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Articles for the keyword(s) "Wife’s domicile of dependence"

"Divorce, The Royal Commission, and the Conflict of Laws"

JW Davies and BD Inglis, 1957

The authors critically analyse certain provisions of the Royal Commission's Draft Code on Jurisdiction and Recognition (UK, annexed to the Report of the Royal Commission on Marriage and Divorce (1951-1955)) in the light of the New Zealand law governing jurisdiction in divorce cases, as well as the recognition of foreign divorce and nullity decrees. They conclude that, although the Draft Code contains valuable recommendations, New Zealand statutory reform has been progressive and already addresses most of the points raised by the Commission.

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"Jurisdiction in Nullity"

A Hiller, 1963

These articles present an in-depth survey of English common law, statutory law and case law in regard to jurisdiction in nullity actions. In a brief note annexed to the articles, the author pleads for a restrictive interpretation of the relevant New Zealand statutory provisions so that the English common law rules pertaining to jurisdiction in nullity suits would still apply.

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"Reform of the Law of Domicile"

CF Forsyth, 1977

The author highlights certain changes brought about by the New Zealand Domicile Act 1976, most notably the abolition of the wife’s domicile of dependence, new provisions in respect of the domicile of children and the abolition of the revival of the domicile of origin. Although there may be choice of law problems where spouses have different domiciles, the conclusion is that South African law could benefit from similar reforms.

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"Section 7 of the Matrimonial Property Act 1976: A Choice of Law Rule?"

CF Forsyth, 1976

The author highlights a number of issues in regard to s 7 of the Matrimonial Property Act 1976 as a “choice of law” rule, such as: the complexity of the section in respect of its limits of application, outside of which the common law rules apply, as well as the unqualified adoption and extension of the principle of mutability to all movable property. Problems surrounding express choice of law clauses in marriage settlements and alternatives to “matrimonial domicile” as a connecting factor are also addressed.

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"Divorce, The Royal Commission, and the Conflict of Laws"

JW Davies and BD Inglis, 1957

The authors critically analyse certain provisions of the Royal Commission’s Draft Code on Jurisdiction and Recognition (UK, annexed to the Report of the Royal Commission on Marriage and Divorce (1951-1955)) in the light of the New Zealand law governing jurisdiction in divorce cases, as well as the recognition of foreign divorce and nullity decrees. They conclude that, although the Draft Code contains valuable recommendations, New Zealand statutory reform has been progressive and already addresses most of the points raised by the Commission.