Thursday the 1st of September, 2011

IPL: Ken Hodge : Sports Psychology; its the thought that counts - Video (427.54 MB)
Tuesday, 1 May 2012
Inaugural Professorial Lecture from Ken Hodge of the School of Physical Education. The lecture was entitled "Sports Psychology: It's the thought that counts." The IPL was delivered on Tuesday 17th of April 2012.

Geoff Baylis Lecture 2009 - Video (129.08 MB)
Friday, 27 April 2012
The Geoff Baylis lectures are a joint initiative between the Otago Botanical Society and the Department of Botany, University of Otago. This lecture was presented by Associate Professor Daphne Lee, a paleo-botanist. The title is "Palms, Podocarps, orchids and proteads: the contribution of new fossil plants from Otago and Southland to our understanding of NZ's vegetation history." The lecture was given on the 16th of September 2009.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 5 (136.82 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Disciplinary technologies, Andrew graduated from Queen's University in 1974. Currently Chief of the Division of Prevention and Rehabilitation at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, he is a Professor in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Ottawa. In addition to his clinical responsibilities, Andrew has been extensively involved in sports and sport medicine for many years. Currently he is the President of the Commonwealth Games Association of Canada, has served as a physician at eight Olympic Games and has been the Team Physician for Canada's National Men's Basketball Team since 1978. A member of the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame, Andrew served as Chair of the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport from its inception until 2003. Enhancing Sport Performance: Character, Culture, Coaching or Chemistry? Attempts to enhance sport performance have traditionally reflected an accentuation of skill, a burnishing of sport-specific tactics, and an augmentation of ‘fitness’. A contemporary challenge in sport is to distinguish those enhancement strategies which are seen as in keeping with established norms of sport practice, and those which are viewed as transgressing a standard of ‘appropriate sporting behaviour’. The programmes designed to curb performance-enhancing drug use are intended to address such a challenge. Sport is practiced in accordance with rules and norms that are ultimately arbitrary. Those vested with responsibility for the preservation of ‘fair play’ apply rules that can also be seen as arbitrary – their approaches represent an application, in part, of the “disciplinary technologies” – but which seek to ensure safety, fair-play and enduring public support of sport. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 2 (182.40 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Emerging technologies for performance enhancement, Damian holds a joint appointment within the School of Sport and Exercise Science / ISEAL Victoria University, and the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) where he is responsible for the provision of quality research for both institutions. Damian was appointed as the inaugural AIS Skill Acquisition Specialist (2002) a role dedicated to providing Australian coaches with an evidence-based approach to skill development. Consistent with many other disciplines of sport and exercise science, Skill Acquisition practitioners now have more sophisticated technology at their disposal for both the measurement and development of skilled performance than ever before. Despite claims boasting refined measurement sensitivity, real-time feedback performance, and enhanced interactivity and fidelity, the relative efficacy of such tools is poorly understood. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 1 (157.97 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Technologies of the body, Grant Gillett is a Professor of biomedical ethics at the University of Otago. He is also a neurosurgeon and worked in clinical practice until 2006. He studied medicine at the Auckland Medical School and also completed a Masters degree in Psychology. He became an overseas fellow in Neurosurgery at The Radcliffe Infirmary and then completed a D.Phil at Oxford University and was appointed fellow of Magdalen College in 1985. Cyborgs are human-machine complexes with prosthetic abilities. Where the enhancements remediate a defect we are prepared to acknowledge their value but where they seem to create an unfair advantage over others we feel disturbed. How good can a person be before a compensation for their disability makes them differently abled being in quite another sense. We accept and even welcome enhancement of natural abilities in officials but direct advantaging of competitors is quite another thing. Why – when does good preparation and careful optimisation of ability cross a boundary and why do we care? A range of ethical arguments will be examined to see which, if any, give us a plausible and defensible line to take on this issue. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 6 (158.09 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Disciplinary technologies, Jim is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Canada and Director of the Canadian Athletics Coaching Centre. A sport sociologist and coach educator, his research examines coach effectiveness and the social construction and historical formation of coaches’ practices through a Foucauldian lens. What Coaches Do: Problematizing Planning and Practice “Being a coach” largely revolves around the practice of planning what athletes need to do in training to improve and develop their potential. Three components of training that coaches control, and that greatly influence athletes’ capabilities, are the training spaces used, the monitoring of time, and the organization of exercises. The consideration of these elements, and their impact on athletes’ progression and capacity for performance, derive from Michel Foucault’s analysis of technologies of discipline. In this talk I will examine Foucault’s conceptualization of discipline and it effects on athletes’ bodies, as well as how coaches can enhance their understanding of planning and athlete development by problematizing what they have their athletes do. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 3 (96.58 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Technologies of the body, Gregor was a research scientist at the University of Calgary, Faculty of Medicine, for 16 years before, in 2008, becoming an Assistant Professor at the University of Calgary’s, Program in Community Rehabilitation and Disability Studies. Currently, he is also a part-time Professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa in Canada. In addition, Gregor is a Distinguished Scholar in the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University, USA and Adjunct Faculty in the Critical Disability Studies at York University, Canada; the President of the Canadian Disability Studies Association and Chair of the Bioethics Taskforce of Disabled People's International. Un outil, une machine ce sont des organes, et des organes sont des outils ou des. Machines (1). (Tools and machines are kinds of organs, and organs are kinds of tools or machines; translation from (2)). Science and technology products and changing social concepts and values trigger continuously new sport and influence existing sport in general and the Olympics, Paralympics, and their relationship in particular by among others changing expectations of athletes, officials, spectators, sponsors and governments. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 4 (146.46 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Emerging technologies for performance enhancement, Cathy is a Professor at the School of Psychology, Queen’s University Belfast. Having obtained her Ph.D. from the University of Edinburgh, she went on to take up a post-doc at the Sports Science Faculty, Marseille, France. It was here that she first encountered virtual reality. In a project funded by Adidas she was the first person to use this technology to simulate and understand the perception of curved free-kicks in soccer. Since joining QUB in 2005, she has built an immersive interactive VR lab where she is continuing to use this technology to study decision making in sport. Keynote abstract Virtual Reality Technology: How can it help us understand decision making in sport? Virtual reality provides the perfect adjunct to study perception/action and decision making in sport. It is in essence a sophisticated interactive and immersive human-computer interface where a sensory environment (visual, haptic and/or acoustic) is simulated by a computer and is controlled by the interactive behaviour of the user. It is a versatile methodological tool that gives the experimenter complete control over complex environmental conditions and allows for an in-depth analysis of the user’s behaviour. Held, September 2011.

