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POLS320 Pacific Geopolitics in the 21st Century

Critically examines philosophical and practical underpinnings of Pacific Island political systems, and compares these with nation-state and democratic theory. Also compares and contrasts different Pacific Island country political systems.

Taking a critical theory approach to the study of politics and geopolitics in order to understand a region that is central to New Zealand foreign policy, and important to geopolitical rivalry between countries such as the United States, China, Taiwan and Australia. The paper seeks to build a robust understanding of the Pacific and how it should be engaged, particularly from a New Zealand foreign policy perspective.

Paper title Pacific Geopolitics in the 21st Century
Paper code POLS320
Subject Politics
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Not offered in 2019
Domestic Tuition Fees (NZD) $886.35
International Tuition Fees (NZD) $3,766.35

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Prerequisite
18 200-level POLS points or (18 100-level POLS points and 18 200-level PACI points)
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Eligibility
An interest in national and international affairs is an advantage.
Contact
politics@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff

To be confirmed

Paper Structure
Key stages in the development of Pacific nation-states are examined using critical theories.
Textbooks
Course reader available for purchase. E-reserve on Blackboard
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Interdisciplinary perspective, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Research, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
Demonstrate in-depth understanding of the central concepts, theories and current areas of debate in comparative politics, politics in the Pacific region, and geopolitics.

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Timetable

Not offered in 2019

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard

Critically examines philosophical and practical underpinnings of Pacific Island political systems, and compares these with nation-state and democratic theory. Also compares and contrasts different Pacific Island country political systems.

Taking a critical theory approach to the study of politics and geopolitics in order to understand a region that is central to New Zealand foreign policy, and important to geopolitical rivalry between countries such as the United States, China, Taiwan and Australia. The paper seeks to build a robust understanding of the Pacific and how it should be engaged, particularly from a New Zealand foreign policy perspective.

Paper title Pacific Geopolitics in the 21st Century
Paper code POLS320
Subject Politics
EFTS 0.1500
Points 18 points
Teaching period Not offered in 2020
Domestic Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for 2020 have not yet been set
International Tuition Fees Tuition Fees for international students are elsewhere on this website.

^ Top of page

Prerequisite
18 200-level POLS points or (18 100-level POLS points and 18 200-level PACI points)
Schedule C
Arts and Music
Eligibility
An interest in national and international affairs is an advantage.
Contact
politics@otago.ac.nz
Teaching staff

To be confirmed

Paper Structure
Key stages in the development of Pacific nation-states are examined using critical theories.
Textbooks
Course reader available for purchase. E-reserve on Blackboard
Graduate Attributes Emphasised
Global perspective, Interdisciplinary perspective, Scholarship, Communication, Critical thinking, Cultural understanding, Research, Self-motivation.
View more information about Otago's graduate attributes.
Learning Outcomes
Demonstrate in-depth understanding of the central concepts, theories and current areas of debate in comparative politics, politics in the Pacific region, and geopolitics.

^ Top of page

Timetable

Not offered in 2020

Location
Dunedin
Teaching method
This paper is taught On Campus
Learning management system
Blackboard