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Articles for the keyword(s) "Cross-border tort"

“Cox v Ergo Versicherung AG: Statutory Packages in Transnational Personal Injury Cases”

Elsabe Schoeman, 2015

The assessment of damages in transnational personal injury claims poses a unique challenge for private international law theory and practice. Traditionally viewed as a procedural matter, there are strong reasons for the assessment of damages to be recognised as an integral part of a personal injury statutory package to be governed by the lex causae of the tort. This article questions the characterisation of the assessment of damages as substantive or procedural to determine which law governs such assessment, arguing that Etherton LJ’s approach, focusing on the causal connection between liability and loss, may provide a better approach to statutory packages.

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"From Savigny to Cyberspace: Does the Internet Sound the Death-Knell for the Conflict of Laws?"

Campbell McLachlan, 2006

This article examines the challenges posed by the internet for classic conflicts theory and method in regard to cross-border communications with specific reference to defamation, privacy and copyright. A detailed comparative survey refers extensively to law reform initiatives and jurisprudential developments in a number of Anglo-Commonwealth countries, as well as Europe. The author explores the dynamics of the interplay between jurisdiction and choice of law and its effect on the traditional principle of territoriality within the context of cross-border communications disputes.

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"Reform of Choice of Law Rules for Tort"

Jack Wass and Maria Hook, 2017

The authors comment upon various aspects of the Private International Law (Choice of Law in Tort) Bill. The Bill abolishes the long-standing double actionability rule governing the choice of law in tort claims in New Zealand. The approach mandated by the Bill is that the New Zealand courts apply the lex loci delicti, with a flexible exception where the case is substantially more closely connected with another country. The authors explain the Bill’s approach and argue that it is sufficiently versatile to cover claims such as defamation and breach of intellectual property rights. The authors suggest that the Bill should exclude the doctrine of renvoi, given that the function of choice of law rules is to identify which country’s law New Zealand courts, not foreign courts, should apply to a particular claim. Finally, the authors recommend that the Bill allow for future common law developments in cases where parties agree as to the law that should apply to tort claims arising within their relationship.