Treasures of the Sea (126.68 MB)
Wednesday, 15 February 2012
Students and staff from Marine Science, University of Otago discuss their 'treasures of the sea'.

For the Public Good (218.69 MB)
Wednesday, 25 January 2012
2011 O-Zone groups members explain their research and its importance in bite sized presentations.

Winter Lecture Series - 2011: Experience trackers - How science uses mobile technology to understand us (104.38 MB)
Friday, 30 September 2011
Discover the Otago phenomenon for yourself and come along to free public lectures in Auckland and Wellington on a range of relevant and challenging issues that affect so many New Zealanders. Held July-August, 2011.

Patricia Coleman Lecture: Bringing it Home (148.88 MB)
Friday, 12 August 2011
One hundred years ago Lieutenant-Colonel John Studholme not only put up the money to establish a chair of Home Science at the University of Otago, he also wrote the following criteria for the first Professor. Winifred Lily Boys-Smith was the woman who measured up. Dr Noel Waite of the Applied Sciences Department will speaks of Professor Boys-Smith and other people and places that have made the Consumer and Applied Sciences Programme what it is today. Held February 06, 2011.

How many species will survive the 21st century? (106.30 MB)
Friday, 5 August 2011
Peter H. Raven President Emeritus, Missouri Botanical Gardens present the 2011 John Smaillie Tennant Lecture, Botany, Division of Sciences. Held July 21, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 5 (35.17 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 1 (66.55 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 3 (49.67 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 2 (47.28 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 4 (17.31 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 6 (12.93 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

IPL: The Remarkable History of Whales and Dolphins (159.34 MB)
Thursday, 16 June 2011
Professor Ewan Fordyce, Department of Geology, Division of Science. Inaugural Professorial Lecture, given on May 19, 2011. Held November 24, 2010.

Human-Made Climate Change: A Scientific, Moral and Legal Issue (239.85 MB)
Friday, 27 May 2011
Dr. James Hansen is the director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York, and Adjunct Professor at Columbia University?s Earth Institute. He is best known for bringing the urgency of the climate change issue to the world?s attention when he gave evidence to the US congress in 1988. Jeanette Fitzsimons, prominent NZ environmentalist, says: “Dr. Hansen is one of the best-known climate scientists in the world. He offers a recipe for how to achieve a stable climate that will be particularly relevant to New Zealand.” Held May 18, 2011.

Effective Communication and Relationship Management in the Science-Policy Interface (67.61 MB)
Thursday, 26 May 2011
Nancy Dahl-Tacconi, National Environment Reporting, Australian Government, Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts gives a seminar about the interface between science and policy. Held March, 2011.

The crucial role of physical activity in the prevention and management of overweight and obesity (177.07 MB)
Friday, 20 May 2011
Steven Blair is a Professor in the Departments of Exercise Science and Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina. His research focuses on the associations between lifestyle and health, with a specific emphasis on exercise, physical fitness, body composition, and chronic disease. He has published over 400 papers and chapters in the scientific literature, and was the Senior Scientific Editor for the U.S. Surgeon General's Report on Physical Activity and Health. In this presentation, Steven will review the scientific evidence on the role of physical activity in the development of weight gain, overweight, and obesity. He will discuss current recommendations related to amount of activity required to prevent weight gain, to lose weight, and to prevent weight regain. There are numerous misconceptions regarding how much activity is required for these objectives, and these will be discussed. Held February 1, 2010.

Brain Day 2011: Stimulating the brain with electricity - from electric rays to magnetic coils (115.48 MB)
Monday, 9 May 2011
Brain Day 2011 is sponsored by the Neurological Foundation of NZ and the University of Otago. As part of Brain Awareness Week, we join this major international effort to communicate the wonders and achievements of brain research. Dr Andrew Clarkson from the Departments of Psychology and Anatomy & Structural Biology speaks on “Understanding how the brain can be repaired after a stroke” Held March 19, 2011.

Brain Day 2011: Understanding how the brain can be repaired after a stroke (138.48 MB)
Monday, 9 May 2011
Brain Day 2011 is sponsored by the Neurological Foundation of NZ and the University of Otago. As part of Brain Awareness Week, we join this major international effort to communicate the wonders and achievements of brain research. Dr Graeme Hammond-Tooke, from the Dunedin School of Medicine, speaks on “Stimulating the brain with electricity: From electric rays to magnetic coils” Held March 19, 2011.

Brain Day 2011: Maintaining control over visual orienting - age-related changes and potential remedies (119.66 MB)
Monday, 9 May 2011
Brain Day 2011 is sponsored by the Neurological Foundation of NZ and the University of Otago. As part of Brain Awareness Week, we join this major international effort to communicate the wonders and achievements of brain research. Dr Liana Machado from the Department of Psychology speaks on “Maintaining control over visual orienting: Age related changes and potential remedies” Held March 19, 2011.

Brain Day 2011: Shedding light on Parkinson's Disease (124.63 MB)
Monday, 9 May 2011
Brain Day 2011 is sponsored by the Neurological Foundation of NZ and the University of Otago. As part of Brain Awareness Week, we join this major international effort to communicate the wonders and achievements of brain research. Dr Louise Parr-Brownlie, from the Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, speaks on “Shedding light on Parkinson’s Disease” Held March 19, 2011.

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IPL David O'Hare - Above Us Only Sky: Human Error, Accidents, and Aviation Safety (64.51 MB)
Tuesday, 27 September 2016
The talk describes David's personal journey as a pilot and psychologist to understand the role of decision making in aviation safety.

IPL - Abby Smith - Sea, Sand, Shells (55.67 MB)
Tuesday, 9 August 2016
Prof Abby Smith has been fascinated by shells and how they are formed since she was a child. She takes us on a journey with her, and we learn that shells have a lot to tell us!

IPL Lisette Burrows "I like the sausage sizzle but it makes me feel gulty" - Shaping the healthy child in obesogenic times. (73.87 MB)
Tuesday, 17 May 2016
Professor Lisette Burrows of the School of Physical Education, Sport and Exercise Sciences gave her Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 19th of April, 2016. She talks about her research into teh demonising or larger body shapes and how effective - or not - the current educational campaigns are in providing balanced information about healthy eating and exercise, and whether in fact there is an obesity epidemic. It was very thought provoking and engaging - have a listen!

