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Articles for the keyword(s) "Unification of private international law rules"

"Reforming New Zealand’s Conflicts Process: The Case for Internationalisation"

Campbell McLachlan, 1984

This article calls for the adoption of an internationalist approach in developing the discipline of private international law in New Zealand. With reference to trans-national custody disputes and international child abduction, the author illustrates the need for internationally agreed solutions in order to secure conflicts justice for individuals caught up in trans-national family disputes. New Zealand should participate in the work of Hague Conference on Private International Law and contribute to the development of uniform private international law rules.

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"Choice of Law Clauses in International Contracts: Overseas Developments"

Nicky Richardson, 1992

The author provides an in-depth discussion and criticism of the Rome Convention on the Law Applicable to Contractual Obligations (1980). The essence of the discussion centres on how the Convention deals with the concept of party autonomy in contractual situations. The author concludes that Article 3 supports party autonomy and clarifies certain related matters, whereas Article 7(1), which relates to mandatory rules, is an ambiguous and uncertain provision. Lastly, it is suggested that the concepts of characteristic performance and mandatory rules should be considered when reforming New Zealand choice of law in contract.

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“Third (Anglo-Common Law) Countries and Rome II: Dilemma or Deliverance”

Elsabe Schoeman, 2011

The Rome II Regulation deals with choice of law in tort. The article examines the value of this Regulation vis-à-vis third (non-EU Anglo-Common law) countries, analysing the unique EU environment and the continuous movement towards uniformity and certainty. The author discusses the general choice of law regime laid down in Article 4 of the Regulation and applies it to two famous Anglo-Common law cases: Neilson v Overseas Projects Corporation of Victoria Ltd and Harding v Wealands, concluding that these cases would probably have been decided differently under Rome II. The article concludes that Rome II may indeed have comparative value for these third countries and that its importance should not be underestimated.