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"Turning the Tide" - Policy Recommendations

Z_Events_Turning-the-tide_Front-Image_650px widthThis report considers the health and environmental benefits of walking and cycling and sets out a clear set of actions to get us out of our cars and living healthier lives. The report was developed by a group of leading New Zealand and international experts who work in the active transport field (see below).

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PDF copies of the full and brief reports:

The report is the outcome of The Active Living and Environment Symposium (TALES) held in Dunedin in February 2019. This unique event brought together public heath, transport, environment and sustainability experts from around the world to address the environmental impact and long term health implications of a transport system favouring motorised transport in New Zealand.

Feedback

If you would like to provide feedback or comments on this report to the authors, submit your comments at http://bit.ly/turningthetidefeedback.

Your feedback will remain confidential.

Report Launch

On Monday, 29 April 2019, the report was launched at Sport New Zealand in Wellington. Mr Peter Miskimmin, Chief Executive of Sports New Zealand, opened the event followed by a speech from the Hon. Julie Anne Genter, Associate Minister for Health and Associate Minister for Transport. Lead authors, Associate Professor Sandra Mandic and Mr Andrew Jackson, presented report recommendations. The launch was attended by 47 stakeholders from government, transport, academia, public health and local council among many others.

Meetings with Stakeholders

Following the launch, report authors held meetings with stakeholders across New Zealand to initiate discussion and receive stakeholders' feedback on the key policy recommendations outlined in the report. As of 10 May 2019, over 150 stakeholders in Wellington, Christchurch and Auckland attended these meetings. Presentation in Dunedin is scheduled on 14 May 2019.

DatesCityPresentation details
30 Apr 2019WellingtonTransport Knowledge Hub presentation (by Andrew Jackson and Sandra Mandic); Hosted by Ministry of Transport
01 May 2019ChristchurchPresentation to stakeholders (by John Lieswyn and Sandra Mandic)
06-07 May 2019Auckland

Four presentations to stakeholders (by Erica Hinckson and Sandra Mandic); Hosted by Auckland Centre (University of Otago), Auckland University of Technology and Auckland Transport

14 May 2019Dunedin

Transport Knowledge Hub presentation (by Ben Wooliscroft and Sandra Mandic);
Hosted by Transport Research Network, University of Otago

  • Tuesday, 14 May 2019; 1:30-3:00 pm; Part of Transport Knowledge Hub event 'Active Transport in New Zealand'
    (Location: University of Otago, 563 Castle St North, Centre for Sustainability, Seminar Room); Register here

Register here to receive updates about the Turning the Tide report and be informed about upcoming meetings in your area.

For more information about updates and stakeholders' meetings, contact active.living@otago.ac.nz

Media reports

For further information

For further information or to discuss any aspect of this report please get in touch with:

Associate Professor Sandra Mandic
University of Otago
Email: sandra.mandic@otago.ac.nz

Mr Andrew Jackson
Consulting Jackson Ltd.
Email: andrewsstephen@hotmail.com

Authors

  • Associate Professor Sandra Mandic, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
  • Mr Andrew Jackson, Consulting Jackson Ltd, Wellington, New Zealand
  • Mr John Lieswyn, ViaStrada, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Professor Jennifer S Mindell, UCL (University College London), London, United Kingdom
  • Dr Enrique García Bengoechea, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland
  • Professor John C Spence, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
  • Associate Professor Ben Wooliscroft, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
  • Ms Celia Wade-Brown QSO, Living Streets Aotearoa, Wellington, New Zealand
  • Associate Professor Kirsten Coppell, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
  • Professor Erica Hinckson, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand