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Articles for the keyword(s) "Principle of territoriality"

"From Savigny to Cyberspace: Does the Internet Sound the Death-Knell for the Conflict of Laws?"

Campbell McLachlan, 2006

This article examines the challenges posed by the internet for classic conflicts theory and method in regard to cross-border communications with specific reference to defamation, privacy and copyright. A detailed comparative survey refers extensively to law reform initiatives and jurisprudential developments in a number of Anglo-Commonwealth countries, as well as Europe. The author explores the dynamics of the interplay between jurisdiction and choice of law and its effect on the traditional principle of territoriality within the context of cross-border communications disputes.

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"The 'Statutist Trap' and Subject-Matter Jurisdiction"

Maria Hook, 2017

This article explores the problems associated with an exclusive focus by courts on statutory interpretation when determining whether a statute applies to foreign facts, overlooking the application of conflict of laws principles. This focus is referred to as “statutism.” In particular, the author focuses on how statutism risks distortion of established notions of subject-matter jurisdiction in two ways. First, statutism can lead courts to overlook the choice of law process. Courts may conclude that if the relevant statute does not apply they must lack subject-matter jurisdiction over the dispute, overlooking the possibility that they can adjudicate the dispute according to foreign law. Second, statutism, by deciding the question of subject-matter jurisdiction according to statutory interpretation, prevents a proper analysis of whether the court has subject-matter jurisdiction according to the external conflict of laws framework.