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Passion for staff wellbeing recognised

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Thursday, 24 October 2019

The mental health and wellbeing of those around her is important to Rachel Kinnaird.  Her dedication and commitment to provide a healthy work environment for her team and raise awareness of positive wellbeing within the Department of Anatomy has seen her awarded the University of Otago Excellence Award in Health and Safety (Individual) for 2019.

Biochem helps bring Being Brainy to Central Otago

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Monday, 21 October 2019

Children in Central Otago learned about the wonders of the human brain earlier this month, thanks to an initiative by Brain Research New Zealand, and volunteers from the Universities of Otago and Auckland.

Sore calves, good cause

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Wednesday, 16 October 2019

A group of staff in Otago’s Department of Anatomy are this week sporting a sense of achievement, and also sore calf muscles, after taking part in Leukaemia & Blood Cancer New Zealand’s Stadium Climb Challenge at Forsyth Barr Stadium on Sunday.

Scientists and artists peer into each other’s worlds

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Monday, 30 September 2019

Otago Biochemistry research into a seaweed protein and ice formation have inspired the creation of two beautiful artworks: a knitted cowl and a piece of contemporary embroidery, part of a recent exhibition of art inspired by science held at the Otago Museum.

PhD, Postdoc & Beyond …

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Tuesday, 24 September 2019

Yesterday, the newly-minted University of Otago Postdoctoral Association hosted a very successful careers symposium for early career scientists. The keynote address was given by Professor Juliet Gerrard, the Prime Minister's Chief Science Advisor.

Staff and students give thanks

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Thursday, 19 September 2019

The Department of Anatomy held its annual Thanksgiving Service in Dunedin recently.  Family and friends of our donors, along with staff and students attended the service to honour and remember those generous people who have donated their body to medical science teaching and research. 

2019 Endeavour Fund Success for Otago Biochemistry

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Wednesday, 18 September 2019

Otago Biochemistry is celebrating this week after finding out that Associate Professor Richard Macknight and Dr Lynette Brownfield have successfully won funding from the Endeavour Fund for their project to improve New Zealand’s most important source of food for cows and sheep: ryegrass.

Communicating the Loch Ness study

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Tuesday, 17 September 2019

Earlier this month Otago’s Professor Neil Gemmell travelled to Scotland to reveal the findings of his environmental DNA study of Loch Ness. Anticipating an avalanche of global media attention, Senior Communications Adviser Mark Hathaway accompanied him. He writes about the experience for the Otago Bulletin Board.

Otago Biochemistry at Queenstown Science Extravaganza

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Tuesday, 17 September 2019

Queenstown Research Week this year was bustling with Otago Biochemistry researchers, who contributed as invited speakers, poster presenters, general delegates, and organisers. The biological science extravaganza is a cluster of meetings co-ordinated into one week, held each September. Attendees come to learn about the latest research carried out around New Zealand, do a little science networking, and enjoy the bonus of some of New Zealand’s most spectacular scenery.

First eDNA Study Of Loch Ness Points To Something Fishy

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Thursday, 5 September 2019

University of Otago geneticist, Professor Neil Gemmell can today announce the results of investigations into the environmental DNA present in the British Isles largest and second deepest body of fresh water, Loch Ness.

World’s largest army is brutal, but could be beneficial

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Wednesday, 28 August 2019

Is there a solution to bacteria becoming resistant to antibiotics? One answer may be found by studying the world’s largest and most brutal army, new University of Otago microbiology research shows.

Dr Andrew Bahn awarded Arthritis NZ Project Grant

Tuesday, 16 July 2019

Congratulations to Dr Bahn who has been awarded a $60K grant for his project "Identification of oxypurinol transporters to decipher drug-drug interactions in gout treatment”

Otago study unlocks secrets of sex change in fish

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Thursday, 11 July 2019

A University of Otago-led study is heralding advances in our understanding of one of the most startling transformations in the natural world – the complete reversal of sex that occurs in about 500 species of fish.

Cycle Challenge to help Heart Foundation

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Friday, 28 June 2019

Cycling at the end of July may not be everybody's cup of tea but when you are raising money for the Heart Foundation and doing it indoors, anyone can join in – and you don't even have to wear lycra!

Central Otago cemetery might be next for archaeological research

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Wednesday, 26 June 2019

With successful operations in the small Otago towns of Milton and Lawrence complete, the University of Otago’s Otago Historic Cemeteries Bioarchaeology Project is now looking to partner with the historic Drybread Cemetery, deep in the heart of Central Otago.

Otago enhances its relations with Jinan University

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Tuesday, 21 May 2019

The University signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with one of China’s oldest universities last week, formalising a working relationship between researchers at the two institutions.

Study helps explain why some of our famous flightless birds can’t fly

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Friday, 5 April 2019

University of Otago researchers in association with colleagues from Harvard University have discovered new evidence of what made some of New Zealand’s iconic birds such as the kiwi and extinct moa, flightless.

Webster Family Chair in Pathogenesis appointment

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Friday, 22 March 2019

Following an extensive international search, Professor Miguel Quiñones-Mateu has been appointed as the second holder of the Webster Family Chair in Viral Pathogenesis in the University of Otago’s Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Biomedical Sciences.

Prof Parry Guilford hosts Wanaka gastric cancer summit

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Wednesday, 20 March 2019

Wanaka shared its best scenery with a special group of national and international visitors in March. The 2019 Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Consensus Clinical Guidelines Meeting had a wide variety of attendees, including scientists, doctors, genetic counsellors, and family members directly affected by hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC).

Otago discovery paves way for precision medicine in future

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Wednesday, 20 March 2019

University of Otago scientists have discovered a way to view the immune cell 'landscape' of bowel cancer tumours, paving the way towards more individualised medicine and treatment for many other diseases in future.

Dr Jillian Evans, pharmaceutical development legend, visits Otago Biochemistry

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Wednesday, 13 March 2019

Recently, the Department hosted one of New Zealand’s most successful expat scientists, Dr Jillian Evans.

Among her many achievements, she has helped to develop three drugs for the treatment of diseases such as cystic fibrosis and asthma, and co-found several successful pharmaceutical companies.

Are New Zealand’s giant birds of prey just exiled Aussies?

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Wednesday, 20 February 2019

An international team of researchers including scientists from the University of Otago and Canterbury Museum has brought new knowledge around how the world’s largest eagle came to live in New Zealand. The study published this week in “Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution” traces the Haast’s eagle back to Australia, but it was only after more than two million years of evolution in New Zealand that the bird became a global giant.