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Articles for the keyword(s) "Registration of foreign judgments"

"Conflict of Laws and Legal Aid"

PRH Webb, 1974

This is a brief comment on Connor v Connor [1974] 1 NZLR 632, focusing on the rule that a court will not enforce foreign revenue or other public laws. The author endorses the decision of the Court that a foreign legal aid scheme does not fall under the category of foreign revenue laws.

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"The Hague and the Ditch: The Trans-Tasman Judicial Area and the Choice of Court Convention"

Reid Mortensen, 2009

Following an analysis of the history and current context of the proposed Trans-Tasman regime (within the CER framework), this article explores the comparative value of the Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements for Australia and New Zealand. Although the Convention and the proposed Trans-Tasman regime are profoundly different, the author concludes that the adoption of the Convention would provide an opportunity for both countries to increase certainty in international trade and commercial relationships. More specifically, reference to the Convention would address the risk of lis pendens and incompatible judgments in the proposed Trans-Tasman regime.

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"Judgments Extension under CER"

Reid Mortensen, 1999

This article discusses the Closer Economic Relations (CER) Trade Agreement entered into between New Zealand and Australia in 1983 with specific reference to the removal of legal impediments to trade. The author criticises the CER scheme as it does little to improve the efficiency in respect of trans-Tasman judgment extensions. An in-depth analysis follows into alternative mechanisms available for judgment enforcement, with specific reference to the European and Australian models. The author concludes with proposals for the adoption of a “direct jurisdiction” model for the CER scheme.

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"Global Disputes – Jurisdiction, Interim Relief and Enforcement of Judgments"

David Goddard, 1999

This contribution contains extracts from a paper prepared by David Goddard for the NZLS triennial conference. The focus is on cross-border disputes, especially trans-Tasman disputes, and the problems involved in the enforcement of interim orders and final judgments. The inadequacy of legislation in this area is highlighted and accession to and participation in relevant international conventions are recommended.