IPL Cliff Law "Between the sea and the sky: marine microbes, chemistry and climate" (67.10 MB)
Friday, 13 May 2016
Professor Cliff Law delivered his Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 16th of February. Professor Law holds a joint appointment between Otago and NIWA, exploring the chemical interactions at the interface between the sea and the sky.

IPL David Hutchinson "Curiosity doesn't kill the cat". (74.49 MB)
Thursday, 12 May 2016
Professor David Hutchinson delivered his IPL on the 15th of December, exploring theories of light as wave and particle, explaining that the description of something is not necessarily its reality, and talking about how his theoretical work builds into the exciting research taking place the Dodd-Walls Centre for Photonics and Quantum Technologies.

IPL David Larsen: Therapeutic molecules from sweet sugars and toxic gases (66.84 MB)
Monday, 18 April 2016
Professor David Larsen delivered his IPL on the 17th of November in 2015. He described his work in synthesising organic molecules . This work is in collaboration with biologists primarily, developing therapeutic molecules - PIMs - aimed at reducing asthma, and also looking at molecules designed to slowly release carbon monoxide to support organ transport. This very practical work has required entirely new methodologies and many years' dedication.

John Smaillie Tennant Lecture : David Bowman "Humans and fire in Australian food webs from the Pleistocene to the Anthropocene" (70.91 MB)
Friday, 6 November 2015
Professor David Bowman discusses the complex interactions between fire and food webs, and the part humans have played in manipulating that system; how fire impacts on biodiversity, and how some animal species impact on the severity of landscape fires.

Geoff Baylis Lecture 2009 - Steve Higgins " The Discovery of slowness - life in the plant lane" (76.92 MB)
Wednesday, 4 November 2015
The Geoff Baylis lectures are a joint initiative between the Otago Botanical Society and the Department of Botany, University of Otago. Steve higgins talks about how impressive plants really are - the biggest, tallest, oldest and most dangerous living oprganisms on teh planet. He discusses how grasses evolved and changed the face of the planet, and how leaf phenology can help us map changes in atmosphere and climate. This lecture was given on the 9th of September 2015

Sir Geoffrey Palmer: Climate change in New Zealand - is it doom or can we hope? gases to rotary motors (51.55 MB)
Wednesday, 28 October 2015
Sir Geoffrey Palmer reflects on regulatory efforts to deal with Climate Change, both in New Zealand and internationally. He describes climate change as a slow motion tragedy, and discusses mitigation of the effects of anthropogenic climate change. This lecture was given at University of Otago on Monday 5th of October 2015.

IPL: Nancy Longnecker "Effective Science Communication - a scientific approach (75.66 MB)
Tuesday, 20 October 2015
Professor Nancy Longnecker delivered her Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 15th of September 2015. Nancy's journey from Biologist to communicator to researcher in Sciecne communication has been a fascinating one, and her current work in evaluation of science communication experiences is vital in validating, fine-tuning and and sometimes revolutionising the field.

Leonard Cockayne Lecture - Janice Lord "Flowers in the fridge" (64.13 MB)
Tuesday, 13 October 2015
Janice Lord won this year's Leonard Cockayne prize from the New Zealand Royal Society. This is her commemorative lecture, outlining cutting edge work on the pollination of sub-antarctic plants. There's a number of large, brightly coloured flowering plants in the sub-antactic, which is a sharp contrast with NZ alpine plants with thei predominantly white flowers. Janice explores the reasons for both of these phenomena. The talk was given on the 3rd of September 2015.

IPL: Christina Hulbe "West Antarctic building blocks" (60.45 MB)
Wednesday, 30 September 2015
Professor Christina Hulbe gave her Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 1st of September 2015. She talked about her work on mapping deformations in West Antarctica, and how GPS technology has changed her work. Satellite imagery of meltwater ponds has led to a clearer understanding of the creation of deep crevasses and shattering of icesheets.

IPL: David Bryant "Proofs and Evolution" (66.38 MB)
Wednesday, 16 September 2015
Professor David Bryant delivered his Inaugural Professorial lecture on July 21st 2015. He gave an overview of his work, modelling genetic information to assist with tracing points of origin for plants or animal species.

IPL: Liz Slooten "Whales, dolphins, science and conservation" (66.09 MB)
Monday, 31 August 2015
Professor Liz Slooten delivered her Inaugural Professorial Lecture to a packed theatre on Tuesday 24th of August. The lecture gave an overview of Professor Slooten's work documenting populations of Hector's and Maui dolphones aorund New Zealand's coast as well as tracking and documenting bahaviour of sperm whales and right whalee. Professor Slooten's work highlights the dangers of gill-net fishing and the impact it has on endangered species of marine mammals.

Our Energy and Climate Challenges - Professor Stephen Chu (79.98 MB)
Friday, 26 June 2015
1997 Nobel Laureate Professor Stephen Chu talks about his role as Secretary for energy in the Obama administration, whether peak oil is the real problem, and what will make a difference in the uptake of sustainable energy technologies. This lecture was delivered on December 17th 2014

IPL: Phil Seddon "Re-introduction Biology: restoring species in a changing world" (58.16 MB)
Tuesday, 12 May 2015
Professor Phil Seddon discusses the pros and cons of re-introducing species that have become extinct; the possibilities of reviving populations by translocation; the need to re-aquaint ourselves with the wildlife on our doorstep, in an increasingly urbanised world.

IPL: Steve Wing "Southern ocean ecosystems" (58.45 MB)
Tuesday, 12 May 2015
Professor Steve Wing's research explores the interconnectedness of ocean ecosystems - the physical and chemical processes and how they impact on the food webs, how spatial factors impact on population resilience and so on. This work has been applied with considerable success in the Fiordland area where marine reserves have led to stronger populations across the ecosystem.

IPL: Phil Bishop "The survival of the Earth depends on frogs". (92.35 MB)
Tuesday, 12 May 2015
Professor Phil Bishop talks about his lifelong fascination with amphibians in general and frogs in particular. He discusses the importance of frogs as an indicator species for the wellbeing of our environment, and delivers lessons in acoustic identification - as each species of frog has a unique sound. The inaugural professorial lecture was delivered on May the 5th 2015.

