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Articles for the keyword(s) "Transnational disputes"

"Reforming New Zealand’s Conflicts Process: The Case for Internationalisation"

Campbell McLachlan, 1984

This article calls for the adoption of an internationalist approach in developing the discipline of private international law in New Zealand. With reference to trans-national custody disputes and international child abduction, the author illustrates the need for internationally agreed solutions in order to secure conflicts justice for individuals caught up in trans-national family disputes. New Zealand should participate in the work of Hague Conference on Private International Law and contribute to the development of uniform private international law rules.

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"Exclusive Jurisdiction Clauses – A New Zealand Perspective on the Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements"

G Shapira and R Lazarovitch, 2008

Exclusive jurisdiction clauses are a frequently used tool in transnational contracts. The parties agree on a forum that would hear any potential dispute. This should ensure certainty and predictability for all parties. However, the complexity of the New Zealand rules and the jurisdictional discretion of the courts lead to often unpredictable results when exclusive jurisdiction clauses are encountered. The 2005 Hague Convention on Choice of Court Agreements aims to address such problems with clear rules that promote certainty in commercial dealings and validate party autonomy. Even though the Convention is not free from criticism, the authors conclude that New Zealand should nonetheless adopt it.