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ANTH231 The Emergence of Agriculture: An Archaeological Journey

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Understanding the emergence of world agriculture from an archaeological perspective. Detailed case examples will be given from China, the Near East, Europe, the Americas and the Pacific.

Understanding the emergence of world agriculture from an archaeological perspective. Detailed case examples will be given from China, the Near East, Europe, the Americas and the Pacific.

The warming of the earth some 10,000 years ago marks the independent invention of agriculture across the globe. This ‘Neolithic Revolution’ was one of the most important milestones of Humankind which led to major changes to Human Society!! Yet, many parts of the world took a different path towards its appearance. Take a journey with us in studying the development of agriculture in the Near East, Asia, Europe, the Americas, Africa and the Pacific. The latest findings from across the globe will be presented.

Paper title The Emergence of Agriculture: An Archaeological Journey
Paper code ANTH231
Subject Anthropology
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Semester 2 (On campus)
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $1,092.15
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $5,004.75

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Prerequisite
One of ANTH 103, ANTH 104, ANTH 106, ARCH 101 or 54 points
Restriction
ANTH 331, ARCH 305
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Contact

glenn.summerhayes@otago.ac.nz

Teaching staff

Professor Glenn Summerhayes

Textbooks

There are many books on the emergence of agriculture. The recommended text book is:

G. Barker 2006. The Agricultural Revolution in Prehistory: Why did Foragers become Farmers. OUP.

This is major reference for this course. His chapters cover most of the lectures I will present.

Course outline

Will be available at the first lecture and on Blackboard.

Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Interdisciplinary perspective, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Environmental literacy, Information literacy, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
  • Develop a critical understanding the emergence of world agriculture from an archaeological perspective. Detailed case examples will be given from China, the Near East, Europe, the Americas and the Pacific.
  • Understand the impact of this ‘Revolution’ on human society.
  • Develop the analytical abilities in undertaking research into the past using primary and secondary sources to construct arguments articulating these within structured works.
  • Develop an understanding of the principles that govern natural systems, the effects of human activity on these systems, and the cultures and economies that interact with those systems.
  • Understanding why archaeology is fun.

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Timetable

Semester 2

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
A1 Tuesday 12:00-12:50 28-34, 36-41
Thursday 13:00-13:50 28-34, 36-41

Practical

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
A1 Tuesday 16:00-16:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40

Understanding the emergence of world agriculture from an archaeological perspective. Detailed case examples will be given from China, the Near East, Europe, the Americas and the Pacific.

Understanding the emergence of world agriculture from an archaeological perspective. Detailed case examples will be given from China, the Near East, Europe, the Americas and the Pacific.

The warming of the earth some 10,000 years ago marks the independent invention of agriculture across the globe. This ‘Neolithic Revolution’ was one of the most important milestones of Humankind which led to major changes to Human Society!! Yet, many parts of the world took a different path towards its appearance. Take a journey with us in studying the development of agriculture in the Near East, Asia, Europe, the Americas, Africa and the Pacific. The latest findings from across the globe will be presented.

Paper title The Emergence of Agriculture: An Archaeological Journey
Paper code ANTH231
Subject Anthropology
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Semester 2 (On campus)
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2022 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
One of ANTH 103, ANTH 104, ANTH 106, ARCH 101 or 54 points
Restriction
ANTH 331, ARCH 305
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Contact

glenn.summerhayes@otago.ac.nz

Teaching staff

Professor Glenn Summerhayes

Textbooks

There are many books on the emergence of agriculture. The recommended text book is:

G. Barker 2006. The Agricultural Revolution in Prehistory: Why did Foragers become Farmers. OUP.

This is major reference for this course. His chapters cover most of the lectures I will present.

Course outline

Will be available at the first lecture and on Blackboard.

Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Interdisciplinary perspective, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Environmental literacy, Information literacy, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
  • Develop a critical understanding the emergence of world agriculture from an archaeological perspective. Detailed case examples will be given from China, the Near East, Europe, the Americas and the Pacific.
  • Understand the impact of this ‘Revolution’ on human society.
  • Develop the analytical abilities in undertaking research into the past using primary and secondary sources to construct arguments articulating these within structured works.
  • Develop an understanding of the principles that govern natural systems, the effects of human activity on these systems, and the cultures and economies that interact with those systems.
  • Understanding why archaeology is fun.

^ Top of page

Timetable

Semester 2

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
A1 Tuesday 13:00-13:50 28-34, 36-41
Thursday 13:00-13:50 28-34, 36-41

Practical

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend one stream from
A1 Tuesday 16:00-16:50 29, 31, 33, 36, 38, 40
A2 Tuesday 16:00-16:50 30, 32, 34, 37, 39, 41