Saturated fat and heart disease: why butter won't melt in my mouth (64.19 MB)
Wednesday, 22 April 2015
Professor Rod Jackson talks about the current debate over saturated fats,and the evidence some writers choose to ignore.He highlights the direct relationship between the drop in saturated fats in our diet and the drop of cardiovascular heart disease.This talk was delivered on the 19th of March.

Professor Lyall Hanton - The world of Joseph Mellor (55.17 MB)
Wednesday, 22 April 2015
Professor Lyall Hanton is both HOD Chemistry and the Mellor Professor at University of Otago. In this talk he outlines the amazing life of Joseph Mellor - a man who overcame his circumstances to become one of Otago's brightest stars.

Baylis Lecture 2014: Dr Peter johnson - "Long leaves and fat roots" (86.88 MB)
Friday, 3 October 2014
The 2014 Baylis lecture was delivers by Dr peter Johnson from Landcare's Dunedin Office. Peter talked about the work of Geoff Baylis who was head of the Botany Department for many years. His lecture looked at the functionality and curiosity of long leaved plants, and those with fat roots also - a wealth of fascinating details, all delivered as part of the Botany Department's 90th anniversary celebrations on the 10th of September

IPCC Report: the latest climate change assessments - what are the implications for our communities? (62.11 MB)
Tuesday, 30 September 2014
Drs Andy Reisinger and Judy Lawrence discuss the latest IPCC report, with a particular focus on the chapters based on Australia and New Zealand. The talk was sponsored by OERC, CSAFE and the Otago Climate Change Network

China's wonder fibres - wild silk, silk cocoon and bamboo (59.26 MB)
Monday, 29 September 2014
Professor Xungai Wang presents a special lecture, made possible by the Confucius Institute. He talks about the special properties of wild silk as well as the claims made about bamboo fibres, and why those claims aren't always as straightforward as they seem.

IPL: Steve Higgins "Assembling a plant ecology" (56.86 MB)
Monday, 22 September 2014
Professor Steve Higgins delivered his Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 3rd of June 2014. Steve talked about the challenges of forecasting ecological developments, due to the many and varied factors that come into play. Humboldt's descriptive empirical work is contrasted with MacArthur's theoretical work, and the usefulness of modeling, in spite of its contingencies and complexities, is outlined.

IPL: Blair Blakie "Ultra-Cool Quantum Physics" (70.66 MB)
Monday, 22 September 2014
Professor Blair Blakie's Inaugural Professorial Lecture was delivered on the 6th of May 2014. Blair talked about ultra-cold atoms, superfluids and superconductors, how useful quantum physics can be to explain other complex and unpredictable systems in nature, and techniques for cooling atoms down to a billionth of a kelvin above absolute zero. Seriously cool...

IPL: Jamin Halberstadt "The 'shipping news- adventures with morphs and averages" (68.00 MB)
Monday, 15 September 2014
Professor Halberstadt discusses the way that morphing faces makes them more attractive. he discusses te idea of fluency, or the ease of processing for the brain that makes something more appealing to us, simply because it s easier to figure out. Professor Halberstadt gave his Inaugural Professorial Lecture in the 19th of November 2013

IPL: Craig Rodger- Zombie Satellites, Killer Electrons and AARDDVARK Radio and Space Physics (63.89 MB)
Monday, 15 September 2014
Professor Craig Rodger delivers his IPL in energetic style - outlining the nature of radiation belts and his research into solar wind, the ionisation of the ozone. The lecture was delivered on the 18th of March

Special Lecture: Don Eigler "Life among the atoms - an expedition to the small frontier." (58.12 MB)
Thursday, 24 July 2014
Don Eigler, winner of the 2010 Kavli prize, talks about hsi work using Scanning Tunnelling Microscopes for surface scanning and atomic manipulation.

The changing height of Aoraki/Mt Cook (54.03 MB)
Thursday, 24 July 2014
Pascal Sirguey form surveying and Nicolas Cullen from Geography talk about their work in measuring the height of Aoraki/Mt Cook after the avalanche that reshaped the mountain.

Inequality, sustaunability and well-being - special lecture by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett (63.42 MB)
Friday, 30 May 2014
Professors Kate Pickett and Richard Wilkinson delivered a special lecture outlining the impact of financial inequality within a society : its impact on a range of health and well-being indicators as well as its impact on sustainability. The lecture was given on the 26th May 2014

Special lecture: Damien Bailey "Oxygen, Evolution an your gas-guzzling brain" (49.24 MB)
Monday, 12 May 2014
Damien Bailey delivered this special lecture while he was a visiting researcher at otago's School of Physical Education, Sports and Exercise Science. The talk was delivered on April 29th 2014

Ted Scambos : Antarctica in the palm of your hand - a science tour of the icesheet (70.74 MB)
Thursday, 27 March 2014
Dr Ted Scambos was at Otago in March of 2014, working wtih Prof Christina Hulbe on a research project funded by the NZ Antartic Research institute. He gave this special lecture outlining the special characteristics of various parts of the icesheet, how their topography had been mapped, and which areas were most susceptible to melting due to shifts in ocean temperature.

OZONE presentation 2013: Daring to Dream (17.60 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
Professor Janet Hoek talks about the Aspire 2025 campaign, which aims to make New Zealand smoke-free by 2025 Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Lullabies or Lady Gaga? (9.01 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
Yu-Chieh Tzeng talks about the importance of controlling Blood pressure variability,to minimise brain injury after stroke. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Unattended moments (11.74 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
Dr Simone Celine Marshall discusses medieval imagery in the Modernist writers' aesthetic. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Inspired by Nature (16.43 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
Bill Hawkins talks about the importance of synthesizing bioactive substances - particularly in developing therapies. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Introduction (9.64 MB)
Monday, 24 March 2014
Dr Guy Jameson and professor Richard Blaikie introduce the presentations by the Ozone group. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Ancient DNA (18.14 MB)
Friday, 21 March 2014
Professor Lisa Matisoo-Smith talks about work on ancient DNA, and the light thrown on migration across East Polynesia.The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

OZONE presentation 2013: Law and Ethics (13.87 MB)
Friday, 21 March 2014
Professor Mark Heneghan talks about working on hte Human Genome project and the ethical questions raised. The Ozone presentations took place September 2013, in St David's theatre

Sex, Drugs and Olympic Gold- Helen Lenskyj (38.65 MB)
Friday, 6 December 2013
Dr Helen Lenskyj was a William Evans Fellow with teh School of physical Education, Sport and Exercise Sciecne in 2013. This public lecture addresses the persistent feminisation of women athletes in olympic sport.

