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Health Sciences staff profiles

Dr Brad Hurren

PositionProfessional Practice Fellow
DepartmentDepartment of Anatomy
QualificationsBSc PgDipSci MSc PhD
Research summaryStudent well-being / comfort during education in the anatomical sciences, developmental neurobiology
Teaching
  • HUBS (Human Body Systems) 191 and 192
  • ANAT/MELS 241 Cells to Systems
  • ANAT 242 Neurobiology
  • ANAT 243 Reproductive and Developmental Biology
  • ANAT 335 Neurobiology
  • PHTY 250 Anatomy for Physiotherapy
Memberships
  • Microscopy New Zealand
  • European Molecular Biology Organization
  • Australian and New Zealand Association of Clinical Anatomists
  • Ako Aotearoa Academy of Tertiary Teaching Excellence

Research

Brad is a Professional Practice Fellow / Kairukuruku Ritenga Utua in the Department of Anatomy / Te Tari Kikokiko. Brad teaches into 100- and 200-level Anatomy papers, as well as professional programmes such as Physiotherapy, and is also one of the Kaiāwhina Māori for the Department.

Brad grew up in Whakatāne, but moved south in 2001 to enrol in a BSc Anatomy at Otago. Since then, he has completed a Postgraduate Diploma and a Masters degree in developmental neurobiology, where he looked at the role neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) plays in the development of the central and peripheral nervous systems. He became a Teaching Fellow in 2007, where he worked on the development of the HUBS 191 and HUBS 192 papers as a part of the revamped Health Sciences First Year curriculum. In 2009, Brad remained a part-time Teaching Fellow while enrolled as a full-time PhD candidate – in this project he investigated the crucial relationships between the developing nerve and muscle pregenitors during the early establishment of skeletal muscles in the limbs. He completed his PhD in 2013 and resumed his full-time teaching role.

In recent years, Brad’s research interests have moved him away from the lab bench and into educational research. He now has a research focus that centres on how students approach learning anatomy, and how teaching staff can improve the learning experience and comfort levels of students as they face potentially challenging classroom scenarios such as dissection, handling donated human tissues and working with animals in teaching and research. His commitment to student experience and wellbeing has resulted in him receiving accolades at both the Otago and national levels including:

Brad is also founding member of ASERT (Anatomical Sciences Education Research Team), and is also on the Executive Committee for the Ako Aotearoa Academy of Tertiary Teaching Excellence.
Ako Executive Committee

Publications

Bird, R. J., & Hurren, B. J. (2016). Anatomical and clinical aspects of Klinefelter's syndrome. Clinical Anatomy, 29(5), 606-619. doi: 10.1002/ca.22695

Hurren, B. J., & Flack, N. A. M. S. (2016). Prader-Willi syndrome: A spectrum of anatomical and clinical features. Clinical Anatomy, 29(5), 590-605. doi: 10.1002/ca.22686

Hurren, B., Collins, J. J. P., Duxson, M. J., & Deries, M. (2015). First neuromuscular contact correlates with onset of primary myogenesis in rat and mouse limb muscles. PLoS ONE, 10(7), e0133811. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0133811

Woolley, A. G., Tait, K. J., Hurren, B. J., Fisher, L., Sheard, P. W., & Duxson, M. J. (2008). Developmental loss of NT-3 in vivo results in reduced levels of myelin-specific proteins, a reduced extent of myelination and increased apoptosis of Schwann cells. GLIA, 56(3), 306-317. doi: 10.1002/glia.20614

Journal - Research Article

Bird, R. J., & Hurren, B. J. (2016). Anatomical and clinical aspects of Klinefelter's syndrome. Clinical Anatomy, 29(5), 606-619. doi: 10.1002/ca.22695

Hurren, B. J., & Flack, N. A. M. S. (2016). Prader-Willi syndrome: A spectrum of anatomical and clinical features. Clinical Anatomy, 29(5), 590-605. doi: 10.1002/ca.22686

Hurren, B., Collins, J. J. P., Duxson, M. J., & Deries, M. (2015). First neuromuscular contact correlates with onset of primary myogenesis in rat and mouse limb muscles. PLoS ONE, 10(7), e0133811. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0133811

Woolley, A. G., Tait, K. J., Hurren, B. J., Fisher, L., Sheard, P. W., & Duxson, M. J. (2008). Developmental loss of NT-3 in vivo results in reduced levels of myelin-specific proteins, a reduced extent of myelination and increased apoptosis of Schwann cells. GLIA, 56(3), 306-317. doi: 10.1002/glia.20614

More publications...