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Students or graduates with combined or double degrees

The Bachelor of Arts and Commerce and the Bachelor of Commerce and Science are new degrees so we don’t have any students who have completed them. Featured on this page are quotes and profiles from students or graduates with double degrees in Arts and Commerce and in Commerce and the Sciences who talk about the benefits of studying two subjects.

Tom Mottershead imageTom Mottershead

Bachelor of Arts and Science (Maths and Music)

In Tom Mottershead’s first year at Otago he was able to study his twin passions of music and maths, but he was limited to majoring in only one for an arts or science degree.

But then Otago developed the Bachelor of Arts and Science degree (BASc) to allow students with diverse interests to combine both disciplines.

“I’d always been interested in music in a big way but I was also good at maths and wanted to major in that too,” says Tom.

“When the BASc came up it was ideal and it all worked out perfectly for me. I didn’t need to change anything in the courses I was doing but just take the papers I wanted to take anyway for a double major in four years.

I didn’t need to change anything in the courses I was doing but just take the papers I wanted to take anyway for a double major in four years.

”Lecturers were great and really responsive with answering questions and all the libraries were really good. There’s a good variety of places to study.”

Tom spent two years at a residential college and took part in a number of student-run social events, including poker tournaments where “maths came in handy with having an understanding of probability.”

He also won awards for his studies in maths and in music composition.

After graduating Tom joined an online learning platform offering alternatives to textbooks for schools but is keeping his options open.

“I’m still considering teaching, which would allow me to continue with both music and maths, but I’m also still making music.

“I’ve done a couple of music video projects that I really enjoyed creating and that have been well received on social media. I’m also pursuing an interest in gospel music production. Maybe it’ll take off. Let’s see how things develop.”

Tom follows his own advice. “Find out for yourself what your values, skills, gifts and passions are. Go with what you find enjoyable over what you might be expected to do.”

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India Power imageIndia Power

Double degree: Bachelor of Commerce (Economics) and Bachelor of Applied Science (Molecular Biotechnology)

When India Power’s interests changed part-way through her degree, she discovered that Otago’s flexible degree structure could easily accommodate her revised study plans.

“I initially wanted to study biomedical sciences and was drawn to Otago’s interdisciplinary approach to study and focus on research. While studying, I became interested in biotechnology and the application of scientific research so I changed to a BAppSc and transferred the papers I had already completed.

“Along with the sciences, I enjoyed economics at school. When I became interested in business within the biotech industry, studying economics was a natural fit.

“My interests definitely evolved while I was at Otago. Even though I started in one discipline, being able to change degrees without losing the papers I had already done meant my studies could follow my interests.”

" The wider perspective I gained reassured me that studying two subjects was worthwhile."

Going on exchange to the UK helped cement her decision to study two majors.

“I studied at the University of Edinburgh for a year and then spent three months backpacking around Europe. I learnt a lot about myself, made some amazing friends and went far outside my comfort zone. The wider perspective I gained reassured me that studying two subjects was worthwhile.”

India also took advantage of Otago’s internship programme and spent three months working at the Reserve Bank.

“I learnt a lot about central banking while putting my studies into practice. It allowed me to see where my degree could take me and opened my eyes to what I could achieve. It was incredibly inspiring and the motivation I needed to undertake a Master of Economics.

“No subject is ‘stand-alone’, they all interact in different ways. If you are interested in two subjects, you may as well take advantage of the flexibility Otago offers and follow your interests.”

Please note: India completed a double degree not a Bachelor of Commerce and Science.

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Tessa Aitken imageTessa Aitken

Double degree: Studying for a Bachelor of Commerce (Economics) and a Bachelor of Arts (Chinese)

Tessa Aitken chose to study two majors to expand her future career opportunities and align with her interests.

“I lived in Singapore for most of my primary years which sparked my passion for Mandarin. In January, I returned from a nine-week immersion program in Chengdu, China. I was selected alongside other tertiary students for the Prime Minister’s Scholarship which enabled me to work in a sustainable ecotourism company in Chengdu.

“I believe a language is a gateway to the future and with an Asian-focused economy, I think my combination of Chinese and commerce will help me understand the differences in the way global businesses are run and forge better trade relationships.

"I believe a language is a gateway to the future and with an Asian-focused economy, I think my combination of Chinese and commerce will help me understand the differences in the way global businesses are run and forge better trade relationships."

“Economics was my favourite subject at school. I love keeping up with global news and believe economics is the key to understanding how the world works and operates.”

Tessa has thrown herself into many of the business opportunities on offer at Otago, including the entrepreneurial programme Audacious. She’s also the competition representative on Otago’s Commerce Students’ Association (COMSA).

“This is a great opportunity to help commerce students get the most out of their degree and have fun while doing it. I represent Otago in Case Competitions for nationals and have been selected to represent Team New Zealand Universities at the Central European Case Competition in Budapest this year. These opportunities have helped me develop more confidence in public speaking, consulting and analytical skills.”

Her advice to students unsure of what to study?

“Take subjects you are truly interested in. Otago makes it easy for you to combine different areas of study.”

Please note: Tessa is studying for a double degree not a Bachelor of Arts and Commerce.

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Merekara Warrington imageMerekara Warrington

Choosing a double degree of a Bachelor of Commerce, majoring in Tourism, and a Bachelor of Arts, majoring in Māori Studies, enabled Merekara Warrington to engage in some of her key interests.

“I was passionate about both subjects due to my interest in travel, people interactions, indigenous knowledge, worldviews and language. In my opinion, the two degrees can complement each other and work well together.”

"I also thought it would be practical to have two degrees – one that had a lot of applied theory and one that was interesting and relevant to living in New Zealand."

Merekara enjoyed the teaching of the tourism lecturers, who she found knowledgeable and charismatic.

“I felt like I learned so much from them and had good interactions with them all in the classes and during their office hours if I needed extra guidance or clarification.

“In fact the support I received from both the School of Business and the Department of Māori, Pacific and Indigenous Studies was outstanding, and my classmates were friendly and motivated.”

She also thought that the structure of the tourism papers had a good balance between group and individual assignments, and between theory and practice.

“The assignments were well-formatted in that the theoretical learnings taught in-class were practically applied within case studies and real-life scenarios outlined in the assignments.”

Since graduating, Merekara has been working for her iwi to implement, maintain and grow their freshwater and land restoration aspirations. She believes that the methods and processes she learned through her two degrees have continued to be transferable and useful in her work.

“Completing my degrees inspired me to pursue employment in a space where I could blend my knowledge of Māori culture with the potential benefits that tourism could offer. I was also very interested in using my learning within my tribe.”

“By completing two degrees, I showed my current employers that I was motivated, passionate and disciplined to commit to four years of studying.”

Please note: Merekara completed a double degree not a Bachelor of Arts and Commerce.