Get off the Grass - Shaun Hendy (70.11 MB)
Friday, 6 December 2013
Professor Shaun Hendy gives a tour of the book he wrote with the late Professor Sir Paul Callaghan,looking at the economics of developing a more innovative economy, and the relationship between science and innovation.

IPL: Rachel Spronken-Smith "Educating undergraduates for an uncertain future" (63.34 MB)
Tuesday, 3 December 2013
Professor Rachel Spronken-Smith's Inaugural Professorial Lecture on 3rd of December 2013. Rachel discusses the value of engaging undergraduate students in research. She explores the graduate attributes that are developed in this way, and other ways of reinforcing this learning, such as reflective and evaluative practice.

Carol Robinson: Finding the right balance - from rare gases to rotary motors (56.62 MB)
Friday, 29 November 2013
Professor Dame Carol Robinson is based at Oxford University. Se has been involved in the field of Mass spectrometry for many years, pioneering work on proteins and complex molecules and trying new things. She talks about her science and her work life balance.

Beyond University of Otago: one graduate's story (28.32 MB)
Tuesday, 26 November 2013
Dr AnnMarie Oien completed her PhD in physics at Otago in 1996. after that things got really interesting.... AnnMarie talks about her journey, working in the US. AnnMarie is currently President of the Alumni of University of Otago in Amercia, Inc

Living in a warmer world - Jim Salinger (61.81 MB)
Monday, 25 November 2013
Jim Salinger delivered this summary lecture as part of a tour to promote his book, Living in a Warmer World. The lecture covered the broader topics of human-generated climate change and the specific impacts we could expect in our part of the world. The lecture was given at Otago on the 31st of October

Distinguished Research Medal 2013: Evolution of the Body Snatchers (70.67 MB)
Wednesday, 23 October 2013
Professor Robert Poulin from the Zoology Department, talks about the intricacies of parasitic evolution and behaviour. He delivered this Distinguished Research Medal address on the 23rd of October, 2013

IPL: Anthony Robins - Teaching, learning and the music of memory (60.38 MB)
Tuesday, 17 September 2013
Professor Anthony Robins' Inaugural Public Lecture covered his passions for memory, for teaching and for education in the wider context. He explains how memory works, and the way the brain retrieves information; he discusses his work with robotics clubs in intermediate schools, and his work in developing new programming courses for the secondary school curriculum. 17 September 2013

IPL: Elaine Reese "Tell me a story" (57.80 MB)
Tuesday, 3 September 2013
Professor Elaine Reese delivered her Inaugural Professorial Lecture on the 3rd of September 2013. Elaine's research focuses on the importance of rich reminiscing between parent and their children - its importance for the development of language, vocabulary, memory, elf-concept and well-being in children, adolescents and young adults.

In conversation with Alan Mark (81.22 MB)
Wednesday, 7 August 2013
Professor Sir Alan Mark is an eminent conservation botanist and ecologist. Here he is interviewed by Professor Kath Dickinson, outlining his involvement in key points of conservation history in New Zealand, establishing guidelines for lakeshore management, wetland ecology and high country conservation that are still in use today.

IPL: Jonathan Waters "Discovering prehistoric New Zealand" (57.47 MB)
Tuesday, 6 August 2013
Professor Jon Water's Inaugural Professorial Lecture on 6th of August 2013. Jon talks about genetics and how DNA can be used to map extinction and recolonization - for plants as well as animals. He talks about populations of freshwater galaxiids that have been separated by geological events, and about prehistoric sealions and penguins that became extinct with human colonisation, and how new populations have then taken the place of those prehistoric species.

IPL: David Wharton" A world of worms" (49.25 MB)
Tuesday, 23 July 2013
ProfessorDavid Wharton's Inaugural Professorial Lecture on 23rd of July 2013. David talks about the importance of nematodes, and his particular research interests in how nematodes cope with the stress of extreme cold in Antarctica.

IPL: Russell Frew - Stable isotope deltas: using nature's tiny signatures to make connections in food and forensics (63.40 MB)
Tuesday, 2 July 2013
Professor Russell Frew's Inaugural Professorial Lecture on 2nd of July 2013. Russell talks about using stable isotope ratios as "fingerprints" to trace points of origin. This research technique has practical applications in food traceability, biosecurity and forensics. Russell is currently based at the IAEA.

The Future of Sport in Small Nations Symposium: Sport, Culture and the Ministry for Culture and Heritage - Hugh Lawrence (39.48 MB)
Friday, 14 June 2013
The International Symposium on the Future of Sport in Small Nations was held on the 21st November 2012.In this talk hugh Lawrence - senior advisor for Sport and recreation in he Ministry for Culture and Heritage - talks about the intersection between sport and culture, particularly Māori culture.

The Future of Sport in Small Nations Symposium: The Value of Sports Monitor by Fred Coalter (64.26 MB)
Friday, 14 June 2013
The International Symposium on the Future of Sport in Small Nations was held on the 21st November 2012. In this talk Professor Fred Coalter discusses the value of the Sports Monitor in evaluating the impact of sport - particularly in developing countries.

The Future of Sport in Small Nations Symposium: Introduction, and keynote from Barry Houlihan (84.24 MB)
Friday, 14 June 2013
The International Symposium on the Future of Sport in Small Nations was held on the 21st November 2012. This talk is the introduction to the symposium, by Steve Jackson and Mike Sam, followed by the keynote address by Professor Barry Houlihan, exploring comparative sport policy analysis.

IPL: Ian Jamieson : The art and science of managing threatened species (74.69 MB)
Tuesday, 4 June 2013
Professor Ian Jamieson presents his journey in the study of birds: conservation biology, the role and significance of genetic diversity, and his work in developing management tools for the recovery of threatened species such as the takahe, kokako, kakapo and others. Professor Jamieson's talk was presented on Tuesday the 4th of June 2013.

Science Challenges - Announcement and Next Steps- Sir Peter Gluckman (27.30 MB)
Wednesday, 22 May 2013
Professor Sir Peter Gluckman is Chief Science Advisor in the Office of the Prime Minister's Science and Advisory Committee. He delivered this special lecture at University of Otago, outlining the 10 Science Challenges endorsed by Government and selected by the NZ public. He explains the process of selection, what the challenges mean, and what the next steps will be. This talk was delivered on Friday 3rd of May 2013

IPL: Using science to save dolphins, and whaling without a harpoon (61.69 MB)
Tuesday, 7 May 2013
Professor Steve Dawson's inaugural professorial lecture was delivered on the 7th of May. He spoke about his work on Hector's dolphins, and how this research very quickly became conservation research and the small population numbers became apparent.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - Viruses in the ocean: do they manage the best recycling programme on the planet? (15.08 MB)
Wednesday, 1 May 2013
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. The day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one: Steve Wilhelm explores the role of viruses in the ocean eco-system. Viruses break down bacteria making available many nutrients for the wider eco system.

IPL: Michael Albert "How to shuffle badly" (66.59 MB)
Tuesday, 16 April 2013
Professor Michael Albert explains complex permutation work in terms of card shuffles, good and bad. He demonstrates these kinds of good or bad shuffles, explaining how these deliver good or bad randomisation of a deck of cards. This is Professor Albert's inaugural professorial lecture, delivered on the 16th of April 2013.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - Climate change affects on invertebrate larvae - an example in the sea urchin centrostephanus rodgersii (18.74 MB)
Friday, 12 April 2013
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. The day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one: Dr Miles Lamare talks about how changes in climate have affected the range of Sea urchin larvae - where they live and the impact they have on eco-systems.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - The Metal Isotope Toolbox: Linking Oceans and Climate (21.24 MB)
Monday, 25 March 2013
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. The day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one: Dr Claudine Stirling talks about bio-active metals such as iron, zinc, cadmium and others, and their role in the ocean climate cycle.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - Adaptations of Southern ocean phytoplankton to iron limitation (22.49 MB)
Monday, 25 March 2013
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. The day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one:Dr Robert Strzepek talks about the way phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean have adapted to the limitations of iron available to them. Iron sources include drifting dust, melting of ice, eddies from coastlines.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - Organic ligands - a key control on trace metal biogeochemistry in the ocean (16.98 MB)
Monday, 25 March 2013
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. The day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one: Dr Sylvia Sander talks about the vital role organic ligands play in the solubility of metals, particularly near geothermal vents. She discusses the importance of bioactive metals in food chains, in carbon, sulfur and nitrogen cycles.

CSAFE seminar: Dave McKay - Education for Survival, Resilience and Continuance: Mātauranga Taiao, Māori and Indigeneity (69.95 MB)
Tuesday, 26 February 2013
PhD candidate Dave McKay talks about the lessons to be learned from Mātauranga Taiao - a complex interwoven net of connections between people, their environment and each other. This seminar was presented at CSAFE on the 29th of November 2012

"A new global climate change treaty - can humanity deliver?" (102.56 MB)
Monday, 25 February 2013
A New Global Climate Change Treaty - Can humanity deliver? Our challenge after Durban for 2015. This special lecture was delivered by Professor Jonathan Boston, School of Government Victoria University. He was hosted by CSAFE, the Centre for Science Communication, the Centre for theology and Public Issues and Generation Zero. The lecture addresses ploicy developments in relation to the new global climate change treaty proposed - the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action. The lecture was held on March 14 2012 and is followed by a panel discussion.

John Smaillie Tennant Lecture : Lesley Hughes"Climate change in Australasia: Challenges, Risks and Gaps" (63.02 MB)
Tuesday, 22 January 2013
Professor Lesley Hughes talks about the latest global and Australasian trends in observed and projected climate change, and identifies the key risks these changes pose for Australia & New Zealand. The similarities and contrasts between how Australian and New Zealand scientists and policy makers are approaching potential future challenges will also be discussed and important research gaps highlighted.Lecture given 18th September 2012

IPL: Social Understanding: Development across the human lifespan and in dogs (68.07 MB)
Tuesday, 22 January 2013
Professor Ted Ruffman of the department of Psychology explores the theory of mind, how emotional recognition declines in older adults and the implications of this; and whether dogs are really empathetic. This Inaugural Professorial Lecture was delivered on August 14th 2012

Orokonui Landmark Lecture 2012: Rod Morris-"Seven years with Superman" (97.66 MB)
Wednesday, 19 December 2012
Rod Morris worked with Don Merton for a number of years, pioneering wildlife conservation and island restorations. This lecture celebrates the life and work of Don Merton, and is entitled "Seven years with Superman". The lecture was given on 19th of September 2012.

Ocean Acidification Symposium - The impact of ocean acidification on New Zealand's temperate reefs (15.83 MB)
Friday, 30 November 2012
The Ocean Acidification Symposium was presented by the Centre for Chemical and Physical Oceanography, in November of 2012. the day-long symposium featured brief presentations from a wide range of researchers, of which this is one: Associate professor Catriona Hurd talking about the role of seaweeds in the health of ocean eco-systems, and the world eco-system - generating oxygen and providing habitat to marine species.

IPL: Dave Prior - Mapping crystals to underestand gold, glaciers and earthquakes (60.53 MB)
Thursday, 10 May 2012
Inaugural Professorial Lecture from Dave Prior, head of Geology at University of Otago. The lecture was entitled "Mapping crystals to understand gold, glaciers and earthquakes" and was delivered on Thursday the 22nd of September, 2011

IPL: Doug Booth - From politics to pleasure: professing a philosophy of Physical Education (73.96 MB)
Thursday, 10 May 2012
Inaugural Professorial Lecture from Doug Booth, Dean of the School of Physical Education at University of Otago. Prof Booth talked about the de-pleasuring of physical activity and the need to consider both social and biological components in exploring the intrinsic benefits of physical activity. The lecture was entitled "From politics to pleasure : professing a philosophy of Physical Education" and was delivered on Wednesday the 12th of November, 2008.

IPL: Gary Wilson: Shall we lower the lifeboats? A marine ecological view of warming climates - Audio (49.82 MB)
Wednesday, 2 May 2012
Inaugural Professorial Lecture from Gary Wilson, head of Marine Science and researcher in Geology at University of Otago. The lecture was entitled "Shall we lower the lifeboats? A marine ecological view of warming climates." The lecture was delivered on Thursday the 1st of September, 2011

IPL: Ken Hodge : Sports Psychology: its the thought that counts - Audio (72.12 MB)
Tuesday, 1 May 2012
Inaugural Professorial Lecture from Ken Hodge of the School of Physical Education. The lecture was entitled "Sports Psychology: It's the thought that counts." The IPL was delivered on Tuesday 17th of April 2012.

