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Multimorbidity: the most common long-term condition of all

Te Matetini: Te tino mate mau tonu

Monday 12 February 2018

Multimorbidity – the presence of more than one long-term condition in an individual – is a significant global issue. With the number of patients with more than one long-term condition rising exponentially, our health system is facing growing pressure to treat increasingly complex patients with finite and already stretched resources. From the patient’s perspective, living with more than one long-term condition can be incredibly difficult – particularly when it comes to navigating a health system primarily designed to deal with individual conditions in silo.

This research symposium will bring together researchers from the University of Otago, Wellington and elsewhere to describe the multimorbidity burden on patients and the health system, and discuss possible solutions for its future management and control.

Topics covered  

In the morning session, we will cover general topics related to identifying and understanding the multimorbidity burden in New Zealand. Topics discussed will include:

  • Overview of multimorbidity: what it is, why it matters, and how it is measured
  • The epidemiology of multimorbidity occurrence in New Zealand
  • Understanding the impact of multimorbidity from the patient’s perspective
  • The impact of multimorbidity on hospital admissions and ambulatory-sensitive hospitalisations (ASH)
  • Mental illness and multimorbidity
  • Diabetes and multimorbidity

In the afternoon session, we will focus on some potential solutions to the multimorbidity problem. Topics discussed will include:

  • The amendment of current clinical guidelines to allow for patient multimorbidity
  • Primary care interventions aimed at improving outcomes for patients with multimorbidity
  • The effectiveness of an intervention aimed at improving outcomes for patients with cancer and multimorbidity
  • Self-management interventions for patients with diabetes
  • Improving cardiovascular risk prediction with mental health data
  • Frameworks for the prevention of long-term conditions

Style of course

This is a research symposium-style course comprised of multiple short presentations, and lots of opportunity for interactive discussion between the speakers and the audience. 

Who should attend?  

This course is aimed at anyone with an interest in multimorbidity – from health service managers, clinicians and administrators, through to health researchers working at the interface between research and health services.

Draft timetable

Time Session
8:30am Registration
9am

Mihi Whakatau
Welcome, organisation, housekeeping  -Jason Gurney
Overview of Multimorbidity - Di Sarfati

Session One: Identifying the Problem
Multimorbidity epidemiology in NZ - James Stanley
Qualitative work - Louise Signal/Jeannine Stairmand

Discussion time

10:30am Morning tea
11am Multimorbidity survey: key results - Elinor Millar and Jeannine Stairmand
The impact of multimorbidity on hospital admissions and ambulatory-sensitive hospitalisations - Jason Gurney and James Stanley
Mental illness and multimorbidity -  Ruth Cunningham
Diabetes and multimorbidity - Jason Gurney
Discussion
12:30pm Lunch break
1:30pm Session Two: Searching For Solutions
Overview of Session Two - Di Sarfati
Amending current clinical guidelines - Elinor Millar
Primary care perspectives - Dee Mangin
An intervention aimed at improving outcomes for people with cancer and multimorbidity - Di Sarfati
Discussion
3pm Afternoon tea
3:30pm The BetaMe study: a patient-centred self-management intervention for diabetes  -Melissa McLeod
Augmenting cardiovascular risk prediction tools with mental illness data to improve outcomes - Ruth Cunningham
A framework for the prevention of long-term conditions - Ruth Richards
Discussion – Where To From Here? - All Speakers
5pm Finish

Teaching staff  

  • Professor Diana Sarfati, Director of the Cancer and Chronic Conditions (C3) Research Group, Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington.
  • Dr Jason Gurney, Deputy Director of the C3 Research Group, Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington.
  • Professor Dee Mangin, Professor and Director of Research, University of Otago, Christchurch
  • Dr James Stanley, C3 Research Group, Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington.
  • Associate Professor Louise Signal, C3 Research Group, Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington.
  • Ms Jeannine Stairmand, C3 Research Group, Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington.
  • Dr Elinor Millar, C3 Research Group, Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington.
  • Dr Ruth Cunningham, Deputy Director of the C3 Research Group, Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington.
  • Dr Melissa McLeod, Public Health Physician and Senior Research Fellow, Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington.
  • Dr Ruth Richards, Public Health Physician, Regional Public Health, Wellington

Course cost and registration

$300 early bird, $400 after 20 December 2017.

A 50% discount is available to full-time students, those unwaged and University of Otago staff.

Register now