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ECON406 Labour and Population Economics

Covers advanced topics in labour and population economics.

This paper provides an in-depth study of how individuals and households make important life decisions, in particular:

  • How much to invest in one's own human capital
  • How and whether to interact with the labour market
  • How to decide where to live and with whom to interact and what impact these decisions have on one's income, wealth, health, happiness and other measures of wellbeing.
These are the core decisions studied in labour and population economics. The paper is designed to both introduce students to some of the key research in a broad topic area and to get them to think about how to both evaluate other's research and produce high-quality research of their own.

Paper title Labour and Population Economics
Paper code ECON406
Subject Economics
EFTS 0.1667
Points 20 points
Teaching period Not offered in 2019
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $1,079.88
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $4,786.79

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Prerequisite
ECON 375
Restriction
ECON 442
Contact
economics@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
To be advised.
Textbooks
A reading list will be provided for each class.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Scholarship, Critical thinking, Research, Self-motivation, Teamwork.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
ECON 406 has three objectives:
  • To learn about the fundamentals of good research and the econometric methods and empirical modelling strategies frequently used in applied microeconomic research. This will build upon what students have previously learned in more theoretically based econometrics classes and show them how empirical methods can be applied to learn about the world around us
  • To learn about how individuals and households make important life decisions, in particular:
    • How much to invest in one's own human capital
    • How and whether to interact with the labour market
    • How to decide where to live and with whom to interact
    and what impact these decisions have on one's income, wealth, health, happiness and other measures of wellbeing. These are the core decisions studied in labour and population economics
  • To learn about both classic research papers of fundamental importance and recent cutting-edge research on the topics discussed in the second objective
The paper will discuss examples from both developed and developing countries to give students a well-rounded introduction to the literature in this broad research area. Overall, the objectives are meant to complement each other and both introduce students to some of the key research in a broad topic area and to get them to think about how to both evaluate others' research and produce high-quality research of their own.

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Timetable

Not offered in 2019

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
None