Geoff Baylis Lecture 2009 (69.03 MB)
Friday, 27 April 2012
The Geoff Baylis lectures are a joint initiative between the Otago Botanical Society and the Department of Botany, University of Otago. This lecture was presented by Associate Professor Daphne Lee, a paleo-botanist. The title is "Palms, Podocarps, orchids and proteads: the contribution of new fossil plants from Otago and Southland to our understanding of NZ's vegetation history." The lecture was given on the 16th of September 2009.

Setting priorities for science - special lecture by Sir Peter Gluckman (58.78 MB)
Friday, 27 April 2012
Professor Sir Peter Gluckman is Chief Science Advisor in the Office of the Prime Minister's Science and Advisory Committee. He delivered this special lecture at University of Otago, outlining priorities for science in New Zealand and in a broader context. The lecture is entitled " setting Priorities for Science" and it was delivered on Tuesday 24th April 2012.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 3 (67.07 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Technologies of the body, Gregor was a research scientist at the University of Calgary, Faculty of Medicine, for 16 years before, in 2008, becoming an Assistant Professor at the University of Calgary’s, Program in Community Rehabilitation and Disability Studies. Currently, he is also a part-time Professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa in Canada. In addition, Gregor is a Distinguished Scholar in the Center for Nanotechnology in Society at Arizona State University, USA and Adjunct Faculty in the Critical Disability Studies at York University, Canada; the President of the Canadian Disability Studies Association and Chair of the Bioethics Taskforce of Disabled People's International. Un outil, une machine ce sont des organes, et des organes sont des outils ou des. Machines (1). (Tools and machines are kinds of organs, and organs are kinds of tools or machines; translation from (2)). Science and technology products and changing social concepts and values trigger continuously new sport and influence existing sport in general and the Olympics, Paralympics, and their relationship in particular by among others changing expectations of athletes, officials, spectators, sponsors and governments. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 2 (67.66 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Emerging technologies for performance enhancement, Damian holds a joint appointment within the School of Sport and Exercise Science / ISEAL Victoria University, and the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) where he is responsible for the provision of quality research for both institutions. Damian was appointed as the inaugural AIS Skill Acquisition Specialist (2002) a role dedicated to providing Australian coaches with an evidence-based approach to skill development. Consistent with many other disciplines of sport and exercise science, Skill Acquisition practitioners now have more sophisticated technology at their disposal for both the measurement and development of skilled performance than ever before. Despite claims boasting refined measurement sensitivity, real-time feedback performance, and enhanced interactivity and fidelity, the relative efficacy of such tools is poorly understood. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 5 (77.58 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Disciplinary technologies, Andrew graduated from Queen's University in 1974. Currently Chief of the Division of Prevention and Rehabilitation at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, he is a Professor in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Ottawa. In addition to his clinical responsibilities, Andrew has been extensively involved in sports and sport medicine for many years. Currently he is the President of the Commonwealth Games Association of Canada, has served as a physician at eight Olympic Games and has been the Team Physician for Canada's National Men's Basketball Team since 1978. A member of the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame, Andrew served as Chair of the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport from its inception until 2003. Enhancing Sport Performance: Character, Culture, Coaching or Chemistry? Attempts to enhance sport performance have traditionally reflected an accentuation of skill, a burnishing of sport-specific tactics, and an augmentation of ‘fitness’. A contemporary challenge in sport is to distinguish those enhancement strategies which are seen as in keeping with established norms of sport practice, and those which are viewed as transgressing a standard of ‘appropriate sporting behaviour’. The programmes designed to curb performance-enhancing drug use are intended to address such a challenge. Sport is practiced in accordance with rules and norms that are ultimately arbitrary. Those vested with responsibility for the preservation of ‘fair play’ apply rules that can also be seen as arbitrary – their approaches represent an application, in part, of the “disciplinary technologies” – but which seek to ensure safety, fair-play and enduring public support of sport. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 6 (71.29 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Disciplinary technologies, Jim is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Canada and Director of the Canadian Athletics Coaching Centre. A sport sociologist and coach educator, his research examines coach effectiveness and the social construction and historical formation of coaches’ practices through a Foucauldian lens. What Coaches Do: Problematizing Planning and Practice “Being a coach” largely revolves around the practice of planning what athletes need to do in training to improve and develop their potential. Three components of training that coaches control, and that greatly influence athletes’ capabilities, are the training spaces used, the monitoring of time, and the organization of exercises. The consideration of these elements, and their impact on athletes’ progression and capacity for performance, derive from Michel Foucault’s analysis of technologies of discipline. In this talk I will examine Foucault’s conceptualization of discipline and it effects on athletes’ bodies, as well as how coaches can enhance their understanding of planning and athlete development by problematizing what they have their athletes do. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 4 (69.30 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Emerging technologies for performance enhancement, Cathy is a Professor at the School of Psychology, Queen’s University Belfast. Having obtained her Ph.D. from the University of Edinburgh, she went on to take up a post-doc at the Sports Science Faculty, Marseille, France. It was here that she first encountered virtual reality. In a project funded by Adidas she was the first person to use this technology to simulate and understand the perception of curved free-kicks in soccer. Since joining QUB in 2005, she has built an immersive interactive VR lab where she is continuing to use this technology to study decision making in sport. Keynote abstract Virtual Reality Technology: How can it help us understand decision making in sport? Virtual reality provides the perfect adjunct to study perception/action and decision making in sport. It is in essence a sophisticated interactive and immersive human-computer interface where a sensory environment (visual, haptic and/or acoustic) is simulated by a computer and is controlled by the interactive behaviour of the user. It is a versatile methodological tool that gives the experimenter complete control over complex environmental conditions and allows for an in-depth analysis of the user’s behaviour. Held, September 2011.

Technologies in Sport Symposium - Session 1 (75.40 MB)
Friday, 30 March 2012
Technologies of the body, Grant Gillett is a Professor of biomedical ethics at the University of Otago. He is also a neurosurgeon and worked in clinical practice until 2006. He studied medicine at the Auckland Medical School and also completed a Masters degree in Psychology. He became an overseas fellow in Neurosurgery at The Radcliffe Infirmary and then completed a D.Phil at Oxford University and was appointed fellow of Magdalen College in 1985. Cyborgs are human-machine complexes with prosthetic abilities. Where the enhancements remediate a defect we are prepared to acknowledge their value but where they seem to create an unfair advantage over others we feel disturbed. How good can a person be before a compensation for their disability makes them differently abled being in quite another sense. We accept and even welcome enhancement of natural abilities in officials but direct advantaging of competitors is quite another thing. Why – when does good preparation and careful optimisation of ability cross a boundary and why do we care? A range of ethical arguments will be examined to see which, if any, give us a plausible and defensible line to take on this issue. Held, September 2011.

