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PHIL332 Early Modern Philosophy B: Locke, Berkeley, Hume

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The central issues in the philosophy of Locke and its subsequent impact on the philosophy of Berkeley and Hume.

This paper in the history of philosophy has as its primary focus the study of three of the most influential British thinkers of the early modern period: John Locke, George Berkeley and David Hume. We will study and discuss Locke's main texts and the influence they had on both Berkeley and Hume.

Paper title Early Modern Philosophy B: Locke, Berkeley, Hume
Paper code PHIL332
Subject Philosophy
EFTS 0.15
Points 18 points
Teaching period First Semester (On campus)
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $913.95
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $4,073.40

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Prerequisite
One 200-level PHIL paper
Restriction
PHIL 201, PHIL 220, PHIL 232, PHIL 320
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Contact
michael.lebuffe@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff
Professor Michael LeBuffe
Paper Structure

In the first part of the paper, we examine Locke's 'Essay Concerning Human Understanding', focusing on his theory of ideas, his accounts of knowledge and belief, and his metaphysics. We then turn to Berkeley's 'Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge', emphasizing Berkeley's responses to Locke and his idealism. Finally, we turn to Hume's 'Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding'. We emphasize his theory of impressions and ideas and his views on causation.

Textbooks
  • Locke, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding. Edited by Nidditch. Oxford University Press.
  • Berkeley, A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge. Edited by Winkler. Hackett.
  • Hume, Enquiries Concerning Human Understanding and Concerning the Principles of Morals. Edited by Nidditch. Oxford University Press.
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Ethics, Research.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
Students who successfully complete the paper should be able to
  • Present, criticise and defend the positions and central arguments of Locke, Berkeley and Hume
  • Demonstrate understanding and correct use of philosophical concepts involved in the paper
  • Explain different accounts of the relation between scientific practices in 17th- and 18th-century Europe and the authors' positions in metaphysics and epistemology
  • Explain different accounts of the relation between religious practices in 17th- and 18th-century Europe and the authors' positions in metaphysics and epistemology
  • Demonstrate familiarity with and understanding of central course texts
  • Use texts effectively in written interpretative argument

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Timetable

First Semester

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Lecture

Stream Days Times Weeks
Attend
L1 Tuesday 15:00-16:50 9-13, 15-22
Thursday 12:00-12:50 9-13, 15-22