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Articles for the keyword(s) "Lis alibi pendens"

"Conflict of Laws"

RJ Paterson, 1992

The author reviews significant Conflict of Laws cases from 1990 and 1992. The review focuses on the existence of jurisdiction, submission to jurisdiction and subject matter jurisdiction, as well as the relevance and application of forum non conveniens with reference to protest to jurisdiction, jurisdiction clauses, lis alibi pendens, service within New Zealand, and summary judgment proceedings, as well as family law proceedings and international child abduction cases. The author also covers the enforcement of foreign judgments at common law, as well as by statute.

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"Judgments Extension under CER"

Reid Mortensen, 1999

This article discusses the Closer Economic Relations (CER) Trade Agreement entered into between New Zealand and Australia in 1983 with specific reference to the removal of legal impediments to trade. The author criticises the CER scheme as it does little to improve the efficiency in respect of trans-Tasman judgment extensions. An in-depth analysis follows into alternative mechanisms available for judgment enforcement, with specific reference to the European and Australian models. The author concludes with proposals for the adoption of a “direct jurisdiction” model for the CER scheme.

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"The Hague and the Ditch: The Trans-Tasman Judicial Area and the Choice of Court Convention"

Reid Mortensen, 2009

Following an analysis of the history and current context of the proposed Trans-Tasman regime (within the CER framework), this article explores the comparative value of the Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements for Australia and New Zealand. Although the Convention and the proposed Trans-Tasman regime are profoundly different, the author concludes that the adoption of the Convention would provide an opportunity for both countries to increase certainty in international trade and commercial relationships. More specifically, reference to the Convention would address the risk of lis pendens and incompatible judgments in the proposed Trans-Tasman regime.