Winter Lecture Series - 2011: Experience trackers - How science uses mobile technology to understand us (51.50 MB)
Friday, 30 September 2011
Discover the Otago phenomenon for yourself and come along to free public lectures in Auckland and Wellington on a range of relevant and challenging issues that affect so many New Zealanders. Held July-August, 2011.

Patricia Coleman Lecture: Bringing it Home (57.17 MB)
Friday, 12 August 2011
One hundred years ago Lieutenant-Colonel John Studholme not only put up the money to establish a chair of Home Science at the University of Otago, he also wrote the following criteria for the first Professor. Winifred Lily Boys-Smith was the woman who measured up. Dr Noel Waite of the Applied Sciences Department will speaks of Professor Boys-Smith and other people and places that have made the Consumer and Applied Sciences Programme what it is today. Held February 06, 2011.

How many species will survive the 21st century? (64.75 MB)
Friday, 5 August 2011
Peter H. Raven President Emeritus, Missouri Botanical Gardens present the 2011 John Smaillie Tennant Lecture, Botany, Division of Sciences. Held July 21, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 4 (12.40 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 5 (14.14 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 1 (27.92 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 6 (5.57 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 3 (19.52 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

Sink or Swim: Sea Level Rise - Implications for Dunedin. Session 2 (27.88 MB)
Thursday, 21 July 2011
An information evening open to the public to discuss issues around sea level rise and how it might affect low lying suburbs and coastal communities in the Dunedin area. Learn what the DCC and ORC are planning as well as hearing about possible engineering solutions and the social aspects of sea level rise. It is being chaired by Professor John Hannah, member of the F.I.G. Task Force on Climate Change. Hosted by the NZ Institute of Surveyors. Held July 12, 2011.

IPL: The Remarkable History of Whales and Dolphins (63.17 MB)
Thursday, 16 June 2011
Professor Ewan Fordyce, Department of Geology, Division of Science. Inaugural Professorial Lecture, given on May 19, 2011. Held November 24, 2010.

Human-Made Climate Change: A Scientific, Moral and Legal Issue (96.90 MB)
Friday, 27 May 2011
Dr. James Hansen is the director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York, and Adjunct Professor at Columbia University?s Earth Institute. He is best known for bringing the urgency of the climate change issue to the world?s attention when he gave evidence to the US congress in 1988. Jeanette Fitzsimons, prominent NZ environmentalist, says: “Dr. Hansen is one of the best-known climate scientists in the world. He offers a recipe for how to achieve a stable climate that will be particularly relevant to New Zealand.” Held May 18, 2011.

Effective Communication and Relationship Management in the Science-Policy Interface (42.77 MB)
Thursday, 26 May 2011
Nancy Dahl-Tacconi, National Environment Reporting, Australian Government, Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts gives a seminar about the interface between science and policy. Held March, 2011.

The crucial role of physical activity in the prevention and management of overweight and obesity (63.89 MB)
Friday, 20 May 2011
Steven Blair is a Professor in the Departments of Exercise Science and Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina. His research focuses on the associations between lifestyle and health, with a specific emphasis on exercise, physical fitness, body composition, and chronic disease. He has published over 400 papers and chapters in the scientific literature, and was the Senior Scientific Editor for the U.S. Surgeon General's Report on Physical Activity and Health. In this presentation, Steven will review the scientific evidence on the role of physical activity in the development of weight gain, overweight, and obesity. He will discuss current recommendations related to amount of activity required to prevent weight gain, to lose weight, and to prevent weight regain. There are numerous misconceptions regarding how much activity is required for these objectives, and these will be discussed. Held February 1, 2010.

Brain Day 2011: Understanding how the brain can be repaired after a stroke (60.57 MB)
Monday, 9 May 2011
Brain Day 2011 is sponsored by the Neurological Foundation of NZ and the University of Otago. As part of Brain Awareness Week, we join this major international effort to communicate the wonders and achievements of brain research. Dr Graeme Hammond-Tooke, from the Dunedin School of Medicine, speaks on “Stimulating the brain with electricity: From electric rays to magnetic coils” Held March 19, 2011.

Special lecture: Sir Fraser Stoddart - "Mingling Art with Science" (90.62 MB)
Monday, 9 May 2011
Sir Fraser Stoddart lecture, delivered as part of the ISMSC-7 conference held at University of Otago in February 2012. The lecture traces sir Fraser's fascination with art forms within science, in particular the usefulness of Borromean rings as the structural framework of nano-particles. The lecture is entitled "Mingling Art with Science" and it was delivered on Wednesday the 1st of February 2012.

Brain Day 2011: Maintaining control over visual orienting - age-related changes and potential remedies (53.66 MB)
Monday, 9 May 2011
Brain Day 2011 is sponsored by the Neurological Foundation of NZ and the University of Otago. As part of Brain Awareness Week, we join this major international effort to communicate the wonders and achievements of brain research. Dr Liana Machado from the Department of Psychology speaks on “Maintaining control over visual orienting: Age related changes and potential remedies” Held March 19, 2011.

Brain Day 2011: Shedding light on Parkinson's Disease (63.42 MB)
Monday, 9 May 2011
Brain Day 2011 is sponsored by the Neurological Foundation of NZ and the University of Otago. As part of Brain Awareness Week, we join this major international effort to communicate the wonders and achievements of brain research. Dr Louise Parr-Brownlie, from the Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, speaks on “Shedding light on Parkinson’s Disease” Held March 19, 2011.

Brain Day 2011: Stimulating the brain with electricity - from electric rays to magnetic coils (57.06 MB)
Monday, 9 May 2011
Brain Day 2011 is sponsored by the Neurological Foundation of NZ and the University of Otago. As part of Brain Awareness Week, we join this major international effort to communicate the wonders and achievements of brain research. Dr Andrew Clarkson from the Departments of Psychology and Anatomy & Structural Biology speaks on “Understanding how the brain can be repaired after a stroke” Held March 19, 2011.