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Articles for the keyword(s) "Restitution "

"Choice of Law in Equitable Wrongs: A Comparative Analysis"

Laurette Barnard, 1992

This article presents a comprehensive and in-depth comparative analysis of characterisation and choice of law in relation to equitable wrongs in English, Australian, Canadian and New Zealand law. The author proposes a flexible choice of law regime, based on the proper law of the claim, which should be determined with reference to the essential nature of equitable obligations and the policies operating in the field of fiduciary and related duties. Since the gaining of access to the beneficiary’s assets is the origin of the equitable obligation, the law under which access was gained should, subject to exceptions, constitute the proper law.

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"From Savigny to Cyberspace: Does the Internet Sound the Death-Knell for the Conflict of Laws?"

Campbell McLachlan, 2006

This article examines the challenges posed by the internet for classic conflicts theory and method in regard to cross-border communications with specific reference to defamation, privacy and copyright. A detailed comparative survey refers extensively to law reform initiatives and jurisprudential developments in a number of Anglo-Commonwealth countries, as well as Europe. The author explores the dynamics of the interplay between jurisdiction and choice of law and its effect on the traditional principle of territoriality within the context of cross-border communications disputes.

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“The Law Governing Letters of Credit”

Anthea Markstein, 2010

The author argues that the ‘rule’ that the same law should govern all contracts in a letter of credit transaction should be jettisoned in favour of an approach that seeks to achieve uniformity in the governing law only where such an outcome is supported by the parties’ commercial expectations. It is suggested that where commercial expectations do not support uniformity of governing law across all contracts, legal certainty and ascertaining the governing law most connected to the contract should be the paramount policy considerations. The author analyses three possible approaches as to how this may be achieved in the context of freely negotiable letters of credit.